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  1. #1
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    frame material "feels" or what absorbs vibration best?

    Sorry if this is covered somewhere else.

    I guess my "problem" is that the voodoo aizan
    http://www.voodoocycles.net/08_aizan.htm
    is abusive to ride for 2+ hours on my lower back (4 * broken TP's, herniated discs, from 4 years ago, and 1 * surgery for the herniation 2 years ago) I love the SS, and have used it as a 1 * 9. It is already light (18-19 rigid, and 21-22 with fork) but I just need the smaller vibrations gone.
    Combo of Stiff frame, and no travel. I have a rocky altitude 29er as a "real bike" but do you think that a Ti, softtail might be an answer?

    the small roots, rocks, etc are NOT the problem for my back, it is the small, almost road type vibrations that cause the pain on the herniations. When the trail gets bumpy, I start to move over the bike, and can absorb things with legs, etc.

    Was thinking that the 29er, moots, softtail might be the answer?
    good ski/bike deals at www.mntlion.com

    My life is better than your vacation.

  2. #2
    Randomhead
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    I am skeptical that there is a significant difference in damping from material alone. The differences are due to the relative stiffness of the frame given the modulus of elasticity, size, and thickness of the tubes. In your case, I suspect that the small differences between materials alone will not help your problem.

  3. #3
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    Carbon will be the best to kill the 'buzz'. Second would be titanium, then steel. But like unterhausen said, these are small variances in materials.

    Other options short of a soft tail might be some sort of suspension seat post. Or even a carbon/Ti post that will flex a bit more than the post you have. A carbon post fixed the buzz for my wife and myself on our aluminum road tandem.

  4. #4
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    thanks,

    I'm running 30psi tubeless tires, and a carbon post, already.

    now to find a carbon, or Ti, single speed frame for 29 wheels..
    good ski/bike deals at www.mntlion.com

    My life is better than your vacation.

  5. #5
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    Reputation: Evil4bc's Avatar
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    Ouch
    For ride feel and vibration transfer you picked the worst frame out there -
    Scandium main tubes with aluminum rear - this reads like this bike is soo stiff you will be spitting your filling out after 2 hours on the bike path .

    For frame material that is a bit more "forgiving " I would personally go these routes
    1. Butted steel - find a good local frame builder thats knows a thing about design and look into a frame made from double butted chromoly preferably tig welded .
    Steel is going to give you the best ride feel vs vibration absorption
    2. Ti
    Titanium has a bit more memory than steel so the bike will feel more responsive and soak up bumps about the same as a quality steel frame .

    3. Carbon - this materials has always felt dead to me as far as ride feel but this doest mean you wont get a nice smooth even ride from one of these bike there just kinds "dead" feeling in the responsiveness category .

    Hope this helps , ditch the aluminum and find something a bit more compliant and you will be much much happier .
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  6. #6
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    Reputation: bobbotron's Avatar
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    Maybe you should try to get a bike fit on your bike, could be a poor set up contributing to your discomfort? Or focus on some core strengthening exercises/physio?

  7. #7
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    That's an important point. Being human we always look for a soft answer which normally involves buying something shiny, when the answer could be in a Pilates class or getting properly fitted up.

    Having said that, I spent a year trying to make a Scandium bike ride like it wasn't basically Aluminium and failled dismally. Short of doing something radical Al will always be Al.

    My personal preference for ride-feel is Titanium. It's such a strange material in that it both feels soft and stiff at the same time, and would be my 'money-is-no-object pick. Whether it's worth the upcharge over steel is a value judgment.
    No longer member of the bike industry nor society, so don't hassle me.

  8. #8
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    thanks guys. Ya been doing yoga 2-3 times a week, and core work about the same for 4 years now to make some of the pain go away. It helps, but I'm thinking that after this kind of time, maybe the bike is what needs a change too.
    Also tried using the syntace adjustable stem, and bars with 3,5,7, and 12 deg sweep. Right now the 12 is the best.... I think that the bike fit is fine, as my rocky fits similar in TT/stem length, and saddle to pedal and I dont get the pain as much on that ride.
    good ski/bike deals at www.mntlion.com

    My life is better than your vacation.

  9. #9
    How much does it weigh?
    Reputation: Borgschulze's Avatar
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    I had wrist pains for a while... changed bar angles, grips, and finally.. bought a carbon bar (same sweep as the previous one) pain was gone.

  10. #10
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    I've tried ti carbon and small dia al seat posts and they all transmit shock. I've done the same thing with stems. I only run carbon or ti bars and stems. Some things are better than others but at the end of the day any metal is still metal and the shock is going to come through. Fattest tires you can fit on there and get your pressure down to the low 20s will help a lot more than frame material. And personally I think you hit it on the head in your original post. Soft tail.
    No it never stops hurting, but if you keep at it you can go faster.

  11. #11
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    I have a buddy who has back problems like you do . Switched out to a Cane Creek Thud Buster seat post and carbon bars.Pain went away. Wife started to complain about lower back pain . So I did the same thing to her commuter bike. Pain went away. So I then switched her road and MTB. She loves me now much more enjoyable to ride with her.

    Tim

  12. #12
    Who turned out the lights
    Reputation: Francis Buxton's Avatar
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    Sounds to me like TimT and Brad hit the nail on the head with the suspension post. I used to run one when I did a lot of off-road racing fixed gear on a rigid and wanted to be able to stay in the seat as much as possible. It takes the edge off of a lot of bumps like that but you don't lose any power transmission through the pedals. It's definitely worth a shot. That frame sounds a little stiff too if the post doesn't solve it or you just don't like suspension posts. I know a lot of people just don't like them. The main reason I got rid of mine is b/c I wore it out (I think it was a U.S.E. (telescoping)) and just never got around to buying another one.

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