Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    2

    Fillet Brazing Breezer/Wright drop-outs

    Hey,

    Imma newb at this (lots of practice but only 1 full build under my belt). I've been looking at the Wright + Breezer dropouts for my next build (road frame) and I'm wondering if they're OK for fillet brazing.

    Somewhere I remember reading that its not recommended to fillet braze them but I cannot remember where I read this or what the reasoning was behind it.

    Thanks
    -m-

  2. #2
    Randomhead
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,038
    it's not a particularly strong joint unless it is well brazed and mitered pretty closely. I wouldn't recommend it for a first bike

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Eric Malcolm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    499
    Umm....

    Before discovering the MTBR frame builders forum, I constructed my E-stay frame using the Wright's style rear drop-out, mitered the stays for max surface area and fillet silvered them. That was 18 mths ago and I have 8,000 plus miles on that bike that is used as a road/gravel bike.

    I have since read on the forum that there is some concerns about using the Wright's drop-out on a front fork, but I have also observed Wolfhound doing this on his forks (he used a tube for a through axle), again, before I found the MTBR, as I studied his work from his Blogs.

    Wolfhound is not the only builder doing front drop-outs this way, just the one that I can remember with surety.

    Construction wise for the beginner, you need to do the braze with all the parts to be joined well held in a jig, and as noted, with excellent mitering, align the wheel slots, take your time in the setting up, can be done.

    Eric
    If I don't make an attempt, how will I know if it will work?

  4. #4
    Most Delicious
    Reputation: dr.welby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,027
    Quote Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
    it's not a particularly strong joint unless it is well brazed and mitered pretty closely.
    Seems like that would apply to every other joint...

  5. #5
    Randomhead
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,038
    I can't think of a joint with less surface area than a stay/fork blade and a wright dropout. The strength of brazed joints are closely related to the gap.

    If I just said, "not recommended for a first bike" then people would ask why.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    2
    Hey,

    Thanks for the insight. So what I'm taking away from this is that there's nothing inherently wrong with fillet brazing a wright/breezer dropout to a CS/SS provided one has the skills/experience.

    I can dig that.

  7. #7
    Nemophilist
    Reputation: TrailMaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,722
    Hey;

    If everything is optimized, there is still the chance of mayhem occurring. Since that potential exists, even in a well done example, and always depending on fortune and conditions of use, you may be wise to play the percentages and do something with a bit more margin. If you choose to proceed anyway, just be aware.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  8. #8
    Most Delicious
    Reputation: dr.welby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,027
    Quote Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
    I can't think of a joint with less surface area than a stay/fork blade and a wright dropout.
    I'd point out that the seatstay joint is in compression, with the hub bearings there's no torque on the dropouts, and they're trussed together by a rigidly clamped axle. I would expect that if the joint was so dire we'd see a lot more failures in the area, especially among the Surly track dropouts which cantilever out further.

  9. #9
    Framebuilder
    Reputation: Live Wire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    422
    Quote Originally Posted by dr.welby View Post
    I'd point out that the seatstay joint is in compression, with the hub bearings there's no torque on the dropouts, and they're trussed together by a rigidly clamped axle. I would expect that if the joint was so dire we'd see a lot more failures in the area, especially among the Surly track dropouts which cantilever out further.
    Then I'd point out that you're telling that to a guy with 100x more torch time than both of us put together and that the Surly ( sub 11) drops were meant to be tig welded.

    I'd only fillet that joint if the chainstays had a diameter of .75".

  10. #10
    Randomhead
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,038
    my assumption is that a person brazing a first frame might not be that great at it. I wouldn't do it myself, but I'm not arguing against brazed Wright dropouts. I'm sure people have done it.

Similar Threads

  1. Fillet brazing with oxy-propane
    By vintapperen in forum Frame Building
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 12-24-2012, 08:23 PM
  2. Fillet brazing tangent tubes
    By golden boy in forum Frame Building
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-20-2012, 10:17 AM
  3. TIG welding vs fillet brazing
    By golden boy in forum Frame Building
    Replies: 51
    Last Post: 01-18-2012, 02:42 PM
  4. Vent Hole size for Fillet Brazing?
    By illcomm33 in forum Frame Building
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-07-2012, 04:11 PM
  5. Question: about tig welding and fillet brazing?
    By jeffgothro in forum Frame Building
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 07-04-2011, 01:15 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •