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  1. #1
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    Powdercoating scuff resistance- dull after 2nd ride normal ?

    I finished my frame no. 8, but itīs the first one I got powdercoated.

    It was done at a shop which does bicycles for a bicycle manufacuter and which is said to have good knowledge on powdercoating frames.

    I chose a glossy red.
    I took only 2 rides / less than 10 hours of riding (nothing special, non aggresive trailriding) to get the toptube completely dull.
    It was raining and my shorts were wet and muddy. Of course this is mechanic load for the powdercoat. But not a special situation for mountainbiking in my opinion. I expected scratches and dullness in the longtime, but not after just 10 hours.

    This it what it looked when it was brandnew.

    Dark-red, glossy
    1 week later the whole toptube is dull.
    Powdercoating scuff resistance- dull after 2nd ride normal ?-imgp7903small.jpg

    Am I just expecting to much from a glossy powdercoat ?
    I canīt believe all the other glossy powdercoats are dull and scratchy after the first or second ride.

    The powdercoater examined the frame and said hardness and the other specs are normal, they do a lot of frames in that colour and this specific colour has no other properties, as every other colour they use.
    He said most likely the way I use this bike is just not matching with the resistance a powdercoat can give.

    How do your coatings hold up with normal mountainbike-riding ?

    Iīm not sure what to do (apart from trying to get some of my money back). Should I consider a powdercoat from another coater at all ?
    Am I demanding to much from a powdercoat (staying glossy for at leat a few month aof use) ? Single deep scratches are no problem for me. But a whole toptube going dull looks really ugly.

  2. #2
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    If muddy shorts were rubbing on top tube that would also damage paint. If anything I would expect powdercoating to be equal to paint or a bit harder.

    Overall, I have been very impressed with the durability of my powder coating to really abusive usage including insane amounts of riding in nasty weather but I am also not a fan of glossy finish and simply want something that protects the metal. I actually like the weathered look when the finish shows signs of usage.
    Mark Farnsworth, Raleigh, NC
    http://farnsworthbikes.com

  3. #3
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    Glossy stuff will no longer be glossy pretty quick if it's wet/muddy/being rubbed with a random piece of cloth.

    -Walt
    Waltworks Custom Bicycles
    Park City, UT USA
    www.waltworks.com
    waltworks.blogspot.com

  4. #4
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    It needed clear coat over it.

    The WWTP frame I did was two tone silver and black without any clear. The silver is a base coat for candy colors and has a metallic look similar to the red on that frame. What happened is that sweat would drip on the silver and it would oxidize and get a dark spot. Within a few months, the silver was almost the same color as the black and you could actually see where rust was forming under the silver.

    I had the same coater use the same color and do a candy red on the frame that replaced it and it still looks nearly perfect but the whole thing had a clear coat shot over the top of the other two colors.

    I'm guessing it has a lot less to do with water and mud and a whole lot more to do with salt water dripping off of you onto the top tube.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the comments.

    So itīs not that unusual for a glossy powdercoat to get dull from wet and muddy cloth quite fast. (what about all those cyclocross bikes, are they dull after the first race where the frame gets shouldered etc. ? )

    Sweat could be an issue, too. Didnīt think about that.
    Today the coater said, an additional clearcoat is possible, but not needed with this colour.


    So I guess, as far as I ride this thing in every kind of weather and with shorts, Iīll just have to live with the "used-look".

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by MiWi View Post
    Today the coater said, an additional clearcoat is possible, but not needed with this colour.
    That's exactly what mine told me too. In my case, the guy didn't know what he was talking about. The one with the clear looks excellent still. I'm 99% sure that's the issue.

  7. #7
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    I just looked at the frame once again. And I think that you are right.

    Itīs a to big surface and to equally distributed for scratches from my shorts / knees. Its to near to the saddle, too. Where me knees never ever will be. And most important itīs more on top, than on the sides.
    It rained and the rain mixed with the sweat and most likely distributed quite equally over the whole toptube.

    Thanks for the hint.

  8. #8
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    No problem. I'd be tempted to have the guy re-do it and then clear coat it. I'd offer to pay the extra for the clear I suppose but he's provided a powder that didn't stand up to sweat. He should have known better IMHO, it's a bike and everyone knows you sweat. I have my guy a Mulligan because I knew the frame would be replaced fairly quickly (which it was) and I didn't want to beat him up on it. I did insist on clear on the one that replaced it though and again, it still looks great.

  9. #9
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    Find out what chemistry the powder is. If its polyurethane it should be better than that i think.

    The easiest thing to do now is just matte it down with a fine sandpaper, like 12-1500 grit or a scotchbrite pad or something and then just clear coat it. done.

    Usually the quality of the paintjob is proportional to the time invested.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  10. #10
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    MiWi, off topic: what remote telescoping seatpost is that?
    Latitude: 44.93 N

  11. #11
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    That is a Forca SPS400 (4.1/2" drop in 2 steps, cheap and mechanic).


    I have a 30.0mm seattube and Iīm planning to use a 30.0mm Gravity Dropper Turbo LP (as far as I know the only 30.0mm dropperpost). But as this is my first MTB and Iīve never ridden a dropperpost, I decided to try the cheap Forca 27.2mm (with shim) first. By now the Forca does what itīs supposed to and I really have no claims. Quite a bargain for 90 Euro (120$) imho.

    I think it is sold under a different brandname, too. But I canīt remember.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by car bone View Post
    Find out what chemistry the powder is. If its polyurethane it should be better than that i think.

    The easiest thing to do now is just matte it down with a fine sandpaper, like 12-1500 grit or a scotchbrite pad or something and then just clear coat it. done.

    Usually the quality of the paintjob is proportional to the time invested.
    I was wondering if this would work. If there has actually been a chemical reaction in the metallic with the salt, I'd think that even scuffing it may not achieve the same look where it was scuffed and where the sweat ate the metallic.

  13. #13
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    there is only one way to find out. and its also the cheapest and fastest way.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  14. #14
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    Cleaned and "sanded" (gray scotchbrite pad) the frame already.
    This morning, just before starting to paint the frame, I found my accelerator to be hardened / dried out.
    Ordered new accelerator and hope to paint the frame with clearcoat the next days. Iīll report how it worked out.

  15. #15
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    Hey;

    Paint will never be as good as good PC. Bad PC is likely still better than paint. Bad PC would have to be REALLY bad to be worse than paint. PC is so much easier than painting. Better for your health. Just better. It aint no free lunch, but it IS better. Mine still looks pretty good on the Kroozer after a year of hard use. I also installed 3M PPF on the high wear areas to keep my creation boootiful.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  16. #16
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    That was my intention when I decided to finally get my frames powdercoated. Give it to a powdercoater and donīt mess with those harmful DIY paintjobs in the basement anymore and get a more durable surface. Thatīs why I got really confused when I realized it was much worse than with my DIY paintjobs.

    There must be something wrong with this PC. My monstercross is simply painted by myself and has been ridden in the same terrain, same weather and with same shorts as the hardtail. The DIY paintjob shows nearly no visible scratches after 6 month. The PC was done in two rides.

    As a makeshift I will clearcoat it by myself, ride it a while until Iīll get a new PC done by another shop.

    Was riding with two buddies yesterday. Both with powdercoated frames, one was 3 years old, the other 7 years. Both looked really good. Compared to my 2 weeks old mess, the 7 year old PC-job looked brandnew. The bikes get ridden in the same conditions with the same kind of MTB shorts and so on.

    I guess I just got a bad start with my powdercoat-relationship.

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