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  1. #1
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    have you made your own bars?

    Hey guys,

    So I'm building up a sweet commuter/townie thing, and I was thinking that it would be awesome to make some bars. In particular I wanted to make some "bull moose" style bars that would work with threadless, so a stem too.

    Does anyone have any experience here, and what materials did you use?

    Thanks a bunch,
    Adam

  2. #2
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    Adam,

    Here's a bullmoose style I did a few years ago to match the sweep and position of the customers bar/stem set up...

    Groovy Cycleworks 330-988-0537: What sound does a Moose make?

    there's more fabrication, including a custom Ibis "hand job" scattered throughout that month, but that post should give you an idea of some of the process.

    rody
    As requested by the MTBR gods, I am the voice of Groovy Cycleworks, check it out... http://www.groovycycleworks.com

  3. #3
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    Sweet! thanks Rody!

    your bars are awesome.

    how thick is the tubing you used on those?

  4. #4
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    I built a set of Jones knock-offs out of 4130 back before Titec made aluminum ones, since I didn't have the cash for his titanium version. I used .035 for the grip sections and 1" diameter .049 for the crossbar. No bends, of course, which meant I could get away with the .035".

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by adarn View Post

    how thick is the tubing you used on those?
    Adam,

    Your tubing selection will be dictated by designing for the forces anticipated and your skill level in fabrication.

    Bars and forks are less tolerant of poor fabrication techniques and carry higher consequences if the part fails. That said, I would suggest you begin with heavier gauge tubing and overbuild the part until you are confident in your design and fabrication skill set, then you can refine the piece and lighten it up at a later stage.

    rody
    As requested by the MTBR gods, I am the voice of Groovy Cycleworks, check it out... http://www.groovycycleworks.com

  6. #6
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    great advice guys, thanks!

  7. #7
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    Adam

    Initially wasn't sure what a 'Bull Moose' bar was until I Googled it. For me, nostalgic.

    I make a similar bar to the one Groovy Cycleworks produced, with, designwise, extention to the 45 degree hand piece forward in the form of an aero bar. A real 'horny' bar, excells at speed and head winds. Anyway, not trying to out do anyone, but pass on I what I hope is useful info.

    I use 4130 1"x.035 for the V section, and 7/8"x.35 for the hand-grips (I have tried .020 - but this is too fragile). From the A-head to end of forward extention is 360mm and it is not weak. The width is around 600mm, with 40 degree hand angle set.

    I look at the 1 piece handlebar/stem as a Holistic piece that must fit the rider specifically. I don't know how far in the design/build you are, but offer the following advice.

    Get someone to take a side-on photo of you riding in your present position. Use the photo to see yourself for back angle and reach. Draw a line down your spine to the ground and measure the angle. I use a 51degree back angle, 27degree stem rise from horizontal for example. See where your hands should be or prefer to be. When you weld up, this position is fixed, so spend the time to get it right.

    Once you have sorted this area out, I suggest that you Tig the V to the A-head sleeve, but braze the bar itself to the V. This is so if you need to later replace/adjust/re-angle your handgrips, you can heat and remove and redo.

    If you want to try a more advanced design, you can get Specialised sleeves for the A-head that allow for angle adjustment. They vary in degrees from 8-18, with 12-12 being the Zero position. This gives you a handy range of adjustment. You will need to get a piece of 4130 machined to fit the sleeve out of 1.5" x .120, 48mm o/a length, wall thickness of 1-1.2mm is all you need.

    If you want a picture, I can E-mail one. Sorry guys, not being secretive, just cannot get pic's on for some reason.

    Also, can some-one pass on a supplier of 4130 who stocks and is prepared to send to New Zealand some 7/8" & 1" x .028 tube in 600mm (2') lengths.

    Eric

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Malcolm View Post

    Also, can some-one pass on a supplier of 4130 who stocks and is prepared to send to New Zealand some 7/8" & 1" x .028 tube in 600mm (2') lengths.

    Eric
    Australian suppliers you could ask:
    Airport Metals
    Performance Metals
    Trisled (who probably just onsell from above but they do international shipping).

  9. #9
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    I made these a few years back. On my son's bike now. don't remember the specs of the tubing, sorry.

  10. #10
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    O/k, I finally cracked the code of doing pictures, here's what I do:

    Hope this clarifies my explaination

    Eric
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails have you made your own bars?-img_0130_2.jpg  

    have you made your own bars?-img_0135_2.jpg  


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