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  1. #1
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    ... and if we just ... first ride impressions on Foes XTD fork

    First off, I have to say I'm a big fan of the Curnutt shock that Foes makes fr their frames. I you haven't ridden a Curnutt, it is far different than the 5th element or manitou SPV lines. The compression and rebound damping change throughout the stroke of the shock, which give the shock a supple yet lively feel.

    Now for my impressions onf the new XTD Fork. Yes it is expensive. I shouldn't have afforded it, but I am glad I did.

    It has slider tubes that rival the size of the Monster T, a six bolt lower crown and a four bolt upper crown. It is very stout. It weighs 10.1 pounds, with the axle, hub, stem and all, or about 8 pounds without all the stuff. It has 8.5 inches of travel.

    The fork is like no other on the market. When you compress the forks against the ground, out of the box, they feel very soft, like the spring is 1/2 the rate it should be. Once I got it on the bike, I pedaled it around the driveway, rolled off a few stairs. It feels very different than any other forks. It feels like my Curnutt rear shock.

    In the first 1/3 of it's travel, the rebound is fairly slow, though the mid stroke damping is much lighter and lively. The compression of the stable platform is smooth and supple, yet pedaling doesn't make it pogo very much. And braking doesn't cause it to dive so much either.

    I decided to test it out on a downhill trail which has about 40 or so railroad ties, which drop off anywhere from 1-3 feet. Loose rocks, off camber turns, etc, included. The small rocks and undulations provided just enough feedback to my arms, allowing me to sense the terrain I was traveling over. The small RR tie drops, waterbars, and rocks were leveled out. The faster I would go, the smoother it got. Hitting loose rocks wasn't an issue. The front simply rolled over them, not even kicking the front end around. The wheel also tracks incredibly well, better than my F1xl, better than my old Stratos Superstar, better than my old Jr. T. It is a much different feeling than a typical DH fork.

    At the end of the run, there is an old cement pump house (looks more like a bunker), which drops about 7 feet to a slight downhill landing. Typically, you travel 15 feet across before touching down. And that is what the front did. Touch down. Ever so lightly, I feel more impact when I roll my singlespeed off a curb.

    I can't wait until this thing breaks in, it can only get better! Here are some pics:

    Oh yeah, The steerer tube is internally threaded, so no more starnuts!

    -katana
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  2. #2
    Cynical Bystander
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    Dude....I hate you. That is such a pimp fork, I wish I had it, lol. Im amazed at how fast you got it consideirng you only were talking about ordering it a day or two ago. Good job man, enjoy that beast!
    Tony
    is making a comeback.

    Turns out that five years of not mountain biking, really makes one strive to get back to it.

  3. #3
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    next day air

    Quote Originally Posted by COmtbiker12
    Dude....I hate you. That is such a pimp fork, I wish I had it, lol. Im amazed at how fast you got it consideirng you only were talking about ordering it a day or two ago. Good job man, enjoy that beast!
    The shop just got one in, and when I chuncked down 2 months rent for a front end, I had to spend the extra $50 for next day delivery. I'm lookin forward to visit northstar and whistler!
    Last edited by Katana; 06-14-2004 at 12:32 AM.

  4. #4
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    hm that forks looks good!
    thanks for the writeup did you ever have the chance to try out a Avalanche fork?
    if so, how do they compare?


    good to see those forks are finally available, i started to think they are an urban myth

  5. #5
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    For some reason that fork look different than the foes one I saw. Nothing structural just that there was a big ol' foes logo and it was colored. Man, sweet fork though
    "Better safe than scarry"

    www.3dmtb.net

  6. #6
    a'buh?
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    probably took the logos off 'eh? (I'm trying out being Canadian for a day...hey, I'm gonna go drop off a cliff, bye )

  7. #7
    Jm.
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    I probably shouldn't buy a curnutt shock (financially) but I am.
    I know in my heart that Ellsworth bikes are more durable by as much as double. AND they are all lighter...Tony Ellsworth

  8. #8
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    Avy & logo

    Right, I took the logo off, I like the clean look, plus the sticker had some lame carbon fiber pattern on it (to make up for the fact that they used white plastic gaurds instead of the real bling - carbon).

    I did a parking lot test with an Avy last year. They are very nice, but how much can be tested when pedaling around flat cement? I didn't think the Avy had as much stable platform as the Foes does, and I have about 30 minutes of climbing before I get to the fun parts of the hills.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katana
    Right, I took the logo off, I like the clean look, plus the sticker had some lame carbon fiber pattern on it (to make up for the fact that they used white plastic gaurds instead of the real bling - carbon).

    I did a parking lot test with an Avy last year. They are very nice, but how much can be tested when pedaling around flat cement? I didn't think the Avy had as much stable platform as the Foes does, and I have about 30 minutes of climbing before I get to the fun parts of the hills.
    Nice review.

    BTW: Why carbon bars for downhill?? Just asking because I've snapped Monkey Lights on my "xc" rig before. I would never put those on my Bullit.

  10. #10
    /dev/null
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    Quote Originally Posted by MRfire
    Nice review.

    BTW: Why carbon bars for downhill?? Just asking because I've snapped Monkey Lights on my "xc" rig before. I would never put those on my Bullit.
    MonkeyLite DH's are actually stronger than comperable aluminum bars.

    If you inspect it and are careful with installation, you should have no problems.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MRfire
    .........................Why carbon bars for downhill?? Just asking because I've snapped Monkey Lights on my "xc" rig before. .......................
    stop wrecking so much.....


  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by .WestCoastHucker.
    stop wrecking so much.....

    Hah, ya right - I'd have to quit and become a roadie!

    And that will NEVER happen...

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