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  1. #1
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    Curnutt Air vs Coil

    I'm getting ready to pull the trigger on an XCT 5. But before I do I want to make sure I'm getting the right shock. I'm leaning toward the coil w/ steel spring because I'm not worried about weight and have read that the coil is more adjustable which I prefer. But want to see if anyone might be able to provide some comparisons/contrasts between the Curnutt air and coil shock.

    Any input would be greatly appreciated!

  2. #2
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    From my experience the coil isn't as adjustable as you think.
    Due to the 2.1 ratio, the spring size difference of 50lbs is way to big. Work out the maths, if a std 3:1 shock has springs at 50lb intervals, the 2:1 ratio needs a smaller step between sizes.

    Go for the Air, that way you can dial the sag in as you want rather than what the springs dictate.

    For example, I had a 300 supplied with the FXR, too firm. I then got hold of a 250, too soft. A 275 would have been spot on.

  3. #3
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    Customized

    three things I've learned;
    1) At 200 lbs Foes discouraged me from buying the air shock for the FXR, so ask them 1st.
    2)If you want it to be plush tell them before you buy and, like mine, they can do at least 4 different things to make it more plush; night and day difference.
    3) Foes' weight chart for the spring rate had my 200 lb weight on the border between 300lb and 350 lb coil, when I sent my shock in for the rebuild with the unmarked coil they tested it and found it to be a 250 lb and said there wasn't evidence of excessive bottoming so they advised me to keep the lighter coil, so if you want it plush ask them about a lighter coil. Like nz162 said the 50 lb spread in spring weight has a bigger effect on a 2:1 leverage bike, fortunatley if you go with a lighter spring you can overcome the issue by increasing pressure or dialing in the bottom out ramp on one end, or increasing the Curnutt valve pressure on the starting end, or both, infinite adjustment if you take the time. Go slow, small adjustments make a noticable difference so do your base tuning at a section of trail that will allow you to repeat the test with every adjustment.
    When I bought the bike (used) it was snapier than my 5" Turner, but the ride was harsh on ripples and the "bump" through the frame from the valve opening was annoying. The bike is now very plush on all size bumps and while you can hear the valve opening the "bump" through the frame is gone, while not quite as snapy, it still rewards aggressive pedaling but is slightly more slugish on long intermediat climbs
    Last edited by slowrider; 01-27-2009 at 11:14 AM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by slowrider
    fortunatley if you go with a lighter spring you can overcome the issue by increasing pressure or dialing in the bottom out ramp on one end, or increasing the Curnutt valve pressure on the starting end, or both, infinite adjustment if you take the time.
    True, but should point out that it's not optimal and it adds more compression damping than is necessary for the absolute best performance. Best is to get the right spring, then set the damping, but barring that air could be the way to go. I'm in between spring sizes on my avalanche shock and looking for the right spring right now, it doesn't matter what coil shock you're talking about though, the correct spring rate is better and foes really should offer springs in 25 or 15lb incriments for their 2:1 leverage.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  5. #5
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    Cool...thanks for all the feedback

    Quote Originally Posted by slowrider
    1) At 200 lbs Foes discouraged me from buying the air shock for the FXR, so ask them 1st.
    Wonder why Foes discouraged you against the air shock because of your weight? I weigh @ 200 lbs as well so looks more and more like coil is the way to go.

    And as far as what has been said here and in several other threads about the Curnutt being harsh or rough, I'm not worried. I currently own a Spec Epic set up about as firm as I could get it, both front and rear, for racing and I use it as my everyday bike too since it's my only bike. So every other FS should feel like a Cadillac compared to my Epic. I may decide to move down to a 250lb spring but to start I think I'll try a 300lb spring or what Foes recommends on the XCT 5 based on my weight.

    OK I know that Ti is a superior mat'l choice for suspension springs...but not for my wallet. But I would seriously consider buying one instead of the steel spring if there is a vast improvement in performance.

