Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    RCP Fabrication
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    389

    Jody Collier on ER70 vs Weldmold

    Tig Welding Tubing...Thin Wall Steel Tubing

    Next week he is welding a frame.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    119
    Thanks for posting that up. I supplied Jody with the tubing and did all the coping for him for this project. I basically sent him a kit all ready to weld along with some practice pieces. It's been a lot of fun working with him. He's a great guy and I was happy to give back for all of the work he's put into his videos and website. Such a great resource. And I use his TIG finger religiously.

  3. #3
    RCP Fabrication
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    389
    I agree, and his tig fingers are great, I don't use it much on frames, but for heavier welding, almost all the time.

  4. #4
    shifty
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    39
    That's great! I love those videos... quite a character.

    -Bernie

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vulture's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    249
    Fills to the root, no underfill or undercut there. Any word on the cups?

  6. #6
    DWF
    DWF is offline
    Non Dual Bliss
    Reputation: DWF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,240
    Cool to see someone outside the biz trying their hand at welding thin wall tubes. I get a kick out of seeing how popular 880T has gotten with builders these days (I wish I was getting a kickback).

    The idea behind switching to 880T way back when and promoting it to others was not because it flowed better or any other reason like that. The reason was that the ultimate strength of a weld is based on the root diameter/cross section area of the weldment. Columbus Foco, 853, TT Gold, were all strong enough and thin walled enough back then that if you preferred smaller, "flatter", weldments that disappeared under the paint you were at real risk of having a weld that would be weaker than the parent metal. Not good. The fact that 880T was so much stronger than ER70 and at the same time more ductile is a win/win.

    With that out of the way, the problem he's having in the vid is the same one many guys suffer from (including myself when I'm out of practice) and that is not maintaining a constant angular/geometric relationship between the tungsten and the joint as he walks around the tube. You want to maintain relative perpendicularity of the tungsten with the joint with a slight pointing of the tungsten in the direction of travel. If you start "pushing" the tungsten across the tube you lose control of the arc and your welds will be uneven in cross section, pattern, and margins from start to finish. Maintaining the proper angular relationship between tungsten and the joint as you travel around the tube is why I'm a big fan of the beer bottle exercise I've spoken of on here in the past.
    A man must have enemies and places he is not welcome. In the end we are not only defined by our friends but those against us.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    197
    I like the way he describes his movements and what he is doing over the footage. I have one of those 3rd hand tools too, but mine is called a welding spider and has several legs as well as different types of contact points. fun to build and useful for tough to clamp setups. it weighs about 7 or 10 lbs and made from offcuts of 1/2 x3 bar and 5/16 rod.

    what was that cup setup he was running? pretty outrageous. some sort of gas lens obviously but what? what kind of cfh do you need to run out of one of those?

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by sonic reducer View Post
    I like the way he describes his movements and what he is doing over the footage. I have one of those 3rd hand tools too, but mine is called a welding spider and has several legs as well as different types of contact points. fun to build and useful for tough to clamp setups. it weighs about 7 or 10 lbs and made from offcuts of 1/2 x3 bar and 5/16 rod.

    what was that cup setup he was running? pretty outrageous. some sort of gas lens obviously but what? what kind of cfh do you need to run out of one of those?
    It's a cup he has been working on. He sent one to me to try out. It screws right onto a small gas lens and butts up against the insulator. I think he's trying to having them ready for sale this spring. Very nice coverage. He uses it a lot in his videos so that he can get lots of stickout to help improve the ability to see the puddle in his videos. The standard gas lens often got in the way. I used it on some practice ti and stainless joints. These were at 18 cfh and about 3/4" stickout.


    New cup from Welding Tips and Tricks by Zanconato Custom Cycles, on Flickr


    Filled by Zanconato Custom Cycles, on Flickr


    New cup from Welding Tips and Tricks by Zanconato Custom Cycles, on Flickr

    Don, his next video will have some shots that I took in my shop using my Anvil tooling.

  9. #9
    Chicago Ill
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    19
    I would like to try some of that 800 filler rod. Does anyone know of an online source without having to buy 10lbs of it?

    Thanks, Scott.

  10. #10
    RCP Fabrication
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    389
    Walt, myself and Dave sell it by the pound to help people who don't want to order 10lbs of it at a time.

  11. #11
    Chicago Ill
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    19
    Could you quote me a pound of 0.045" via PM?

    Scott.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    43
    Quote Originally Posted by zank View Post
    Thanks for posting that up. I supplied Jody with the tubing and did all the coping for him for this project. I basically sent him a kit all ready to weld along with some practice pieces. It's been a lot of fun working with him. He's a great guy and I was happy to give back for all of the work he's put into his videos and website. Such a great resource. And I use his TIG finger religiously.

    I've been watching Jody's videos for a couple of years now and find them to be very educational. I had been hoping that he might do something bike related at some point so I'm happy to see him take this project on. I got a couple of the Tig fingers and find them to be very handy.

    In my Tig practice I haven't been using heat sinks or back purging and I see that Jody isn't using them in this video.

    I'm wondering how much of a difference the use of a heat sink would make when welding thin walled bike type tubing, in terms of amperage used and travel speed?

    Alistair.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by A. Spence View Post
    I've been watching Jody's videos for a couple of years now and find them to be very educational. I had been hoping that he might do something bike related at some point so I'm happy to see him take this project on. I got a couple of the Tig fingers and find them to be very handy.

    In my Tig practice I haven't been using heat sinks or back purging and I see that Jody isn't using them in this video.

    I'm wondering how much of a difference the use of a heat sink would make when welding thin walled bike type tubing, in terms of amperage used and travel speed?

    Alistair.
    I was frustrated when I started using heat sinks, Alistair. But you'll figure out quick how much you might need to cheat the heat towards the tube with the heat sink. I just set my machine at 75 amps and use the pedal. I feel like I can travel faster on each successive bike, but that's just practice and the muscle memory of rolling my wrist that Don is talking about. One reason I use the TIG finger all the time on the bikes is I slides really easily along the tube and helps keep my movements smooth. It's not so much about the heat.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jay_ntwr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    708
    Quote Originally Posted by zank View Post
    One reason I use the TIG finger all the time on the bikes is I slides really easily along the tube and helps keep my movements smooth.
    Great point. I can already feel the slide in my mind. I'll be ordering one immediately just for that reason alone.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    119
    Jay, another thing that helps me is running beads on aluminum sheet. You need to move fast, so it's helped me have a very light touch on whatever I'm proppng on. That's helped me keep my movements smooth.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,649
    Semi off-topic. Is there any video series like this for brazing? I had a quick look at his site and it looks like only mig and tig.

  17. #17
    shifty
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    39
    the bashing it with a hammer was a nice touch!

    Tig Welding a Bike Frame

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •