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  1. #1
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    Strength Training over 50

    The one of the best ways of fighting the effects of aging is fitness - strength training being an important component.


    Studies have shown that moderate body mass is strongly correlated to longevity as well as other benefits (improved bone health, lean muscle mass etc. )

    Recent study I found:
    Strength training helps older adults live longer | Penn State University



    Share your personal experiences or articles related to strength training and lifting. Has it helped with your riding?


    The Fountain Of Youth flows with iron.
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  2. #2
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    Every year when the time changes I switch gears and start lifting.Usualy try to get 4 days week lifting and swim one day and use weekends to ride or do cardio on trainer or ellipitical.64 and still feel pretty good.Usualy this time of year can do 55 pushups in a minite and 15 wide grip pull ups.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Share your personal experiences or articles related to strength training and lifting. Has it helped with your riding?
    Yes. 2 to 3 times a week I lift (Mondays/Wednesdays/Fridays) - usually 30-45 minutes each session (Friday is all core work). Squats/Deadlifts/Push Press/Bench Press/Box Blasts/Curls/Knee Extensions/Lunges/Planks/Power Clean/Rows/Crunches/Dumbell Arm Snatch/Glute Bridge/Stretches - all divided up throughout the 3 sessions per week.

  4. #4
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    I do Crossfit 3 times a week. Most of my riding is on trails with a fat bike. Besides improving my leg strength, the improved upper body strength has really improved my bike control.
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    I'm not as dedicated as some, but getting to the gym once or twice a week really helps. I've had a number of injuries, and lifting has helped with recovery. Bike James .com has lots of good advice that's mountain bike specific. Single leg deadlifts, kettlebell swings and goblet squats are 3 exercises that seem very effective for me.

  6. #6
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    Absolutely. I lift regularly, and even though I'm no body builder, I do find that having extra strength makes me more durable when I hit the dirt, which happens on occasion.
    And to be honest, I need a little muscle on my rather thin body.

    I tore up my shoulder while lifting a week back and now require rotator cuff repair. The doc was surprised at how much strength and mobility I still had considering the severity of the damage. I attribute that to regular lifting. I also expect, perhaps unreasonably, that it will help speed up my recovery.
    Craig, Durango CO
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  7. #7
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    After 2 rotator cuff surguries i have quit doing stuff that hurt,Military presses,incline bench,stuff that is above sholder height

  8. #8
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    I got a new job at a local meat packing plant. Lot's of heavy lifting there already.

  9. #9
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    LOL, no gym after lifting sides of beef all day! Slacker

  10. #10
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    The men in my family generally are in the ground before they hit 70.

    The exception was my uncle. He played football semi-professionally until his late 20s (but was actually a dentist). He gave up smoking at 40, restarted swimming in his 50s, gym in his 60s, had a scandalous affair with a much younger woman when he retired, and walked miles most days, not as exercise, but rather than use his car. I gave him a bicycle when he was about 85 but he gave that up after a couple of years because he reckoned he was too dangerous for other road users.

    He swore by a daily dose of cod liver oil for his joints. He wasn't averse to a dram or two, and danced until 4am when we had his 90th celebration ceilidh.

    He was nimble and sharp as a tack until his final few weeks, and we buried him at 97.

    I can still remember the scorn his brothers poured on him about giving up the smoking, and his regular exercise.

    I reckon he had it all worked out.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankyone View Post
    LOL, no gym after lifting sides of beef all day! Slacker
    I build houses and can relate, tough to motivate after a day of framing. I feel so much better if I do though.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by speedyd View Post
    15 wide grip pull ups.

    That makes you a badass at any age.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  13. #13
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    For the longest time I thought strength training in the gym was a waste of time. You know, just get the miles in....that's where it counts. Ahh but my wife is angym rat, and she finally got me into the gym a few years back, and she set me up with a trainer. One off-season of gym time and I saw results,..... better times, better climbs, and looking better to my wife. A double win. Since then I have continued in the gym....all year, but more structured in the off season, which is about 4 months here in Idaho. No trainer any more, but I will use bodybuilding.com , which has some great instruction videos. Check them out.

  14. #14
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    goodstuff!

    I registered for the crossfit open. First workout starts tomorrow. 17.1 workout consists of:

    dumbbell snatches 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 reps
    burpee box jump-overs 15 reps after each snatch set


    There is a 20 minute cap... planning to do the snatches at the prescribed weight and hope I get through it!

    Strength training has helped my overall fitness , recover from injury and it's helped make me a stronger rider
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  15. #15
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    Riding is only one of my passions. I also paddle and backpack. Weights definitely help with those.

    I primarily do body weight exercises since my goals are muscle endurance. I do my bodyweight routine first, then supplement with free weights. Today I did core -- 450 situps and back exercises in sets of different variations, then followed up with dumbbells. Tomorrow is pull up day, then pushups and chest. So each muscle group is worked 2x /week. I am 62, so I am not going to make the ladies swoon with my shirt off no matter how much iron I push. I do have a goal of the 1000 pushup challenge (1k pushups in one calendar day, any combo of reps and sets). Working up to it, currently my body says 'no mas!' at around 700.

    the weather has been pretty wet for the last 2 months, not much riding. So the treadmill is getting a lot of use.
    So many trails... so little time...

  16. #16
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    Splitting firewood with a maul.

    Sent from my SM-P900 using Tapatalk

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by andytiedye View Post
    Splitting firewood with a maul.

    Sent from my SM-P900 using Tapatalk
    That's a tough chore!