    Has anyone ridden both the steel and Ti springs and if so how do they compare?

    Again thanks for the info

  6. #6
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    Cheaper option

    As stated I like my Curnutt now but you could save considerable weight and money by ordering your XCT5 with a DHX Air, I tried to buy one for my 06 fxr but the Foes adaptor makes the DHX 1" too long.

  7. #7
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    Some info I found on Ti vs. steel springs...

    http://www.coilspring.com/performance/why_titanium/

    http://www.coilspring.com/performanc..._titanium.html

    http://www.coilspring.com/performanc..._vs_steel.html

    And Brett Foes interview below. It's 9 min long and he talks about the Curnutt shock specifics @ 6:45 min into the vid.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZHXCm4pdFY

    So the XCT-5 is on order. Should arrive in a couple weeks and probably be at least a month before I complete the build and hit the trails. I'll post some pics and my opinion on the bike after some serious play time. As far as the shock I selected...you'll just have to wait and see...

  8. #8
    AnnaZed
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    sgill32, you should contact us at Foes about this.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgill32
    I'm getting ready to pull the trigger on an XCT 5. But before I do I want to make sure I'm getting the right shock. I'm leaning toward the coil w/ steel spring because I'm not worried about weight and have read that the coil is more adjustable which I prefer. But want to see if anyone might be able to provide some comparisons/contrasts between the Curnutt air and coil shock.

    Any input would be greatly appreciated!
    You should get the air shock. It's much more adjustable - without the added cost of buying multiple springs, should you not get it right the first time.

    With the 2:1 leverage ratio, your weight should not be a problem. You run far less air pressure in this shock then others. At 200 pounds you might need 110 psi in the shock.

    I currently own 2 Curnutt coil-equipped bikes and had the opportunity to do a long test ride on a Curnutt Air equipped bike this last weekend. The air shock rips! It doesn't bob, is super plush and just glued to the ground. I was impressed.
    Stupid, but sometimes witty. Occasionally brilliant. Slow and fat though.

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  10. #10
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    Done Deal

    I appreciate the advice but I went ahead and ordered the frame. It's absolutely amazing! I was going to hold off on pics until after the build but too excited to show it off. Don't know if you can tell in the pics but the orange is metallic and it looks really bad ass in the sun.

    DSC00279.JPG

    LARGE FRAME -- Weighs just over 8lbs

    DSC00287.JPG

    DSC00289.JPG

    CURNUTT XTD W/ TI SPRING

    AnnaZed I'm sure you remember this one, picked it up thru Adrenaline Bikes (great guys BTW). Got it last week. And I really like the two bends in the top tube on the '09 vs the swooped top tube. Gives it a more aggressive look.

    So cat's out of the bag now as to the shock I selected. I went Ti coil over vs the air because I've always owned air shocks and I've always wanted a Foes with the coil shock. I actually have the bike completely built except for the rear brake. I was a knucklehead and ordered one with too short of a hose. But let me tell you this thing is so damn sweet looking. And I've taken it for a spin around my neighborhood jumping off curbs and stuff and really like how it feels so far. Nothing will compare to getting it out on the trail though...and I'm so excited I can't wait.

    I should get the new rear brake this week. I'll post some more pics along with build list when I get it all together.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgill32
    I appreciate the advice but I went ahead and ordered the frame. It's absolutely amazing! I was going to hold off on pics until after the build but too excited to show it off. Don't know if you can tell in the pics but the orange is metallic and it looks really bad ass in the sun.

    DSC00279.JPG

    LARGE FRAME -- Weighs just over 8lbs

    DSC00287.JPG

    DSC00289.JPG

    CURNUTT XTD W/ TI SPRING

    AnnaZed I'm sure you remember this one, picked it up thru Adrenaline Bikes (great guys BTW). Got it last week. And I really like the two bends in the top tube on the '09 vs the swooped top tube. Gives it a more aggressive look.

