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Thread: #5 SoFat

  1. #1
    J_K
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    #5 SoFat

    This is my fifth frame, first was 29er which is POS, but I'm still riding it, about 300h since march . Number 2 was a fixed gear bike, I did about 4000km during the summer. Third was a gravel grinder, actually sits in the basement fully welded without paint or parts, no riding. Fourth frame was a ÜOS lugged road bike, not much riding, but liked it so much that I sold my carbon road bike.

    Now it's time for #5 which is a fat bike.
    Nothing too wild, 70/73 angles with 50mm rake fork and 460mm CS. Clown shoes with Bud's front and rear, 1x10 drivetrain with RaceFace Next SL cranks.

    First I build the fork.





    Next step is to weld and braze the frame.




    Last edited by J_K; 01-18-2014 at 12:24 PM.

  2. #2
    RCP Fabrication
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    Love the looks of the fork lugs! Can't wait to see the fork on the frame.

  3. #3
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    Sick! 1X?

  4. #4
    J_K
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    Yes, 1x10 with 11-36 cassette and 26t or 28t chainring. I see no reasons for front derailleur when there is as small as 26t narrow wide chainrings available and I want to keep drivetrain as simple as possible.

  5. #5
    Harrumph
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    What's the A-C on your fork? I have Fatty frame #2 rolling around in my head and I think a "proper" length fork with more rake than most commercially available fork would help with some of the fatty handling issues.
    Slowly slipping to retrogrouchyness

  6. #6
    J_K
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    The A-C is 453mm. I did not want fork that's "too long".
    I did even consider 55mm rake, but I ditched that idea. Although, I'm now thinking of building alternative fork with same A-C and 55mm rake.

    What is your "proper" fork length?

  7. #7
    Harrumph
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    "Proper" being not suspension corrected for a frame that will never see a suspension fork.
    Slowly slipping to retrogrouchyness

  8. #8
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    Awesome stuff, keep it coming. How much does your fork weigh? What guage tubing did you use for the legs?

  9. #9
    J_K
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-reg View Post
    "Proper" being not suspension corrected for a frame that will never see a suspension fork.
    Yeah, I figured that out after posting. This frame will never see suspension fork.

    Quote Originally Posted by bikecycology View Post
    Awesome stuff, keep it coming. How much does your fork weigh? What guage tubing did you use for the legs?
    The fork with uncut steerer weighs 1208g, steerer is 350mm from the crown race seat to top, so about 150mm extra.
    The legs are 1", but I will leave it up to you to decide what gauge tubing to use.

  10. #10
    J_K
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    Small progress today, the front triangle and the chainstays are tacked and dropouts are brazed.

    I should have done the chainstays differently, but at least I know now what to do next time.





    Last edited by J_K; 01-18-2014 at 12:25 PM.

  11. #11
    Nemophilist
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    Quote Originally Posted by J_K View Post
    I should have done the chainstays differently, but at least I know now what to do next time.
    How so?
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  12. #12
    J_K
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrailMaker View Post
    How so?
    Bend less to avoid over bending when dimpled and offset mitering to the BB.

  13. #13
    J_K
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    Everything except the seatstays are now welded.
    I ended up spending way too much time positioning the frame on the vise, so I need to get good solid workstand for making positioning easier.

    My best welds so far, but still lots of room for improvement.
    This is first frame I have back purged and it seems to help a lot.







    Last edited by J_K; 01-18-2014 at 12:25 PM.

  14. #14
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    Very nice!! Welds look great!
    That fork is awesome. HUGE!
    I just did that non-offsetting of the chainstays thing on my 23rd frame...the newb mistakes never stop (at least for me...). Chainstays are the hardest part still for me...a struggle every time.

  15. #15
    J_K
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    Thanks!
    The fork is really huge, the same can be said about the rear end.

    For me, the hardest part is yet to come, the seatstays. I found that these round chainstays are a lot easier to do than the oval chainstays. Also keep in mind, I'm doing all the mitering by hand using templates.

  16. #16
    WIGGLER
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    Welds look great!!
    PAYASO 36er.....Live the Circus

  17. #17
    J_K
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    Not much happening here.
    The HT is reamed and faced, the BB is also chased and faced. I really love that Cyclus BB tool.
    The seatstay are also mitered, they proved to be as difficult as I had thought it would be.

    One thing I forgot to mention earlier.
    Biggest improvement on welding was changing to weld clockwise, previously I have mainly welded counterclockwise. When welding clockwise it is much easier to focus the arc on the unmitered tube.



    Last edited by J_K; 01-18-2014 at 12:26 PM.

  18. #18
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    +1 on the Cyclus BB facer/reamer, I got one after wasting money on an Ice tools one that broke after 2 frames. Welds look quite nice, not too hot, not too cool, good filler amount
    What welder settings are you using?
    I didn't tackle a fat bike until # 15, all those bends and getting the tires and the cranks and the chainrings to clear was a lot of work! The fat was easier than the knard though.
    That was tight.
    cheers
    andy walker

  19. #19
    J_K
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    About welder settings, no pulse, no foot pedal other than on/off switch. 35-40amps all joints except the SS-ST where I use about 27amps. I bet you can't use these setting on any other machine than my cheap chinese welder, I think it welds hotter than panel says.

    All the welding is done now, still need to cap the chainstays and the seatstays and add the cable guides and the bridge on the seatstays.
    Welding the seatstay was quite easy as there's some much room aroud the joints.

    welded


    Last edited by J_K; 01-18-2014 at 12:26 PM.

  20. #20
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    Yep, the settings don't match my Miller. I use 135amps for almost everything, 123a to go for something thin. 1pps, so whatever you're doing, keep it up! Nice looking welds however we get there.
    cheers
    andy walker

  21. #21
    J_K
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    The chainstays are capped, thanks for Clockwork Bikes for the idea!




    Still need to add the seatstay bridge.
    Last edited by J_K; 01-18-2014 at 12:27 PM.

  22. #22
    Nemophilist
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    Hey;

    I think the SS bridge is useful, but I do not plan to bridge the CS on any future Fat builds. Just collects too much leaf/mud/mung/snow when condition are soft. Contributes to FD icing, BB contamination and general messiness in the BB area. Not worth the hassle and I'm not sure it does anything substantive except take a lot of time and collect debris!
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  23. #23
    J_K
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    Yep, no plans for the CS bridge, but definitely needs the SS bridge.

  24. #24
    J_K
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    The frame is ready for the powder coating.

    Silver brazed the SS bridge, to keep the heat minimum and to avoid drawing the dropout faces inwards.


    Last edited by J_K; 01-18-2014 at 12:28 PM.

  25. #25
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    #5 SoFat

    Photos aren't showing up... how about a link to your Photobucket account?

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