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  1. #1
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    Info about the FXR

    Hi, Im looking for as much info on the FXR 2:1 as possible. I am seriously considering picking one up, either a new 08, or a year or two old lightly used. ANY info i could get, both good and bad, would be really helpful. It seems difficult to find much info on this bike. Anyone with experience with this bike, as i said both good or bad, i would love to hear from. And differences between the older (07) and the new also. I am 5 11" and i ride very gnarly technical trails here in massachussetts, rocks, roots, etc. Lots of climbing, lots of gnarly singletrack and descents. Trying to build it around 30 pounds, probably looking at a med frame. I have a bullit for wild stuff, and want to take this on longer epics. Comparing with the new blur lt, the titus el guapo, the intense 6.6, ellsworth moment, etc. Also would love to hear how foes warranty and CS is, as that is very important to me, and i hear the curnutt can be questionably reliable. Thanks!

  2. #2
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    mountain bike action did a write up on the bike. you can get the article from foes's website.

  3. #3
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    So far I have my FXR for 6mos now and I love it. No probs with the Curnutt(steel spring) so far and I am big guy.

    Get a fork with a lockout or travel adjustment because it will make a difference in climbing.

    To me the bike just feels right, very moto like. Which is what I like.

    If you get it don't forget to post some pictures.

  4. #4
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    The frame is super stiff, angles and geometry are spot on and they look awesome in the flesh. You absolutely have to demo one though because the shock is simply awful. This is my opinion and I know loads of folk love it. It really depends on how you want it to ride. As a tall 6" go anywhere XC bike its great, the platform does its job and the rig climbs well. BUt and this is a HUUGE but, if you are expecting a supple and plush ride ( as I did frm a 6" bike) you will probably go mad trying to get the shock to feel like a Fox or Avalanche etc. I tried everything and it is now sold. Had the eye to eye been a more sensible length then I would have absolutely kept it and change shock. I even considered an Avalanche but being base in the UK I put this in the too hard basket.
    The Curnut does what it says on the time but the platform is notchy. Over small ripples it knock like f%@k and feels like you back end is loose. My shock had been checked over thoroughly several times. I had the ITD and almost did the upgrade to the XTD.

    If Foes offered alternative dampers thay would be onto something because (as Mitch at Foes admitted) not everyone get on with the Curnut. It depends on where you have come from (bike-wise) I guess.

    In short...demo one to be sure or walk away

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by nzl62
    The frame is super stiff, angles and geometry are spot on and they look awesome in the flesh. You absolutely have to demo one though because the shock is simply awful. This is my opinion and I know loads of folk love it. It really depends on how you want it to ride. As a tall 6" go anywhere XC bike its great, the platform does its job and the rig climbs well. BUt and this is a HUUGE but, if you are expecting a supple and plush ride ( as I did frm a 6" bike) you will probably go mad trying to get the shock to feel like a Fox or Avalanche etc. I tried everything and it is now sold. Had the eye to eye been a more sensible length then I would have absolutely kept it and change shock. I even considered an Avalanche but being base in the UK I put this in the too hard basket.
    The Curnut does what it says on the time but the platform is notchy. Over small ripples it knock like f%@k and feels like you back end is loose. My shock had been checked over thoroughly several times. I had the ITD and almost did the upgrade to the XTD.

    If Foes offered alternative dampers thay would be onto something because (as Mitch at Foes admitted) not everyone get on with the Curnut. It depends on where you have come from (bike-wise) I guess.

    In short...demo one to be sure or walk away
    Like he said, geometry is spot on and bike rides great. Curnutt shock will take some getting use to. It wasn't meant for small bump compliance and climbs like a hardtail, you will feel the bumps. The shock REALLY shines though if you point it down the hill and get the bike moving at high speeds. The shock smoothes out tremendously and felt better than my TALAS 36 did through the chatter bumps. The rear end is very stiff and tracked well through rocky sections. I'm still getting use to the Curnutt and although at times it feels like the dampening is funky, its working because I've managed to keep the rubber side down on some of the OH Sh*t sections.

  6. #6
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    What chober says is fair and accurate. I think part of the problem is trying to make the Curnut behave like something else rather than accepting it as it is. Guilty as charged. Miss it all the same

  7. #7
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    Good job!