    So cat's out of the bag now as to the shock I selected. I went Ti coil over vs the air because I've always owned air shocks and I've always wanted a Foes with the coil shock. I actually have the bike completely built except for the rear brake. I was a knucklehead and ordered one with too short of a hose. But let me tell you this thing is so damn sweet looking. And I've taken it for a spin around my neighborhood jumping off curbs and stuff and really like how it feels so far. Nothing will compare to getting it out on the trail though...and I'm so excited I can't wait.

    I should get the new rear brake this week. I'll post some more pics along with build list when I get it all together.
    NICE! Post build pics when you're done.
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  12. #12
    AnnaZed
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    Ah yes, I know that frame. For those on the forum I don't know how to describe it, but that color is so much more dynamic than it looks in that photo. Please send me photos of your build.

  13. #13
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    Ready to roll

    Build List:

    - 2009 Magura Thor 140mm Fork w/ Maxel 360
    - Formula Oro K24 Disc Brakes (180mm front/ 160mm rear disc)
    - FSA V Drive MegaExo Crank-Set
    - Shimano XTR Cassette
    - SRAM PC 991 Cross-step Chain
    - SRAM X7 Rear Derailleur
    - SRAM X9 Front Derailleur
    - SRAM X0 Grip Shifters
    - ODI Lock-On Grips
    - Spank Spike 777 Handle Bar
    - Nuke Proof Warhead 90mm Stem
    - Sunline V-One AM Headset
    - Thompson Elite Seat Post
    - WTB Pure V Race Saddle
    - Time XS Carbon Pedals
    - Spinergy Xyclone Wheels
    - WTB ExiWolf 2.3 Race Tires
    - Slime Tubes

    DSC00318.JPG

    DSC00312.JPG

    DSC00329.JPG

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgill32
    Build List:

    - 2009 Magura Thor 140mm Fork w/ Maxel 360
    - Formula Oro K24 Disc Brakes (180mm front/ 160mm rear disc)
    - FSA V Drive MegaExo Crank-Set
    - Shimano XTR Cassette
    - SRAM PC 991 Cross-step Chain
    - SRAM X7 Rear Derailleur
    - SRAM X9 Front Derailleur
    - SRAM X0 Grip Shifters
    - ODI Lock-On Grips
    - Spank Spike 777 Handle Bar
    - Nuke Proof Warhead 90mm Stem
    - Sunline V-One AM Headset
    - Thompson Elite Seat Post
    - WTB Pure V Race Saddle
    - Time XS Carbon Pedals
    - Spinergy Xyclone Wheels
    - WTB ExiWolf 2.3 Race Tires
    - Slime Tubes

    DSC00318.JPG

    DSC00312.JPG

    DSC00329.JPG
    Great looking bike! Can't wait to get my new fxr.
    Stupid, but sometimes witty. Occasionally brilliant. Slow and fat though.

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  15. #15
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    Thanks. Looking forward to seeing some pics of your FXR!

  16. #16
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    Upgraded already

    Decided to throw on a set of DT Swiss EX1750's and they belong on this bike. Should'a did this in the first place but the Xyclones are going to good use on my Epic.

    DSC00365.JPG

    DSC00355.JPG

    DSC00362.JPG

    DSC00359.JPG

    DSC00360.JPG

    I've only had the chance to ride it twice so far. Want to break it in good and do some serious riding on this bad mofo before I post any comments on how it performs. I will say this, the first two times out I was grinning from ear to ear. I'll post a review in a few months.

  17. #17
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    That thing is damn sexy, looks great.

  18. #18
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    What is up with the long coller on the spring?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by kntr
    What is up with the long coller on the spring?
    My guess would be because the threads on the shock body probably don't go down far enough for a narrow collar like on the FXR.