    I did some trail maintenance (snipping branches and moving deadfall etc) on weekend and I shoveled the driveway by hand twice this winter. I can't say I enjoyed either task but at least sections of the trail were rideable and the driveway didn't turn to ice... it's all good.
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  18. #18
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    For interest only.

    This is the physical fitness standards for wildland firefighters from the Forest Service, BLM, National Park Service, et al.

    Light : Duties mainly involve office-type work with occasional field activity characterized by light physical exertion requiring basic good health.
    1 mile hike, flat terrain in 16 minutes.

    Moderate: Duties involve field work requiring complete control of all physical faculties and may include considerable walking over irregular ground, standing for long periods of time, lifting 25 to 50 pounds, climbing, bending, stooping, squatting, twisting, and reaching. Occasional demands may be required for moderately strenuous activities in emergencies over long periods of time. Individuals usually set their own work pace.
    2 mile hike, 25 lb pack, in 30 minutes.

    Aduous: Duties involve field work requiring physical performance calling for above-average endurance and superior conditioning. These duties may include an occasional demand for extraordinarily strenuous activities in emergencies under adverse environmental conditions and over extended periods of time (general front line firefighter).
    3 mile hike, 45 lb pack in 45 minutes.

    Additional for Category 1 crews, i.e. Hotshots, Helitack:
    In addition to arduous above:
    1.5 mile run in 10:35 or less
    25 pushups in 60 seconds or less
    40 situps in 60 seconds or less
    Chinups based on body weight
    >170 lbs = 4 chinups
    136-169 = 5
    110-134 = 6
    <110 = 7
    Testing is consecutive with 5 minute rest inbetween.

    Smokejumpers:
    In addition to Category 1 above:
    7 pullups regardless of weight
    Packout test: 110 lb pack, level terrain 3 miles in 90 minutes

    No adjustments for age or gender for any of the standards. Must pass test annually.

    I was not a SJ. I was hotshots and helitack, but I did pass the SJ test. The packout test was the hardest for me. As I grew older the knees became my limiting factor. I passed every year until I retired at age 50, but it was a lot harder in my 40s than my 20s.
    So many trails... so little time...

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    I spent so many purposeful years in the gym as an athlete through H.S., College, and a while after that for years I hated being in there. I thoroughly believe in the work and it's benefits but I compensated for years with riding, hiking, xc skiing, etc. Getting older (and years of sedentary work) wreaks havoc on the body. Now in my FIRST YEAR OF RETIREMENT, I forced myself back to the gym. I walk/hike 50 minutes to the gym, force myself through 20-25 minutes of (mostly machine) work and then hike home.
    The benefits (5 months now) have been noticeable.

    There are some that love it. I don't. I get through it by never resting, I go from a 'set of push' to a 'set of pull' sometimes repeating exercises but always alternating upper and lower body pairs so that by 25 minutes, I'm done. The hike home is outstanding - sometimes at -20C!

    Can't wait for the riding season, the weights will probably reduce down to 1x/week or less but it is refreshing to have the energy and overall fitness back.

    Sixty this year and getting stronger!

  20. #20
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    2x/week for now and will cut back to once per week as the riding volume and intensity increases.

    Check out 'Fast After Fifty' by Friel.

    Loss of muscle mass and decreased aerobic capacity at our age....
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

  21. #21
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    Did the Crossfit Open workout Friday evening. It was tough. I hadn't planned on it and had done a 1 hr spin class in the AM.
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpa102 View Post
    Did the Crossfit Open workout Friday evening. It was tough. I hadn't planned on it and had done a 1 hr spin class in the AM.
    Way to go!

    I'm in the Crossfit Open competition too! I was fighting a stupid cold but plowed through and finished strong under the 20 minute cap.
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  24. #24
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    cyclelicious:
    thanks for the great post - and stating a truism about strength training.
    I do various kettlebell, dumbbell and strength training type circuits, including HIIT, stabilization, balance challenges thrown in. I go for 3 workouts per week, plus the riding. In winter, I try and so a different workout every day, plus I walk a lot. On off days I do some intensive stretching, although I need to push myself to do that more regularly. I don't know if it's helped my riding or not but it can't hurt and it's good for us! It's probably helped my riding by giving me a strong core, and upper end power and flexibility.

    about 3.5 years ago I also started watching my diet and weight much more carefully, and dropped, from an overweight 180-185lbs (can't believe I was that heavy), and am maintaining pretty good at between 148-155lbs. I'm 5' 8" so that's about right I think.

    Also, I WAS paying/going to gym before, then I started using James Wilson's stuff (mtbstrength trainingcoach.com), and am using his stuff and am also using the "Ryanraw" kettebell program.
    I feel like I'm getting a more effective workout at home , in an hour or 1.5 hours time, then I was driving time to gym and spending 2-3 hours at gym doing "traditional" exercises... vs. the effective, functional workouts I'm now doing, and changing it up as to do a lot of different exercises.
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  25. #25
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    I did the crossfit open 17.4 Rx this evening. it was a repeat of last years 16.4 (55 deadlifts, 55 wallball shots, 55 calorie row and 55 handstand pushups) Last year I did it scaled (total score 195) and this year I did it prescribed (total score 176). I gave it my all!