    I have a 07 FXR and I love it. The frame is extremely stiff, it climbs and descends well and I have yet to have a hard bottom out of the shock . Ya, the Curnutt shock takes some getting used too but it also needs to be broke in and alot of it is getting it set up right. I have the stock spring (you may need a softer one because the stock one is pretty stiff)with 50lbs of air in the preload and rebound set just past a little past the middle setting and it feels pretty plush to me. Part of the problem is that just pushing or bouncing on the bike the shock feels slow, even all the way out. Ya, I agree with the one off the previous reviewers, you should have a fork with a lockout but I have fork with a lockout on all my bikes, even my hard tails.

  8. #8
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    As some of the others have pointed out. Test ride one. The curnut is not for everyone. I would not recommend anyone buying a Foes without test riding one first

    I got a 07 FXR with the air shock. I guess its not as firm as the coil version but I would not call it plush. Seams like many riders who have the coil version are having problem getting the right spring for their weight/riding style.

    The shock is really sensitive to speed. As soon as the speed picks up it starts to become more plush. At low speed and rather smooth terrain the bike handles like an XC rig with 3-4" travel. At speed or drops it becomes a FR rig with 5-6" travel. This might sound really good but if you are used to a Cadillac smooth ride you will be disappointed.

    Today I rode it for the first time in really slippery conditions, wet rocks and roots. Since it was so slippery I road quite slow which caused the shock to be on the firm side. I hade a lot more problem with traction than I used to have with my old bike which was much more plush.

    The bike climbs like no other bike. Not sure why, but I知 clearing steep sections I would not even try before.

    The 08 air shock is supposed to be more responsive to small bumps. I really would like to try it.

    If you decide to buy one I would recommend getting a fork with some kind of platform. When I fist got the frame I built it up with my old fork with no platform. When I would go into a sharp turn or beam the fork would compress but not the rear since the G build up was to slow to make the curnutt react. I now have A Fox RLC and it makes the bike more balanced.

    I知 not really sure what to do with my frame. Sometimes it痴 just fantastic and sometimes I just whished for a more plush ride.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter E

    I got a 07 FXR with the air shock. I guess its not as firm as the coil version but I would not call it plush. Seams like many riders who have the coil version are having problem getting the right spring for their weight/riding style.

    The shock is really sensitive to speed. As soon as the speed picks up it starts to become more plush. At low speed and rather smooth terrain the bike handles like an XC rig with 3-4" travel. At speed or drops it becomes a FR rig with 5-6" travel. This might sound really good but if you are used to a Cadillac smooth ride you will be disappointed.

    The bike climbs like no other bike. Not sure why, but I知 clearing steep sections I would not even try before.

    Ya, I too have an 07 FXR and I agree the original coil was a little to stiff so I bought a lighter spring. (you could request a lighter spring at the time of purchase so you wouldn't have to buy a second spring) That helped out quite a bit. The problem is that they only have one spring softer than stock. At the time I weighed 180lbs and it worked out for me. Then when I gained a little weight I put the stock spring back on. I think the key to get it to be more plush is to use less air in the preload than the 65lbs that they recomend. But if your 170lbs or less I could see why the shock would feel to firm.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter E
    As some of the others have pointed out. Test ride one. The curnut is not for everyone. I would not recommend anyone buying a Foes without test riding one first

    I got a 07 FXR with the air shock. I guess its not as firm as the coil version but I would not call it plush. Seams like many riders who have the coil version are having problem getting the right spring for their weight/riding style.

    The shock is really sensitive to speed. As soon as the speed picks up it starts to become more plush. At low speed and rather smooth terrain the bike handles like an XC rig with 3-4" travel. At speed or drops it becomes a FR rig with 5-6" travel. This might sound really good but if you are used to a Cadillac smooth ride you will be disappointed.

    Today I rode it for the first time in really slippery conditions, wet rocks and roots. Since it was so slippery I road quite slow which caused the shock to be on the firm side. I hade a lot more problem with traction than I used to have with my old bike which was much more plush.

    The bike climbs like no other bike. Not sure why, but I知 clearing steep sections I would not even try before.

    The 08 air shock is supposed to be more responsive to small bumps. I really would like to try it.

    If you decide to buy one I would recommend getting a fork with some kind of platform. When I fist got the frame I built it up with my old fork with no platform. When I would go into a sharp turn or beam the fork would compress but not the rear since the G build up was to slow to make the curnutt react. I now have A Fox RLC and it makes the bike more balanced.

    I知 not really sure what to do with my frame. Sometimes it痴 just fantastic and sometimes I just whished for a more plush ride.
    This is exactly how I feel, at times the bike is amazing when you just let it loose and not touch the brakes. However, the areas to ride near my house there is alot of exposure and alot of riding on narrow cliffside sheer drop trails. I don't have the balls to just let the bike rip so I end up picking my way down the trail and that is the worst way to ride a Foes.