  20. #20
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    Pics from 3 shocks fitting 2.1
    steel spring
    Ti springs (2 coils: 150 ounds then 250 & 350 pound springs)
    & the best one Air Schock
    Attached Images Attached Images

  21. #21
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    Little late here but I'm 240 and ride an XCT-5 with air shock. Works great everywhere, up, down, flat, smooth, bumpy, whatever. Tuning makes all the difference. It is entirely possibly to set the shock up incorrectly and completely eff it up. Set it up right and you will more than likely be a happy camper!

  22. #22
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    just to add that the clip on the blue reservoir is not put properly on my air shock picture. This wrong way did some clinc! clanc! STRANGE NOISE.
    I change it clipping the cylinder closer to the end or the black tape (left side) and air channel.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by missfoesquebec
    just to add that the clip on the blue reservoir is not put properly on my air shock picture. This wrong way did some clinc! clanc! STRANGE NOISE.
    I change it clipping the cylinder closer to the end or the black tape (left side) and air channel.
    thats where the bracket is suppose to go. my Air on my RS7 was mounted at the base near the hose on the reservoir.


    man, i cant imagine the stiction that 4.5" stroke shock feels...my 3" stroke RS7 shock feels ridiculously sticky!

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by deadatbirth
    ...man, i cant imagine the stiction that 4.5" stroke shock feels...my 3" stroke RS7 shock feels ridiculously sticky!...
    Length of travel of the shock should not influence "stiction", all other things being set up correctly. A lower leverage ratio (eg 2:1 vs 3:1) means a longer travel shock for the same wheel travel, but also results in lower air pressures, and therefore lower seal tensions required to prevent leakage.


  25. #25
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    Hey SGill, I'm still waiting for your report on the ride! It's been five months! Spill it as I'm in the market for a FXR as well!!

    -Rob
    "No, you're going to be promoted to GLG-20."

  26. #26
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    Sag setting

    Hey everyone,

    I know this is a little off topic but I didn't want to start a new thread. My question is can someone tell me what the sag should be on the XTD air? I know the on the manual for my XCT it states that the coil shock sag should be 3/8". Does this apply for the XTD air as well?

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by winerdiner29er
    Hey everyone,

    I know this is a little off topic but I didn't want to start a new thread. My question is can someone tell me what the sag should be on the XTD air? I know the on the manual for my XCT it states that the coil shock sag should be 3/8". Does this apply for the XTD air as well?
    Usually 25% of stroke is a good rule of thumb - but I run different pressures depending on what I'm doing (higher pressure for longer xc rides, lower pressure when I'm not climbing as much. Play with it and find out what works for you.
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles
    Usually 25% of stroke is a good rule of thumb - but I run different pressures depending on what I'm doing (higher pressure for longer xc rides, lower pressure when I'm not climbing as much. Play with it and find out what works for you.
    Thanks Iheart, so 3/4" of sag should be a good starting point? The problem I'm running into is I'm running 65PSI in both the main chamber and the bottoming chamber. I'm having a heck of a time getting the sag right, and I can't let anymore air out per Foes's recomendations. I weigh 180 with out gear so I would think that I wouldnt have to run the shock in it's lowest reccomended pressure to get the sag where it should be. If I put any more air in the shock there is no way I could get the full travel of the shock. It's confusing me to no end right now.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by winerdiner29er
    Thanks Iheart, so 3/4" of sag should be a good starting point? The problem I'm running into is I'm running 65PSI in both the main chamber and the bottoming chamber. I'm having a heck of a time getting the sag right, and I can't let anymore air out per Foes's recomendations. I weigh 180 with out gear so I would think that I wouldnt have to run the shock in it's lowest reccomended pressure to get the sag where it should be. If I put any more air in the shock there is no way I could get the full travel of the shock. It's confusing me to no end right now.
    You can run the main air chamber as light as you want - it's the platform air chamber that you need to keep above 60 psi. Have you tried adjusting the bottom out control to full soft? You can run this 4 full turns out. Do go any further than that, though.
    Stupid, but sometimes witty. Occasionally brilliant. Slow and fat though.