    I don't want to be a slave to numbers but I made huge progress from last year
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  26. #26
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    That's great. I did the scaled version. I had to take it easy on the deadlifts as I tweaked my back Thursday doing cleans then did a 24 mile fat bike ride in snow that was like mashed potatoes that night. Scored a 183. Couldn't have done the handstand push-ups
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  27. #27
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    ^That is awesome jpa102! Fortunately my back and arms are fine today
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  28. #28
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    I have a Bowflex Revolution and exercise on it fairly regularly. I can leg press the entire rack sixty times, rest a few seconds and squeeze out ten more. I also do bench presses and all sorts of other lifts and presses on it. I'm sure it does help but I was getting crazy pain in my hips from becoming quad dominant from all the cycling I was doing.
    I started trying to mix up other kinds of exercise like side steps with resistance bands and some Yoga stretches. It was helping a little.
    This past Christmas, my twelve year old asked for a twelve week membership at a new local kickboxing gym. I got it for him. He LOVED it. I watched a class and signed up myself.
    The first week was a killer. Now, we've both completed the twelve weeks and have stepped up to the next level. My hips no longer hurt, my feet no longer hurt, my back no longer hurts.
    I really just needed to cross train and this seems to be it for me.
    I'm losing weight, I look better and I'm faster on my bike. My son even took on Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Thursday evenings and Saturdays. He loves that as well. My wife is mad because she wants him to play basketball or baseball but his heart wasn't in those sports. He truly enjoys this.
    It's also awesome that we go to kickboxing together. We have fun together.
    Come to think of it, my son didn't do a lot of riding this winter while it was very cold. One week when it was warmer, he went out with me and rode like he had not been off the bike. He was right on my rear wheel the whole time.
    I'd say it's a good cross train.
    I like turtles

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpa102 View Post
    I do Crossfit 3 times a week. Most of my riding is on trails with a fat bike. Besides improving my leg strength, the improved upper body strength has really improved my bike control.
    Ditto that.
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    @cyclelicious - great post! I didn't think I "needed" strength training for my upper body since I was a cyclist. I was so wrong. I do weight training now and feel so much better on and off the bike. My core strength has made riding more enjoyable. I think I'm in the best shape of my life (both strength wise and cardio). Healthy nutrition has also played a big part in the way I feel.

  31. #31
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    I have a life outside of cycling. I paddle, hike, backpack, fishing, and other forms of outdoor pursuits. Maintaining a level of strength helps all of them.

    I also get a rebate of my health insurance premiums if I maintain health and fitness markers.

  32. #32
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    In summary: High-intensity interval training improved age-related decline in muscle mitochondria.
    This study supports our training and what we try achieve. Keep exercising!! Eat well and up the intensity!

    The Best Exercise for Aging Muscles

    The toll that aging takes on a body extends all the way down to the cellular level. But the damage accrued by cells in older muscles is especially severe, because they do not regenerate easily and they become weaker as their mitochondria, which produce energy, diminish in vigor and number.

    A study published this month in Cell Metabolism, however, suggests that certain sorts of workouts may undo some of what the years can do to our mitochondria.

    Exercise is good for people, as everyone knows. But scientists have surprisingly little understanding of its cellular impacts and how those might vary by activity and the age of the exerciser.

    So researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., recently conducted an experiment on the cells of 72 healthy but sedentary men and women who were 30 or younger or older than 64. After baseline measures were established for their aerobic fitness, their blood-sugar levels and the gene activity and mitochondrial health in their muscle cells, the volunteers were randomly assigned to a particular exercise regimen.

    Some of them did vigorous weight training several times a week; some did brief interval training three times a week on stationary bicycles (pedaling hard for four minutes, resting for three and then repeating that sequence three more times); some rode stationary bikes at a moderate pace for 30 minutes a few times a week and lifted weights lightly on other days. A fourth group, the control, did not exercise.

    After 12 weeks, the lab tests were repeated. In general, everyone experienced improvements in fitness and an ability to regulate blood sugar.

    There were some unsurprising differences: The gains in muscle mass and strength were greater for those who exercised only with weights, while interval training had the strongest influence on endurance.

    But more unexpected results were found in the biopsied muscle cells. Among the younger subjects who went through interval training, the activity levels had changed in 274 genes, compared with 170 genes for those who exercised more moderately and 74 for the weight lifters. Among the older cohort, almost 400 genes were working differently now, compared with 33 for the weight lifters and only 19 for the moderate exercisers.

    Many of these affected genes, especially in the cells of the interval trainers, are believed to influence the ability of mitochondria to produce energy for muscle cells; the subjects who did the interval workouts showed increases in the number and health of their mitochondria — an impact that was particularly pronounced among the older cyclists.

    It seems as if the decline in the cellular health of muscles associated with aging was “corrected” with exercise, especially if it was intense, says Dr. Sreekumaran Nair, a professor of medicine and an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic and the study’s senior author. In fact, older people’s cells responded in some ways more robustly to intense exercise than the cells of the young did — suggesting, he says, that it is never too late to benefit from exercise.
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  33. #33
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    Yup, Cyclelicious. We can't fight aging, but sticking with a solid training plan that includes high intensity work, strength training, a good diet, adequate recovery time and sleep are all key factors.

    The slow and steady workouts won't do much towards maximizing fitness, but this is what we tend to do as we age for fear of harming ourselves in some way.

    I know I mentioned it before, but Friel's 'Fast Over Fifty' is an excellent read for anyone looking to maximize fitness at our age.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

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    Crossfit 4xs a week, been at it for 3 years. Didn't do the open as I did it last year and that was enough. If I went to a regular gym I wouldn't get the workout I do at Crossfit. I am very careful with the weights amounts that I do, I did heavy weights when I was younger and do not feel the need to do them now. Scale is my friend.