  11. #11
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    I have an 06 FXR and I love it. it handles well and the frame is stiff as all get out laterally. it rides plush enough for me, of course I weigh 245lbs so the shock is quite active with my weight whether I am going fast or slow. The bike does not feel exactly like any other full suspension bike I have ridden. the bike is a freak of nature, the FXR climbs like a hard tail with added traction but descends like a full on Freeride bike. I do not know how this is done with 6 inches of travel but it works. I have the heavier spring and I run the shock with about 70psi and it does everything well for me. However the FXR does best at speed and moderate jumps nothing above 6ft. The 2:1 ratio and philosophy makes sense. Once you get an FXR dialed in it is hands down one of the best all around bikes on the market. The only problem is , they do not make it in a 29er yet.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by dcarterdman
    The only problem is , they do not make it in a 29er yet.
    Wash your dirty, dirty whore mouth out with soap right now!

  13. #13
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    Super fun but weird..

    I usually ride a 27 lb 03 Turner 5 Spot with 5.3" on both ends so this is an apples to oranges comparison but the FXR shines in most respects.
    While the FXR has more travel and slacker geo it climbs allmost as well as the Spot on "normal" climbs (no hiding the extra 6 lbs though) but is far superior when out of the saddle, and maybe a little better on rough, steep climbs.
    I like the cornering better on the FXR, big hits it's better of course but the Curnut sometimes dismisses smaller bumps and ripples so I could see how people looking for the super push 6" ride might be dissapointed in the Curnut. The Curnut makes a ton of noise that take some getting used to, like the clicking of the curnut valving; and the too much rebound sound. One other thing I'm attributing to the Curnutt, it's harder to lift the front of this bike; on the flip side it's easier to keep the front tire on the ground on steeper climbs.
    Big guys beware during a call to Foes it was suggested that I was too heavy to be happy with the Curnut air at 210 lbs so give that some thought if you want to build it lighter because the steel coiled Curnut is pushing 3 lbs.

  14. #14
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    Anyone here tried a FXR with another shock than the Curnutt? Like a Fox or Marzocchi? How does it compare?
    "Some days even my lucky rocketship underpants won't help."
    Bill Watterson's "Calvin & Hobbes"

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Calvin-
    Anyone here tried a FXR with another shock than the Curnutt? Like a Fox or Marzocchi? How does it compare?
    Didn't have a 2:1 FXR, but had an FXR with a Fox DHX 5.0 coil and it was better...still not anywhere as good as a linkage-controlled bike (due to how the rate is controlled on those types of bikes). The FXR had a huge falling-rate, so the basic shocks like the vanilla RL (which I also had on there at the beginning) was very poor due to the fact that you'd need an extra-stiff spring to keep it from bottoming, but then it would ride very harshly on terrain. The curnutt type shocks circumvent this by increasing the damping through the travel (referred to as position sensitive), but it also doesnt' come close to the control/sensitivity afforded by a linkage-controlled bike. On the bigger foes bikes a lot of people have gone to avalanche shocks, which offer real high/low speed damping control, as well as depending on the IFP height/nitrogen charge and the shock bumper, a degree of progression at the end of the travel that helps to offset the sometimes falling-rate designs that foes produces. The question you have to ask you is, "what does all of this get me in the end?". In regards to the harsh travel, there are plenty of bikes out there that work just as well or better than the foes in all situations, and do not suffer from this problem. Apart from accomidating heavier riders,a low-leverage rate doesn't really do anything that can't be easily replicated by other means. A real low leverage rate means you need smaller incrimental changes in spring weight, and that is not really easy to do. Instead of 300, 350, 400lb and so on spring weights, you now need 275, 300, 325 and maybe even smaller incrimental changes to really nail someone's spring-rate on the bike. You also introduce more friction as the 2:1 works both ways, in other words a small amount of friction is easily overcome when the rate is higher like 3:1. You can get more fluid displacement with 2:1, but with curnutt shocks it's all for not, you simply don't get the benefit that you should of increased sensitivity/damping performance. You can also make up for this with a higher leverage ratio by increasing the piston diameter and fluid volume, and while there are limits to this, this is exactly what is gained by going to an avalanche shock on any suspension frame. Once you get well past 3:1 ratios you run into internal pressure problems and the internals have to be able to deal with the stress, but again you can offset this by using larger shocks/internals like avalanche does (in addition to being popular for Foes, they have also been popular for highly-leveraged bikes due to their much beefier internal construction and parts). Eventually of course there is a limit and you'll blow shock internals with too high of a leverage rate and require spring weights that simply aren't practical.

    Bottom line, with the curnutt it was a poor performer. Lots of people rationalize the poor performance, but bottom line was that it performed poor compared to most everything else (and most everything else cost less). With a DHX 5.0, it performed exactly as it should as a single pivot falling-rate bike. No suprises, and defintely better, but not up to the level of most everything else still. Maybe it "pedaled well" with the curnutt, but my friggin hardtail pedals well, and I didn't buy that for it's suspension performance. I buy FS bikes for their suspension performance.
    Last edited by Jayem; 09-25-2008 at 08:28 PM.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Calvin-
    Anyone here tried a FXR with another shock than the Curnutt? Like a Fox or Marzocchi? How does it compare?
    I've ridden my 2005 FXR with both the curnutt and a Fox AVA and liked both. For 2005, Foes offered both shocks as options, and I bought both the Curnutt and AVA to have a lighter weight option.

    Having an adjustable air volume, the AVA (air volume adjustement) allowed me to fine tune the progression of the suspension somewhat independantly of small bump sensitivity. The AVA was easily a pound lighter than the curnutt as well.

    After riding my FXR with the air shock and super light parts (got it down to 29 pounds with this build) I decided to go back to the Curnutt and have since retired the AVA and only use it now as a back up to the Curnutt.

    The Curnutt shock is really perfect for the FXR allowing it to pedal very well, without bobbing. It climbs steep, rocky trails better than any bike I've ever ridden - all the while remaining very plush. The 2005 FXR with 5.75" travel feels more plush than many bikes with more travel (Moment/Nomad).

    Having tried Fox AVA's, RP3's, RP23's, Manitou Swingers, 5th Elements - Curnutt outperforms them all. The FXR is an amazing bike - made even more so by having the Curnutt on it.
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  17. #17
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    Having tried Fox AVA's, RP3's, RP23's, Manitou Swingers, 5th Elements
    Having tried curnutts, fox avas, rp3s, rp23s and 5th elements (in addion to may others),
    a fox DHX 5.0 coil easily outperforms all of them. Comparing to air-shocks and 5th elements isn't really much of a comparission. The 5th element and swinger particularily suffer from the same problem as the curnutt, poor suspension performance compared to most everything else. The difference between my rp23 and my avalanche is night and day, the difference between the RP23 and my DHX coil is also night and day. I've had the pleasure (or sometimes displeasure) of owning fox vanillas, vanilla rl, vanilla rcs, romics, multiple DHX coils(5), DHX air, RP3, RP23, stratos helix expert, 5th element, avalanche chubby, and the curnutt. Out of the coil shocks, the curnutt stands out as the poorest coil shock, but I suppose if you're comparing to RP23s and RP3s (fairly overdamped shocks usually with more initial resistance to movement and usually pretty high amounts of rebound/compression damping) then yeah, it might be a bit better, but the simple fact is that you can do better...so much better. Compared to other coil shocks (that usually weigh a pound less too), it's one of the few situations where upgrading to a more expensive shock actually degrades the performance compared to something like the DHX coil. The DHX coil is no wonder-shock, it's just that the curnutt is that bad.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Having tried curnutts, fox avas, rp3s, rp23s and 5th elements (in addion to may others),
    a fox DHX 5.0 coil easily outperforms all of them. Comparing to air-shocks and 5th elements isn't really much of a comparission. The 5th element and swinger particularily suffer from the same problem as the curnutt, poor suspension performance compared to most everything else. The difference between my rp23 and my avalanche is night and day, the difference between the RP23 and my DHX coil is also night and day. I've had the pleasure (or sometimes displeasure) of owning fox vanillas, vanilla rl, vanilla rcs, romics, multiple DHX coils(5), DHX air, RP3, RP23, stratos helix expert, 5th element, avalanche chubby, and the curnutt. Out of the coil shocks, the curnutt stands out as the poorest coil shock, but I suppose if you're comparing to RP23s and RP3s (fairly overdamped shocks usually with more initial resistance to movement and usually pretty high amounts of rebound/compression damping) then yeah, it might be a bit better, but the simple fact is that you can do better...so much better. Compared to other coil shocks (that usually weigh a pound less too), it's one of the few situations where upgrading to a more expensive shock actually degrades the performance compared to something like the DHX coil. The DHX coil is no wonder-shock, it's just that the curnutt is that bad.
    It's no secret you hate the Curnutt, Jayem.