    Mike Vandeman Sucks Dong

  30. #30
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    Impressions of the XCT-5

    OK I know it's been a while but I didn't get a chance to ride it as much as I wanted to during the summer. But I've been out on it lately and today rode @ 20 miles. So I just got back home from the ride and I have an hour to kill before the Cowboys take the field so figured I'd share my thoughts on the XCT-5.

    Alright, first things first, craftsmanship. Pictures in magazines and on the net really don't do this bike justice. When I pulled it out of the box and laid eyes on it first time I was like...Wow this thing is freakn' burly! The welds are perfection and the paint job is very high quality. Decals are nice looking and seem to be good quality. And the Foes head badge and seat tube badge "Handcrafted USA" are the perfect finishing touches. The cable routing tabs are positioned well and Foes even provided plastic snap-on U-shaped retainers for the rear brake line. Just a little extra that I thought was pretty cool. I was a little disappointed that I didn't receive an Curnutt shock owners manual but not a big deal...the information is on the Foes website.

    The ride:

    The thing that surprises me the most and that I love about this bike is the acceleration...you put foot to pedal and it leaves a trail of dust. It just seems to lunge ahead on every pedal stroke. I love to haul @$$ and this bike flat out moves like nothing else that I have ridden. Something else that I didn't expect is that it's a very good climber. No...it's not on par with my Specialized Epic but I have cleared every climb on the Foes that I have on the Epic...albeit a little slower but pretty darn good considering it's 6lbs heavier. I think it all boils down to the shock and the single pivot point design because if I'm in the saddle and I really hammer on the pedals there is no noticeable bobbing in the rear shock and the rear wheel stays planted to the ground. And the bob when standing is not bad at all, definitely less than in my fork.

    Steering is very responsive and nimble overall as well, no problems in tight trees and on technical sections. We have a ton of rocks on the trails here in TX and rock gardens are not my forte but I have little to no problems on this bike navigating through tough rocky sections. I think the 5" vs 4" makes a lot of difference but the balance of the bike I think has a lot to do with it as well.

    OK here's where the bike really gives me wood...downhill. This thing absolutely kicks #$%ing @$$ downhill. I used to pick my lines, now I just make them! It seems like the harder I push it the better it performs. The Curnutt shock is buttery smooth and soaks up the hits.

    A lot has been said on this forum about the fact that the Curnutt has poor small bump compliance and is harsh. I don't find this to be the case at all. I don't know if I just got lucky with my shock or if it's because I have the Ti spring, whatever the case may be I think the shock response is good in every situation. Let me put it this way...one hour on my Epic and the backside is sore for a couple of days...2.5 hrs on the Foes and little to no soreness the following day.

    Bottomline:

    This bike does everything extremely well...it really really shines when it comes to acceleration and downhill. All around it's just a blast to ride. The only knock I have is that it's a bit pricey, but it really delivers so I'm over that now. This is the last bike I'll buy and if I ever need to replace it I will be coming back to Foes.

    OK I have to go watch the catch the Cowboy game!

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgill32
    ...This bike does everything extremely well...
    I'd have to agree with your eval 100%, found the exact same things when I started riding my XCT-5 a while back. Welcome to the wonderful world of Foes/Curnutt!


  32. #32
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    Curnutt Air...curiosity got the best of me

    So out of the blue I recently contacted Foes to see if I could pick up a new Curnutt Air for my ride. I figured they wouldn't be available considering their move to main stream rear shocks on all their frame offerings but thought doesn't hurt to ask. Really glad I did...I picked one up brand new for an awesome price.

    Curnutt Air vs Coil-imag0117.jpg

    Daniel Burt responded immediately to my e-mail and was super helpful through the entire process...HUGE THANKS!!!

    Now I get to do a true comparison of the Curnutt air and coil myself and I have a spare shock just in case.

    I'm bedding in the shock first then will work on dialing it in before I do any comparisons.

    I've been very really tempted by the F275 but I decided to upgrade the XCT5 and stick with it for the next 2-3 years. I figure by then the industry will have more 27.5"/ 605b component offerings to choose from and Foes will likely have more frame options as well. I have new components trickling in for the XCT5 as I spec them and find them at a bargains.

    More to come...

  33. #33
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    Nice. I quite fancy a curnutt air too, so your comparison is eagerly anticipated.

  34. #34
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    I have the Curnutt air shock, love it. I see people saying it is old and outdated, but it does the same job as a fox or rockshox. When I had my rebuilt they set it up for my weight and riding style. 90% of the work is already done.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by danmtchl View Post
    I have the Curnutt air shock, love it. I see people saying it is old and outdated, but it does the same job as a fox or rockshox. When I had my rebuilt they set it up for my weight and riding style. 90% of the work is already done.
    Yeah the masses are in love with Fox and the other mainstream high leverage ratio shocks. Far as I'm concerned the Foes suspension design along with the Curnutt is pure brilliance. Does it have some drawbacks...sure, a few...but the pros far exceed the cons which are very minor such as square edge compliance issues at times and slight brake jack. Of course, there's plenty of complaints from others about poor small bump compliance but I don't notice any issues in that dept. I'd like to test out the F275 or Shaver to see how the new suspension design works and compares to the Curnutt.

    I noticed you're running 2X10 on your XCT. I've been contemplating this as well. What's your set-up and how do you like it?

    @kanerdog1x1 - Have to be patient on a comparison. Been raining here and trails are closed when wet. Also I decided to pick up the Marzocchi 44 RC3 Ti. It's a beauty, got it installed last night and really looking forward to some trail time!

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgill32 View Post
    @kanerdog1x1 - Have to be patient on a comparison. Been raining here and trails are closed when wet.
    Really!?! If the trails closed here when wet the bike would never see the light(gloom) of day. I'm just jealous.

  37. #37
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    Curnutt Air vs Coil-002.jpgI love the 2x10 setup, much better than a triple. There is little to no spinning, just power down and go. Once you get some time in you will never go back to a triple. If you have lots of hills go with the 38/24 up front and 11-36 in the rear. The low gear saves you just in case.

    My set up is

    XCT 5 with Curnutt Air shock
    Fox Talas Fork
    Pacenti TL28 rims
    XT Hubs (DT Swiss 240s on order)
    Formula ORO K24 Brakes 8" front and 7" rear
    Thomson Stem and Post
    Truvativ Riser bar
    X9 Shifters and derailleurs
    Fizik Tundra saddle
    King Headset
    Candy Pedals
    Sram 1091 chain
    Sram Grips

  38. #38
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    Nice looking ride...you must be pretty tall looking at the stem.

    Appreciate your feedback on the 2X10 set up. My 3x9 doesn't need replacing really so I might think about switching to a 2X9 set up instead to save some money and see how that works out.

    I have the Formula K24's as well...6"R/ 7"F...great brakes!

  39. #39
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    Not really tall (5'10) just have really long torso and need a 24 inch TT and a 120mm stem to fit a large correctly. The K24's work far better than my RX's on my Trek.

  40. #40
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    XCT5 - Faster & More Furious

    Finally have all the new pieces in place and a couple loops around my local trail. I'm blown away at the handling and performance of this bike now. As you'll notice in the pictures below, the Curnutt Air is not on the bike. Not sure what happened but after only a handful of rides the shock will not hold air. I don't even have it broke in yet so a bit bummed that it's got to go back to Foes for service already. Hence, I'll reserve comments on the Curnutt Air for later.

    The primary objective of my component update project was to increase the bike's downhill capability and overall ability to negotiate knarly trail. The secondary objective was to shave some weight but not at the expense of durability.

