Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    16

    Fork tube angles

    I'm nearing the point of making my steel front fork. I've been mulling over my original design, and have a question or two for those of you that make your own.

    In my original geometry I ran a line from my front axle points to the center of the head tube, and ran the fork tubes along this plane. It's going to be a little more involved to make the cuts that way, and I'm not sure it has any design advantage. Initially I thought it might lessen the moment on the joining segments, but I'm not so sold on that now.

    Do those of you that make forks just run the fork tubes parallel to the head tube, and offset them forward with the other segments? Do you have reason for one or the other?

    Lacking posts for image attachment
    h ttp: //i.imgur.com/18y1G.png

  2. #2
    Randomhead
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,022
    I think getting all the offset in the crown segments looks a little clunky. However, it's much easier to miter by hand.

    Not obvious to me that it would make much difference in the stress on the crown segments, it probably is less compliant. PVD is the only person I have seen express an opinion on this. IIRC, his position is that there is less stress on the crown segments if the blades are not parallel to the head tube.

  3. #3
    Framebuilder
    Reputation: Live Wire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    415
    I've read PVD's reasoning on segmented forks too. Even though I agree with him, the way I choose to get the rake/ offset with a segmented fork is usually aesthetic. I'll keep Crown sockets parallel to the steerer and rake the blades on road/ cross bikes and do the straight blade PVD approved crown rake on mtb's....never a problem with either configuration.

  4. #4
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,833

    It doesn't matter

    I've done a gazillion both ways. I don't think there is a ride quality or strength difference, at least enough to notice or worry about. So do whatever you think looks good and/or is easy for you to accomplish.

    -Walt
    Waltworks Custom Bicycles
    Park City, UT USA
    www.waltworks.com
    waltworks.blogspot.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •