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  1. #1
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    Fox RLC vs RC2 to match Curnutt Air?

    I've read a couple posts where people say that Fork "x" cannot match the performance of the Curnutt so the ride wasn't as good as can be etc etc.. I think I've read a post where someone said the Fox RLC was better than RC2 to match the Curnutt Air. Just wondering if there is any truth to this. I'm wondering because I am thinking of buying a new fork and if I should get the 2013 RC2s or 2012 RLC..both are available at my LBS.

    What do most of you use for forks? My bike is a 2010 FXR wiht Curnutt XTD Air. I have a 2009/2010 Float R right now. Thinking of getting a TALAS and TBH it's mainly because I wanted a black fork. lol

  2. #2
    Dirt Rag Extraordinaire
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    Quote Originally Posted by jon777 View Post
    What do most of you use for forks? My bike is a 2010 FXR wiht Curnutt XTD Air. I have a 2009/2010 Float R right now. Thinking of getting a TALAS and TBH it's mainly because I wanted a black fork. lol
    Can't really comment on the Curnutt Air directly, not a big fan of all-air shocks/forks, tbh. I have a Curnutt w/Ti 350 coil, and use a 55 ETA fork. Travel adjust is very handy, I'll never get an XC/AM without it, I use it every time I climb. My local trails are all uninterrupted climbs followed by a long decent, so it's perfect for travel adjust. I've owned Marzocchi AM2 w/ETA, 36 Talas (air sprung), and the 55 ETA's, and these have been the best forks of the three. The AM2 second, 36 Talas last, both of which were on a Heckler. The two Marzocchi forks use an oil/coil spring, combined with an air chamber to adjust sag. In my experience, this design offers a far superior ride than an air spring; compliant, smooth, linear feel. Air forks might compliment your Curnutt Air, I'm not sure, but I do know they can feel quite harsh, and require regular servicing/maintenance. I had Z1's back in the day when there was nothing else even close in performance, so I admit I'm biased towards Marzocchi. In my opinion, Fox are hugely over-rated; they require constant attention to tune perfectly, and without regular servicing they begin to feel like sh!t very quickly. Contrary to the marketing hype, they don't perform any better than most other comparitively expensive products out on the trail, where it really matters.

    Good luck, and good choice on the FXR.
    "You go up the hill, you go down the hill."

  3. #3
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    Hmm.. thanks.. I've read quite a bit of stuff that you've said about Fox Forks.. I don't know.. I guess I'll just ride what I have for now. It's just that my LBS offered me a 2012 TALAS 36 RLC for about $830. A lot of people complained about the RLC but I read one post that said the RLC matched the Curnutt better than the RC2. $830 sounds like a good deal but it really was a sh!t fork as what a lot of people have said, then that's $830 too much even if it's discounted.

  4. #4
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    The 36 Talas I had were the first ones, with the brown lowers and the dinky Talas adjustment you had to manually wind down with the knob, '06 model I think. They were alright, pretty stiff, but I just couldn't dial 'em in properly. I remember a couple of runs that were just awesome, where the forks felt nice and juicy, but that was very rare. Most of the time they just felt harsh, and they ramped-up really quickly, I don't think I ever got more than 4" travel out of them, far less than the advertised 6" anyway. It seemed to me like they required servicing so often, that by the time you've properly dialed them in the actual ride characteristics of the forks had already changed simply due to usage. This meant you were constantly f&%king around with them, trying to get 'em to feel better. Tbh, I'm not very good at dialling-in forks, I've grown up with oldschool coi-oil forks that never required fine tuning; you get the right springs, adjust the rebound, and go riding, that's it. The modern coil-oil/air forks have simply substituted the coil change with an air chamber for sag, which also works really well imo. I've never been trail riding with any other Talas fork, but I have been on a quick little street ride with a later model (the grey ones, I think you own 'em?) 36 Talas out the back of my lbs, and I must admit they felt better than mine; more plush, and they felt like they had more travel.

    I like to slam Fox because they're so outrageously over-hyped. It makes me sick to see here on mtbr.com the way they begin 'pro reviews' with, "The Van 160 is an incredible fork..." and then go on to endlessly quote marketing info ad-nausium. It's difficult to discern between the actual 'review' and the straight-out Fox marketing speil deftly woven into it. Sorry, but that's NOT an objective review, and if it's not objective, it's not interesting or informative. To the reviewer's credit, however, he's just following orders from the Mtbr.com marketing dept, so he needn't take the criticism personally. Hey, I'm not getting paid, so I can say what I like. No doubt he actually does like the 36 Vans, they're one Fox fork I have always wanted to try myself, and would probably recommend to any fellow FXR owner on reputation alone.

    Look, Fox products are OK, I liked the DHX 5.0 coil on my Heckler, but it didn't perform any better or worse than the 5th Element it replaced (due to a dodgy service). Back in the day Fox had a lot of problems regarding dodgy seals and other reliability issues. I had some RLC130's and they leaked oil from day one, through the rebound knob at the bottom of the lowers. I remember taking the forks back to the lbs, I had them laying flat in the floor pan of my car, and within 10 mins they'd leaked a big puddle of oil in my car, straight through the fork seals. I know a lot of other people who ahd similar issues. And don't even get me started on RS, those Judy's were killers, I'm not the only one to have been hospitalised on account of them snapping like toothpicks. I appreciate mtb tech has evolved significantly since the 90's, and most products are safe and reliable now, but I won't ever forget being used as a crash test dummy by engineers who should've known better in the first place.
    Last edited by m0ngy; 07-08-2012 at 05:18 AM.
    "You go up the hill, you go down the hill."

  5. #5
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    An old dirtmag review of the FXR (Oct 2008) didnt like the Talas with the Curnutt Air...but then Steve Jones at dirtmag doesnt like Talas (or travel adjust forks in general).

    My Van 36R works very nicely with the Curnutt Air on my FXR. Was 'tweaked' a little bit when serviced by Dave at Stendec in the UK. This was to avoid the negative aspects of how teh fork handled and to improve it. No extra charge on top of the service. Not bad at all from a World Cup DH suspension tech!

    Personally, I've never liked Talas and don't feel I'm missing out by not being able to drop the front end. I once had a Pike U-turn but to be honest the time it took to wind down and wind back up again was a PITA. I'm perfectly happy with steering a full length 160mm fork.

    ...BUT if it's *only* for the colur that you might get the Talas, then look around, there are definitely black Float 36's around - i.e. as OE on certain bikes. (For me, $830 is not at all tempting for a Talas; but it's your choice of course)

    Also, have you thought about a BOS Deville fork? Mmmmm....

  6. #6
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    Hmm.. well, my main query was regarding RLC vs RC2 damper. I have heard from other users though that the TALAS seems to suck compared to the Float. Maybe I will just paint my Float black.

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