  35. #35
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    For anyone interested in the aging process and research in the field:

    http://eriba.umcg.nl/

    Estimates are in the next 20 years there will be more people over 60 in the world than under 19. I intend to do my part by outliving my pension and become a burden to the taxpayers.
    So many trails... so little time...

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by e-wa View Post
    Crossfit 4xs a week, been at it for 3 years. Didn't do the open as I did it last year and that was enough. If I went to a regular gym I wouldn't get the workout I do at Crossfit. I am very careful with the weights amounts that I do, I did heavy weights when I was younger and do not feel the need to do them now. Scale is my friend.
    Scale. Indeed. I started Crossfit a month ago, never really lifted at all before. Scale, scale, scale.
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  37. #37
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    ^ Way to go all you crossfitters I did the crossfit open this year again ( my 3rd ) I have been steadily improving. This year was the first time I did 3/5 workouts Rx. My doubleunders sucked in the final event but I plowed through. The hard work paid off and I have decent overall results for my age division, region, affiliate etc.
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    Awesome! I haven't even thought about attempting a double under. Up until a few months ago I had never jumped rope. Just getting through 35 single unders was an effort.
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    ^ Thank you ! I had to do 2-4 singles to every double under... I think in the end I did about 1000 skips! Something I will keep working at (in addition to pull ups, pistols, etc) I had never done these movements before crossfit but I have made small gains



    Here is an interesting article that looks at strenth training and endurance.... it all depends on the goals

    How To Train For Strength & Endurance At The Same Time | Poliquin Article
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  40. #40
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    Doing farmer carries has benefits

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    I was first introduced to kettlebells 3 years ago in crossfit. We incorporate kettlebells into our training program a few days per week. Yesterday we did farmer carries in our class and Monday we did swings in our interval training session. KBs are versatile

    I found this article which describes the virtues of using kettlebells to enhance running but it easily applies to mtb as well.


    Let’s clear this up right now, strength training and running go together, it’s not one or the other. Most runners avoid strength training for fear of being bulky, or because they’re afraid it will decrease their run time. Runners need to understand that strength training can improve their run time and increase their work capacity. If that’s not convincing, then consider that runners are prone to injuries such as patellofemoral pain syndrome, plantar fasciitis, stress fractures, as well as hip, low back, and shoulder pain. Quite an extensive list. We can prevent these issues by introducing kettlebells into our training.

    Why Kettlebells?

    The kettlebell is the Swiss Army knife of fitness—you can train for strength, conditioning, mobility, power, etc. with just one tool. A tool that serves multiple purposes is great if you have limited time or not enough space for bigger equipment like barbells or racks of dumbbells. Kettlebells give you the ability to exert a maximum muscular contraction instantly in an explosive power burst. Using exercises like the kettlebell swing or kettlebell snatch will train you to build a lot of power. The amount of tension, speed, and force needed to complete a swing or a snatch is very high, and the benefits carry over into the production of power. Kettlebell exercises have been known to help athletes improve their performance by increasing their power output—this also allows runners to excel in their races.

    When training with kettlebells, we are often barefoot or wear minimalistic shoes. At my facility Restored Strength, we highly recommend that our members do not wear shoes. We are in shoes all of the time, and wearing shoes while training puts the foot in a plantar flexed position because the heal is elevated. Because of compression from the shoes they can also restrict the range of motion in the ankle. The freedom of being barefoot allows the ankle to have a greater range of motion. Training barefoot will also raise your kinesthetic awareness by allowing the proprioceptors in the foot to have greater exposure. The benefits can transfer over to your running, when you are not constricted by your shoes.

    Why Strength Training Can Prevent Injuries

    The RKC is well known for being The School of Strength. We promote the importance of strength in a purposeful manner. While strength training has many applications, let’s discuss why it is essential to be a strong runner. When you begin to introduce strength training into your program, you get physically stronger and there’s a physiological aspect as well. Strength training promotes greater bone density which reduces the likelihood of hair line fractures. You will also strengthen the ligaments, tendons, and muscles—which hold and secure joints in proper alignments. If you are not strength training, the certain areas in the body will become weak. Being weak is dangerous since weak muscles and bones are fragile and susceptible to injuries.

    Strength training can increase your muscular work capacity, which can improve your running technique. You’re less likely to fatigue, and when your muscles are stronger, you can maintain proper mechanics for longer periods of time. Stronger muscles will decrease the likelihood of fatigue during a race, and strength training helps increase the type 2 (fast twitch) muscle fibers. Focusing on the big five major muscle groups—knees, hamstrings, glutes, trunk, back—used when running will make strength training less daunting.

    What to Train

    Glutes: The glutes are the key muscle group in the mechanics of running. The gluteus medius will be the main focus, as this muscle is the rotator cuff of the lower body. When you move, it’s the first muscle to quickly contract, and it stabilizes your body when you are on one leg. Running is a unilateral activity—a single leg is in motion—which is why it’s crucial to strengthen and stabilize the gluteus medius in unilateral exercises.

    Hamstrings: These bad boys strengthen your lower back. When they contract, they flex the knees, the repetitive motion in running. Your heel should reach your glutes during the back-swing motion, this allows for greater power output when running. With stronger hamstrings, you will be able to produce greater force output when running. Having strong hamstrings will complement your glutes—the two together will prevent low back pain and allow your running to be less strenuous on the posterior chain.

    Quadriceps: Runners usually have overdeveloped quadriceps, but it is still worthwhile to train them. The quadriceps are responsible for two major movements in running, knee extension and hip flexion. These actions cause the leg to swing forward when running. The insertion of the quadriceps is located on the tibial tuberosity, the boney projection below the knee. Having stronger quadriceps will assist in maintaining knee position. One muscle of the quadriceps, the vastus medialis, helps stabilize the patella and the knee joints when we run.

    Trunk: The trunk is a fancy word for abdominals. The trunk maintains your posture and keeps you upright. When we run, we want to maintain a tall posture and make sure that we are as tall as we can get, allowing us to have a greater range of motion through the hips. We won’t be able to maintain that tall position while running with a weak trunk. Strengthening the abdominals will allow for greater stability. Stronger abdominals also reduce the wobbly feeling when running. If you are wobbling from side to side when you run, then you have an energy leak slowing you down.

    Back: The back is the last key player for strong running. Like the trunk, the back has the same role of keeping your body upright. Having a stronger back will help retract the shoulder blades, which prevents the shoulders from rolling forward. Good posture carries over to proper mechanics when running. If you find it difficult to maintain your posture, then you will need to improve your back strength. A strong back can prevent energy leaks through the upper body, and make sure you’re carrying your arms in an optimal way while running. A strong spine complemented by strong mid and lower backs will stabilize the spine and the pelvis.

    How to Train


    When we train, we want to train movements rather than muscles. The big movements are lower body pushing and pulling, upper body pushing and pulling (vertical and horizontal), trunk work, carries, and unilateral upper and lower body movements. I make mobility training a staple in my programming as well. It is a mixture of movement and strength—you need to be mobile to be strong and you need to be strong to be mobile.

    In my opinion, the push/pull upper body/lower body approach is the most optimal way to train. It conserves time and targets every area. Using this type of training will also reduce the amount of training sessions each week. I recommend two to four days each week, depending on your training.


    Training day example:
    Strength Training over 50-kettlebellrunningtrainingchart.jpg


    Conclusion

    Strength training can undoubtedly improve your run time and prevent injuries if done correctly. There are many different modalities of training, and kettlebells have been the most useful for me. To help your athletic performance, make sure to include kettlebell training in your program. If you are unfamiliar with kettlebell training, find yourself a certified RKC instructor to take your training further.


    Sauce how-to-run-injury-free-using-kettlebells/
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  42. #42
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    I've always lifted and now at 52 that habit has proven beneficial. My issue is that I've always lifted heavy and I have a difficult time shifting to more of a fitness/maintenance type of workout. Where I once lifted individual muscle groups heavy on a 3 on 1 off cycle I do far less intense workouts now, working the entire upper body with fewer exercises, but still all I can do for 10-15 reps instead of my former 6-10. I combine these intense upper body days with 2-3 days of mountain biking and walking several miles 6 days a week.
    I'm a classic endomorph at 5'6" 195 and enjoy good food and beer enough that as I age and my metabolism slows even with all my exercise I cannot lose weight. The keys to my getting leaner; a fitness rather than strength workout and a leaner diet with less beer. Strength is great and if you're going to carry extra weight it should be muscle rather than fat, but being heavy can stress your systems even if it's muscle in excess.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by dave54 View Post
    For anyone interested in the aging process and research in the field:

    http://eriba.umcg.nl/

    Estimates are in the next 20 years there will be more people over 60 in the world than under 19. I intend to do my part by outliving my pension and become a burden to the taxpayers.
    The data doesn't support that - at least for the US Population. Up to 30% of the Baby Boomer population will not even reach the age of 65 (12-15 M have died thus far over the years due to accidents, health/illness, tragedy, military action, etc... . However, those 12-15 Million US Boomers lost to death in prior years have been replaced in numbers by immigrants in the same age categories). Yet, that hasn't really thrown the US Population Pyramid out of whack. If anything, it is shooting Harry Dent's theory all to heck (in a very good way that bodes well for our country's demographics and population pyramid).

    Here is the source...

    Population United States of America : 2016

    Current largest demographic population in the US is the echo-boomers (Millennials) that surpassed the Baby Boomer generation in terms of numbers. The largest chunk of that demographic generation (currently ages 20-29) has not even yet begun having children. If the Millennial population ends up having the same number of children as the Boomers, then in 20 years the population pyramid will not support the thesis of more over age 60 than under age 19 - at least here in the US.

    I seriously doubt our generation will live longer than what we are currently seeing or have seen in the death ages of our parents. Time will tell if indeed we meet the statistical number that 30% of Boomers will die before age 65. We just went through the loss of all four parents (81, 88, 91, 92). I doubt my wife and I will top that just because we are of the Boomer population and all the optimism of hope, prescription drugs, living forever blah, blah, blah hoopla that is being spread as myth. ;-)

    Enjoy each day as you have it. Stay in the best physical shape possible so that the quality of the days you do have left are the best they can be. Not because you think that means you are going to live "longer"...

  44. #44
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    Have weight trained since high school. Competed in natural bodybuilding in my early 20's. Was a certified personal trainer. Turning 54 in June and probably in better shape than many younger than me. Did P90X for years and have been doing Body Beast for the last year or so. Ski every weekend with my boys in the winter (21 times so far this winter) and do single track with my youngest in the spring and summer. I am sure I couldn't keep up this pace if I hadn't trained all of these years.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown View Post
    The data doesn't support that - at least for the US Population. ...
    That is why I said the world.

    Physical activity is only one of the four identified factors for longevity outside of genetics. The others being diet, social network, and sense of purpose.
    So many trails... so little time...