    You've gone out of your way. Way, far out of your way. 61 posts lambasting the Curnutt, out of your way, to get your message across.

    http://www.google.com/search?q=jayem...hl=en&filter=0

    Why not make it 62? We're all ears!

  19. #19
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    No doubt, dude give it a rest.

    Last winter I had my Curnutt rebuilt, and Brent answered and shot the $%# for a bit and then handed me over to the guy acutally doing the rebuild. He aasked what I rode, weight and whatnot to setup the shock perfectly so when I received it I was dialed in. CS from Margo up front to all the guys in the shop has been great super helpful.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by X-FXR
    No doubt, dude give it a rest.

    Last winter I had my Curnutt rebuilt, and Brent answered and shot the $%# for a bit and then handed me over to the guy acutally doing the rebuild. He aasked what I rode, weight and whatnot to setup the shock perfectly so when I received it I was dialed in. CS from Margo up front to all the guys in the shop has been great super helpful.
    You're replying to a post from a year ago and saying to "give it a rest"? Thanks for the laugh.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  21. #21
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    Ha! Yeah, the one year anniversary for this dead horse isn't until Saturday. A little early to the party even.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    You're replying to a post from a year ago and saying to "give it a rest"? Thanks for the laugh.
    HAHA just couldn't let it go could ya?!!
    "You go up the hill, you go down the hill."

  23. #23
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    foes fxr

    [QUOTE=Bentley78]Hi, Im looking for as much info on the FXR 2:1 as possible. I am seriously considering picking one up, either a new 08, or a year or two old lightly used. ANY info i could get, both good and bad, would be really helpful. It seems difficult to find much info on this bike. Anyone with experience with this bike, as i said both good or bad, i would love to hear from. And differences between the older (07) and the new also. I am 5 11" and i ride very gnarly technical trails here in massachussetts, rocks, roots, etc. Lots of climbing, lots of gnarly singletrack and descents. Trying to build it around 30 pounds, probably looking at a med frame. I have a bullit for wild stuff, and want to take this on longer epics. Comparing with the new blur lt, the titus el guapo, the intense 6.6, ellsworth moment, etc. Also would love to hear how foes warranty and CS is, as that is very important to me, and i hear the curnutt can be questionably reliable. Thanks![/QUOTEiI have got a 06 foes fxr with a currnutt ITD shock it ace if the 06 is enythink to go by the 08 should b the dogs bbbbb

  24. #24
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    Foes FXR 2:1 ratio 6 inches of travel

    I have an 06 Foes FXR 2:1 large I am 5'11 and weigh 250lbs. I have the basic curnutt shock with a 450lbs spring and this bike rocks. It climbs like a hardtail but when you point it downhill it really does its thing. i live in Phoenix AZ so all of our trails are technical and extremely rocky. this bike climbs so well it is hard to believe it has 6 inches of travel. Once you have owned this bike for a while you will realize the benefit of a laterally stiff bike. Every bike you ride after you have owned one of these will feel like a noodle. As for the build mine weighs about 33lbs I have mavic 819 rim running tubless, with ck hub rear and a hope hub front, XTR 960 cranks, Sram XO everything else, Saint brakes, FSA DH carbon fiber bar and a Fox RC36 Talas and a Maverick speedball seatpost with remote. My only experience with the curnutt shock is the coil version and I have not done anything to but put air in it for 3 years. I guess I should probably send it in for service sometime, but I probably will not do that till I get my B-29 or Titus Rockstar haven' t decided yet. On top of that I have never had to even put a wrench on the pivots or adjust them and I am a big boy. Parking lot test does this bike no justice, you have to get it on the trail.

    The down side is the frame is heavy (8lbs) and I get chainsuck every now and then, but that may be worn out chain rings. I have heard some mention of a clunk with the curnutt shock but that must be with the Air version, I do not get any clunk sound from my shock. Outside of that I think that about covers it.

    If you buy one, you may be stuck with Foes forever, because I really think they are way ahead of the curve when it comes to suspension. Look at the history first long travel downhill bike, Curnutt inventor of SPV shocks, now the 2:1 ratio which if you notice a lot of manufacturers are slowly evolving their designs to. That is why I am considering the Titus Rockstar for my 29er because it has a 2:1 ratio. There are a few other brands that look to be doing the same, the concept just makes sense.

  25. #25
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    yeah the currnutt shock is ace foes must use black magic or voodoo becouse i have had many bikes and air shocks but foes currnutt shock seems to have it spot on fit and forget.dont know how it works but it pedalls really well. its use 2inch frame movement to 1inch shock travel ratio is the way forward.live long and prossper mr foes man

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