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  1. #1
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    Not Another Fat Bike

    Started my first fat bike today. Mostly just to try it and due to a little peer pressure.









    NOTHING WORKS LIKE CLOCKWORK

    www.clockworkbikes.com

  2. #2
    Harrumph
    Reputation: G-reg's Avatar
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    Well, you have my attention!
    Slowly slipping to retrogrouchyness

  3. #3
    J_K
    J_K is online now
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-reg View Post
    Well, you have my attention!
    Ditto!


    That fork is very nice! I really like how you do the bends on the lower part of the legs.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by J_K View Post
    Ditto!


    That fork is very nice! I really like how you do the bends on the lower part of the legs.
    And what material you're using?

  5. #5
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    Joel, beautiful work as usual! I'm guessing SG 4130 for the legs?

    Question on the steerer though. Any particular reason you went with a tapered steel steerer? Purely aesthetic? It's my understand that it was a Engin/Paragon creation for tandem use. Seems overkill, not that there is inherently anything wrong with overkill. Just wondering, that's all.

  6. #6
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    The legs are 1" x .049" 4130 tube, 3" CLR and the crown pieces are 1.125" x .058" that I normally use for 1" LD stems.

    I used the steerer just cause I wanted to try something new and it looks more proportional. This bike is all about trying new things. The steerer is way overkill for this bike but also for tandems.

    This is the legs being bent. The crown pieces are done on a draw bender by a vendor.





    Thanks, Joel
    NOTHING WORKS LIKE CLOCKWORK

    www.clockworkbikes.com

  7. #7
    WIGGLER
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    Cool lookin fork!
    PAYASO 36er.....Live the Circus

  8. #8
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    The first picture hurt my brain: miters 90 deg out of phase, and I couldn't understand it. Scrolling down to the assembled fork kept me from having an aneurism.

  9. #9
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    Not Another Fat Bike

    Awesome Joel! That's such a sweet fork! Looking forward to the rest of the build...

  10. #10
    will rant for food
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    Sweet, I was hoping you would make one eventually. Looking forward to it, looks great so far.
    Latitude: 44.93 N

  11. #11
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    That bender is making me jealous, that's a tight clr for 1" tube. Diacro #3 perhaps?
    cheers
    andy walker

  12. #12
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    Moving along. This will be a no-file frame to greatly speed progress.





    NOTHING WORKS LIKE CLOCKWORK

    www.clockworkbikes.com

  13. #13
    Nemophilist
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    Hey;

    Nicely crafted, of course. I hope someone rides the crap out of it. I'll be interested to know if the SS/ST junction can withstand it.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  14. #14
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    Not Another Fat Bike

    Very cool. Can you divulge the approx radius on that seatstay bend?

  15. #15
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    The ST joints are plenty strong. It's not a high-stress area and plenty of bikes have a lot less holding them together.


    The top bends and bridge are 3" radius and the bottom are 10".

    -Joel
    NOTHING WORKS LIKE CLOCKWORK

    www.clockworkbikes.com

  16. #16
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    Joel makes a good point regarding seat-stay attachment. In fact, all earlier frames for the first half of the bicycles life were done this way. Although I had a Holdsworth Super Mistral as my first purchased frame in the early 1970's that was a Fastback, the current jointing did not really appear until BMX, then Mountain Bikes had it as standard practice.
    This does not mean that the old style is irrelevant, it just seems to have been 'lost'. There are some really tight build situations where perhaps consideration to side attachment could/should be looked at again.

    Eric
    If I don't make an attempt, how will I know if it will work?

  17. #17
    WIGGLER
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    Looking good Joel can't wait to see it assembled!
    Last edited by todwil; 01-26-2014 at 05:59 PM.
    PAYASO 36er.....Live the Circus

  18. #18
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    I've done stuff very similar (albeit with less extreme bends) and I can say definitively that it'll be fine. You can practically make the seatstays from balsa wood and hold them on with twine and they still work. English uses like 12.5mm x .028 or something for his.

    Really not an issue, and as others have pointed out - even pretty small surface area silver soldered butt joints on the sides of the seat tube is plenty enough that I've never seen one fail. There must be tens, if not hundreds of millions of bikes built that way, too.

    -Walt
    Waltworks Custom Bicycles
    Park City, UT USA
    www.waltworks.com
    waltworks.blogspot.com

  19. #19
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    Not Another Fat Bike

    Quote Originally Posted by Clockwork Bikes View Post
    Started my first fat bike today. Mostly just to try it and due to a little peer pressure.
    Is it for you, or for a customer?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by FTMN View Post
    Is it for you, or for a customer?
    It's for me. I've gotten a few fat bike quote requests and have declined them since I've never made one. I'll call this R&D and take the tax write-off.
    NOTHING WORKS LIKE CLOCKWORK

    www.clockworkbikes.com

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clockwork Bikes View Post
    Moving along. This will be a no-file frame to greatly speed progress.
    Ahh!! Your no-file fillets look better than my filed ones! Great work and craftsmanship; as always.

  22. #22
    Nemophilist
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    Well...

    For those more familiar with Fatbikes, Surly has quite apparently had some different experiences with that junction than everyone here. I'm not sure anyone knows why. It may have had nothing to do with the tube layout, but they had a rash of failures... like almost every frame made, for a while. I would not have thought being fat would have made any difference, but it was only on the Pugs, so... Just curious.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  23. #23
    Shamisen Appreciator
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrailMaker View Post
    Well...

    For those more familiar with Fatbikes, Surly has quite apparently had some different experiences with that junction than everyone here. I'm not sure anyone knows why. It may have had nothing to do with the tube layout, but they had a rash of failures... like almost every frame made, for a while. I would not have thought being fat would have made any difference, but it was only on the Pugs, so... Just curious.
    Interesting...I wonder why. Perhaps a batch of them used a tube with too thin a wall where it counts?

    Great looking build Joel.
    Sean Chaney :: Owner/Builder :: Vertigo Cycles LLC
    flickr :: www.vertigocycles.com

  24. #24
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    Nice bike, and I like the bender, too.

  25. #25
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    Done! To the painter on Monday. They use a really cool primer from PPG made for Airbus to coat the inside of fuel tanks. It just happens to be Clockwork green and is super tough. Example.











    -Joel
    NOTHING WORKS LIKE CLOCKWORK

    www.clockworkbikes.com

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