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Evil View Post
    Have weight trained since high school. Competed in natural bodybuilding in my early 20's. Was a certified personal trainer. Turning 54 in June and probably in better shape than many younger than me. Did P90X for years and have been doing Body Beast for the last year or so. Ski every weekend with my boys in the winter (21 times so far this winter) and do single track with my youngest in the spring and summer. I am sure I couldn't keep up this pace if I hadn't trained all of these years.
    Agreed. I used to take time off from workouts after the racing season ended, but can no longer afford to do that. 6 days a week of primarily riding/training with some gym days in there.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

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    I was a pretty consistent gym rat (also used to box - training, not competing) up until I had a hernia repair about 5 years ago. Biking was great for my recovery and has been my main source of fitness since, largely singlespeed mountain biking, and also lots of hiking. With the exception of very light dumbbell and medicine ball stuff at home, I kinda let upper body strength training slide after the hernia (I also have another, sometime almost imperceptible hernia that the doc thinks is too inconsequential at this point to do surgery on).
    Anyhow, I'm back at the gym now at 56 and getting some upper body strength back. I'm super lean and my muscle definition and strength are coming back quick, but, putting on any mass has always been difficult for me--my metabolism is crazy fast.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by dave54 View Post
    That is why I said the world.

    Physical activity is only one of the four identified factors for longevity outside of genetics. The others being diet, social network, and sense of purpose.
    Except, the rest of the world will not factor into the taxpayer burden plans in your quote...

    Quote Originally Posted by dave54 View Post
    I intend to do my part by outliving my pension and become a burden to the taxpayers.
    If you have a pension, you will not outlive it as they are designed to pay you for your entire life.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown View Post
    Except, the rest of the world will not factor into the taxpayer burden plans in your quote...



    If you have a pension, you will not outlive it as they are designed to pay you for your entire life.
    The future costs of an aging population is a ticking time bomb politicians on both sides are ignoring. Not only in the U.S. but elsewhere also. Kicking the can down the road is a worldwide political practice.

    My pension comment was meant as levity. It also plays into the future costs sentence above. One of mine is actuarially sound and fully funded, not so for many. I have set up my other investments to be about as recession proof as possible, barring a total global economic collapse.
    So many trails... so little time...

  50. #50
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    I have a home gym. Not looking for new muscles at my age (57). I am looking for a simple series of exercises with minimal resets on the equipment.
    Currently do Bench leg extensions and curls.

  51. #51
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    I don't do much at 64, but I do it consistently. I deadlift a couple of times per week. Wide grip pullups between each set of deadlifts as my "rest" between sets and to stretch out my back. Heavy DB snatches (easier on the back than BB snatches after all of the deadlifting I do, but still hard). One arm DB rows (also easier on the back than BB after all of the deadlifts, but the offset load is also still hard). And I run 6 - 8 hill repeats on weekends. Run up like a mountain lion is chasing, walk back down, repeat.

    Those are the things that I can still do with my worn out shoulders and somewhat limited shoulder mobility and I can do that week in and week out without fear of injury.

    That is the main thing, knowing exactly what I can do without hurting myself. Crossfit or MMA or rock climbing would put me into a permanent contractual agreement with my doctor, hospital, and rehab staff, so I stick to the basics.

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    A couple weeks ago, on my 60th, I achieved a long term goal of benching 2 x 100 pound dumbells (I was so stoked for it, I actually did 3 legit reps). I weigh ~180 and have been lifting 3-4 days per week for about 8 years. It's the most I've bench pressed ever. The dumbell press is the only move that I had set a max goal for, though. I'm mostly in it for general fitness lean muscle maintenance and I don't mess with spotters, etc.

    Had a few injury setbacks along the way. Gotta REALLY pay attention to correct technique because those joints (all of 'em) will let you know when you don't. I've put the stops on going for more weight on the dumbell press (which I'm pretty sure I could do now) because the aches are starting to outweigh the satisfaction of the progress - especially in my back from getting the weight off the floor and up to my thighs on the bench. I' ve even changed gyms to one with 75 pound dumbells max to avoid the temptation. I'm sure I'll get more long term health benefits just moving the weight that I am comfortable with, without being concerned with max goals.
    Last edited by BikesFloat; 04-16-2017 at 04:49 PM.

  53. #53
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    Some of us do crossfit and have experienced positive results.. .

    How to talk to someone who does CrossFit, if you really must - CNN.com
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  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikesFloat View Post
    A couple weeks ago, on my 60th, I achieved a long term goal of benching 2 x 100 pound dumbells (I was so stoked for it, I actually did 3 legit reps). I weigh ~180 and have been lifting 3-4 days per week for about 8 years. It's the most I've bench pressed ever. The dumbell press is the only move that I had set a max goal for, though. I'm mostly in it for general fitness lean muscle maintenance and I don't mess with spotters, etc.

    Had a few injury setbacks along the way. Gotta REALLY pay attention to correct technique because those joints (all of 'em) will let you know when you don't. I've put the stops on going for more weight on the dumbell press (which I'm pretty sure I could do now) because the aches are starting to outweigh the satisfaction of the progress - especially in my back from getting the weight off the floor and up to my thighs on the bench. I' ve even changed gyms to one with 75 pound dumbells max to avoid the temptation. I'm sure I'll get more long term health benefits just moving the weight that I am comfortable with, without being concerned with max goals.
    The hardest part is getting those damn things from the rack to the bench and back to the rack.

