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  1. #1
    Kosher Princess
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    [accent] Would you like a croissant? [/accent]

    Julie Racing Design

    I was hunting about the web for custom ideas and whatnot, and found this builder located in Garnay, France.

    I like some of his aesthetics, though wonder about the practicality of some of his design, for example:







    Anyone have experience with this builder and or builds?

    This is his Flickr.

  2. #2
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Natalie Portman
    Julie Racing Design

    I was hunting about the web for custom ideas and whatnot, and found this builder located in Garnay, France.

    I like some of his aesthetics, though wonder about the practicality of some of his design, for example:







    Anyone have experience with this builder and or builds?

    This is his Flickr.
    Cool stuff!
    As far as "practical" goes, seems fine to me. No "normal" but very functional and good looking.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  3. #3
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    That front cabe stop is going to go through cables/housing 100 times faster than a more traditional set up. And if that's a steel feeder tube going up the front mech, well that's going to be short lived as well.

    Internal routing is the Mullet of frame building. It was a bad idea the first time around, and it's still a bad idea.


    -Schmitty-

  4. #4
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    Nowt wrong with mullets. Lovely stuff, different.

  5. #5
    Framebuilder
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schmitty
    That front cabe stop is going to go through cables/housing 100 times faster than a more traditional set up. And if that's a steel feeder tube going up the front mech, well that's going to be short lived as well.

    Internal routing is the Mullet of frame building. It was a bad idea the first time around, and it's still a bad idea.


    -Schmitty-
    I keep hearing this, but I don't see why internal routing is bad. Takes more time to build the frame sure, but if the angles are good in the cable tunnels (and of course the frame builder has put the entrances/exits in the right spots), how is it any worse than a bike with full length housings and external guides?

    ps- I can see how the front der tube on the pictured bike will provide a perfect inlet for water. It looks like the tube is brass.....but it's still gonna fill up.

  6. #6
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Live Wire
    I keep hearing this, but I don't see why internal routing is bad. Takes more time to build the frame sure, but if the angles are good in the cable tunnels (and of course the frame builder has put the entrances/exits in the right spots), how is it any worse than a bike with full length housings and external guides?

    ps- I can see how the front der tube on the pictured bike will provide a perfect inlet for water. It looks like the tube is brass.....but it's still gonna fill up.
    I have not seen issues either. The main downside is actually fitting the cables can be difficult.

    The FD tube looks like it has a rubber seal around a plastic liner that extends to the limit of the cable travel. I would not be too concerned about water.

    Did you notice that this is a 29er with 410-430mm chainstays?
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  7. #7
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    Can't say I'm a fan of short chainstays or 6lb hardtails with more brass than all the door handles in my house, but it sure is purdy.
    No longer member of the bike industry nor society, so don't hassle me.

  8. #8
    Framebuilder
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    I have not seen issues either. The main downside is actually fitting the cables can be difficult.

    The FD tube looks like it has a rubber seal around a plastic liner that extends to the limit of the cable travel. I would not be too concerned about water.

    Did you notice that this is a 29er with 410-430mm chainstays?
    Yeah, I see the seals, but you know water will get past it eventually.

    I've been following this blog since he (maybe they?) started it, most of the stuff is 29ers....and very cool! I wish I could read French.

  9. #9
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    I'm a big fan of short chainstays, but I wonder if that bike could run a triple with full size (2.1 or bigger) tires? Seems like the derailleur would run into the tire when in the small ring.

  10. #10
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    The dude makes some crazy stuff. He's on veloartisinal pretty often. He uses flux covered rod too and what looks to be a map torch.

    -Schmitty-

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