    To start, I decided to reduce the stem length (previously 90mm) and replace the overkill, freeride rated Spank Spike handlebar. For the handlebar I selected a Renthal Fatbar Lite. I initially thought a Thompson 70mm stem would be ideal but I opted for the Renthal Duo 50mm stem. The unique horizontal split clamping design won me over. The bar/stem combo is amazing - light & stiff with a nice muted gold anodized finish, Renthal makes some top shelf components. The shorter stem has really increased my control in all areas of riding, very responsive to my input.

    Curnutt Air vs Coil-dsc00721.jpg

    Next, I decided to overhaul the 3x9 drivetrain. Tired of fussing with a front derailleur and dropped chains I decided to bypass a double ring (2x9) and go with a single ring (1x9) set-up. I kept the FSA V-drive arms, removed the 3 FSA rings and added a Renthal 32T ring and a Hope 34-32T bash guard. Of course, the front derailleur & shifter cable were 86'ed but I kept the gripshift for the same feel as the right hand. I also replaced the SRAM X7 rear derailleur with a SRAM X0. Lastly, I switched to a gold KMC X9SL-TI chain. I love this set-up...plenty of gears + no dropped chains + less weight = awesome.

    Curnutt Air vs Coil-dsc00731.jpg

    Next, the fork. I replaced the 140mm Fox Vanilla RCL steel spring with a 150mm Marzocchi 44RC3 Ti spring. I was super excited to get this bad boy on my bike and it exceeded my expectations. By far the best fork that I have ever ridden, buttery smooth & plush and it's not even bedded in yet. I have had to adjust my body position a little more riding uphill to compensate for the increased stack but nothing too drastic. Front end still stays pretty glued to the trail. Downhill it bombs.

    Curnutt Air vs Coil-dsc00728.jpg

    Lastly and probably the biggest change, the wheels and tires. I choose the Easton Haven Carbon wheelset and WTB Bronson 2.3 TCS tubless tires. First time on carbon wheels and a tubless set-up. All I can say...I will never ever go tubes again. I put off going tubless thinking install would be a major hassle but quite the opposite, I should have done this sooner. I used to run 45-50psi to prevent pinch flats, on tubless now running 30-35psi. The lower tire pressure & less rotational mass facilitates better grip, faster acceleration and forward momentum which translates into a major performance improvement.

    Curnutt Air vs Coil-dsc00743.jpg

    Using an angle measurement app on my cell I took several headtube and seattube measurements.
    Head angle is ~68.5 degrees.
    Seattube angle is ~73.5 degrees.

    Curnutt Air vs Coil-dsc00751.jpg

    The bottom bracket height is 13.6 inches which is 0.4 inches higher than Foes published 13.2 inches. This has made a noticeable difference in ground clearance and reduced pedal strikes through rock gardens.

    Curnutt Air vs Coil-dsc00748.jpg

    The weight of the bike has dropped 3lbs from ~32lbs to just over 29lbs...29.15lbs to be exact. Most of the weight loss is attributed to the wheels and tires coming off an aluminum rim and tube tire combo. One interesting discovery was the weight difference between the Curnutt Air & Ti coil. I figured the Air would be at least a half pound lighter than my Ti coil but it was less than a quarter pound lighter.

    Curnutt Air vs Coil-dsc00740.jpg

    I'm extremely pleased overall with the improved performance these changes have made. This bike has always ripped, but now it's at a whole new level.

  41. #41
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    The bike looks good, thinking about doing a 1x myself.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by danmtchl View Post
    The bike looks good, thinking about doing a 1x myself.
    Hey, thanks man!

    1x...do it up man. Less is better. You'll be asking yourself "Why da heck did I need all those gears?" I would've gone 1x10 but for me the cost to transition over for one extra gear was stupid. Depending on your fitness & trail difficultly you might opt for a smaller or larger chain ring. 32T seems to be the sweet spot for me. But with better conditioning I could see 33T or 34T being doable.

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