  55. #55
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    It's never too late

    Strength Training over 50-18222380_1347221062020232_1736022938004967308_n.png
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  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    It's never too late

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I have EXACTLY this conversation with my wife probably weekly.
    I like turtles

  57. #57
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    https://www.facebook.com/bestfitness...type=3&theater

    I got a trophy for completing the first program. I'm actually into my fifth month of kickboxing. Still loving it. I feel fantastic and it's made me faster on my bike.
    I like turtles

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by NYrr496 View Post
    https://www.facebook.com/bestfitness...type=3&theater

    I got a trophy for completing the first program. I'm actually into my fifth month of kickboxing. Still loving it. I feel fantastic and it's made me faster on my bike.
    That's so awesome Congrats! Kickboxing kicks ass! Keep up the great work.
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  59. #59
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    Thanks, Cyclelicious.

    Best part of all... I fixed all the punching bags and they give me 50% off on my membership.
    I like turtles

  60. #60
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    Since this is MTBR, this is more likely:

  61. #61
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    Interesting article about weight loss vs fat loss


    8 Reasons You?re Not Losing Fat in a Calorie Deficit
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  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Interesting article about weight loss vs fat loss


    8 Reasons You?re Not Losing Fat in a Calorie Deficit
    Good stuff.
    I like turtles

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Interesting article about weight loss vs fat loss


    8 Reasons You?re Not Losing Fat in a Calorie Deficit
    great read, thanks!

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Interesting article about weight loss vs fat loss


    8 Reasons You?re Not Losing Fat in a Calorie Deficit
    Other than the silly graphics good article, Very truthful because I ate a very healthy breakfast and lunch today and rode my bike I should see results.

  65. #65
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    High-Intensity Workouts Could Slow Down Your Aging By Almost A Decade | IFLScience

    In summary: This new study has concluded that exercise, of all things, allows our cells to age far slower than they otherwise would. Specifically, adults with high-intensity exercise levels, such as 30-40 minutes jogging [or riding hard] five days per week, appears to keep your cells nine years younger than your birthday cake would suggest.
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  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    High-Intensity Workouts Could Slow Down Your Aging By Almost A Decade | IFLScience

    In summary: This new study has concluded that exercise, of all things, allows our cells to age far slower than they otherwise would. Specifically, adults with high-intensity exercise levels, such as 30-40 minutes jogging [or riding hard] five days per week, appears to keep your cells nine years younger than your birthday cake would suggest.
    Funny you happened to post this right now. This past weekend, my brother dropped my son off at my house and came in to say hi. My wife doesn't see him a lot so she was surprised that he looks so much older than I do. (Her words).
    I said what do you want? He doesn't ride his bike regularly or work out or anything.
    He's three years younger than I am. I never thought about it but he is showing his age more than I am.
    I like turtles

  67. #67
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    ^ The fountain of youth ...
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  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    ^ The fountain of youth ...
    Hey...where'd you get that quote from? I want to borrow that!

    Quote Originally Posted by BikesFloat View Post
    I don't mess with spotters, etc.

    Had a few injury setbacks along the way. Gotta REALLY pay attention to correct technique because those joints (all of 'em) will let you know when you don't. I've put the stops on going for more weight on the dumbell press (which I'm pretty sure I could do now) because the aches are starting to outweigh the satisfaction of the progress - especially in my back from getting the weight off the floor and up to my thighs on the bench
    Congrats on the 100# d'bell presses! Most people will never know how that feels, regardless of age.
    Might give that no messing with spotters part some thought, though.
    If you can't either walk to the bench or deadlift them from the floor and sit down with the dumbbells on your thighs to start, having someone(ideally two someones, one on each side) put them on you when you're in position sure beats leaning over and picking them up. That really is begging for injury, plus you might get another rep or two after not going through all that!
    I've got up to 60lb dumbbells at home, and the only way I'd ever use 100+ again would be for rows or shrugs. Only time I do a d'bell bench press is incline, supersetted with flyes. 'Course that may be because all I've got are 60s...funny how that works

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    High-Intensity Workouts Could Slow Down Your Aging By Almost A Decade | IFLScience

    In summary: This new study has concluded that exercise, of all things, allows our cells to age far slower than they otherwise would. Specifically, adults with high-intensity exercise levels, such as 30-40 minutes jogging [or riding hard] five days per week, appears to keep your cells nine years younger than your birthday cake would suggest.

    Research out the Netherlands suggests cell mitochondria may be the agent that maintains telomeres. And high intensity exercise stimulates mitochondria production.
    So many trails... so little time...

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    High-Intensity Workouts Could Slow Down Your Aging By Almost A Decade | IFLScience

    In summary: This new study has concluded that exercise, of all things, allows our cells to age far slower than they otherwise would. Specifically, adults with high-intensity exercise levels, such as 30-40 minutes jogging [or riding hard] five days per week, appears to keep your cells nine years younger than your birthday cake would suggest.
    Hey cyclelicious, Do you ride and do crossfit or weights in the same day? I was thinking about that since I have a crazy work schedule.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fuzzle View Post
    Hey cyclelicious, Do you ride and do crossfit or weights in the same day? I was thinking about that since I have a crazy work schedule.
    Focusing on strength training and riding at the same time is very tough... plus having a job! I don't typically ride on a strength training day but if I do... it's an easy ride... basically spinning out the legs and doing an easy trail ride. Currently my rides have been pretty tame, because I haven't had time to do long rides so I've been doing shorter intense rides.

    Also think about what your goal is ... gain strength, or gain mtb endurance?

    If you have a crazy schedule you might want to try a more periodized approach. For a period time focus heavily on gaining strength and maybe throw a day or two of light/easy riding or running. Or you can focus on riding (depending on how much time you have, long rides or short intense intervals.... can be done with running too ) , and maybe do a day or two of light lifting just for maintenance. That's going to be your best way to progress at both.

    In addition: Work around your rest days so that you can maximize your recovery time. If you have a tight schedule and you are trying to cram in as much as possible, you still need to ensure rest and proper food intake.
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  72. #72
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    We did circuit training in kickboxing last night. Usually, it's ten stations, four for different punches, four for different kicks bookended by two cardio stations. We started with forty second intervals and then switched to thirty seconds and he added two more cardios in between all the punching and kicking.
    I could barely stand at the end of the class.

    Then, this morning on my bike commute, the guy who usually tries to race me got smoked. Made it all worth it.
    I like turtles

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Focusing on strength training and riding at the same time is very tough... plus having a job! I don't typically ride on a strength training day but if I do... it's an easy ride... basically spinning out the legs and doing an easy trail ride. Currently my rides have been pretty tame, because I haven't had time to do long rides so I've been doing shorter intense rides.

    Also think about what your goal is ... gain strength, or gain mtb endurance?

    If you have a crazy schedule you might want to try a more periodized approach. For a period time focus heavily on gaining strength and maybe throw a day or two of light/easy riding or running. Or you can focus on riding (depending on how much time you have, long rides or short intense intervals.... can be done with running too ) , and maybe do a day or two of light lifting just for maintenance. That's going to be your best way to progress at both.

    In addition: Work around your rest days so that you can maximize your recovery time. If you have a tight schedule and you are trying to cram in as much as possible, you still need to ensure rest and proper food intake.
    I was going to try to do both. So now maybe not. I know that at my age I have to focus on strength training. It's the whole change of life that throws a wrench into everything. It's a bummer. Thanks for the advice!

  74. #74
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    I climbed a hill this morning I haven't been able to ride up for three years.
    This was totally made possible by the circuit training we've been doing at the gym.
    I can't believe how happy I am. I honestly thought I wouldn't make that climb ever again.
    I like turtles

  75. #75
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    F*ck Cancer

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  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Ewww

    Sent from my F3213 using Tapatalk

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    It's never too late...
    Lovely.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  78. #78
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    Rode Keystone Mountain bike park last week other than some bruises on the inside of my thighs/knees I was able to keep up with the younger crowd. The best part is the following day both of my younger buddies were complaining about being sore and I am pretty solid. I have been lifting and squatting for about 3 months.

  79. #79
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    I think older people should stick to exorcizes specifically tailored to their needs. They are designed to fit in with the older lifestyle.

    For instance, throwing the toilet lever, lifting the pension and, for advanced exponents, running in the shorts.

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    I mountain bike in the summer and telemark ski in the winter. That takes care of my lower body, but to round out those muscle groups light hiking is enough. I also whitewater kayak in the spring and summer so my core muscles and rotator cuffs are taken care of. That leaves my arms, and pushups and pull ups (at this point, maybe I should say pull up!) pretty much handle those groups. The one thing that really needs work is in the area of flexibility and range of motion! That is going to be my post retirement goal.

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    (at this point, maybe I should say pull up!) pretty much handle those groups. The one thing that really needs work is in the area of flexibility and range of motion! That is going to be my post retirement goal.
    Just a suggestion which you may already do, get a chair or something out in front of you and push with a leg. It allows you to do more pull ups with the assist, and is better than doing just one or two alone without.
    Just be ready with that other leg if you lose contact with the bar.
    Craig, Durango CO
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  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by cbrossman View Post
    Just a suggestion which you may already do, get a chair or something out in front of you and push with a leg. It allows you to do more pull ups with the assist, and is better than doing just one or two alone without.
    Just be ready with that other leg if you lose contact with the bar.
    Good idea. I was doing pulldowns at the gym a while back. I should just start going again....it's free now that I'm on Medicare!

  83. #83
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    Age 51 here. Started doing Fit36 classes (HIIT; similar to Orange Theory) and it's really helped me on the bike and I just feel better overall, too.

  84. #84
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    My new favorite subforum on reddit.. doglifting


    Strength Training over 50-dsvydjfwaagx-xm.jpg



    https://twitter.com/drewtoothpaste/s...751557/photo/1
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  85. #85
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    I trained hard in 2017 and I reached a few PR's. I have to think about some goals for 2018. (some of the pr's I accomplished... I really didn't plan on and I surprised myself!)

    Some of the biggies for me: I am now able to do 3 consecutive pull ups with kipping (still working on a strict pull up), finally able to kick up into a handstand (I am halfway to doing a handstand pushup), and I accomplished the 15' rope climb. For strength I pr'd my back squat at 190lb, front squat at 130lbs, shoulder press at 85lbs, clean at 90lbs and snatch at 70lbs. My deadlift remains at 225 lb.

    My running has helped with cardio and endurance workouts. 2017 has been a good year and wish all the (over 50) mtbr lifters many gainz in the new year.

    Strength Training over 50-26112011_2038443406400100_6806183445511325171_n.jpg


    Strength Training over 50-26114011_2038446063066501_8668195485911326223_n.jpg
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  86. #86
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    That's badass. Happy New Year.
    I like turtles

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    I trained hard in 2017 and I reached a few PR's. I have to think about some goals for 2018. (some of the pr's I accomplished... I really didn't plan on and I surprised myself!)

    Some of the biggies for me: I am now able to do 3 consecutive pull ups with kipping (still working on a strict pull up), finally able to kick up into a handstand (I am halfway to doing a handstand pushup), and I accomplished the 15' rope climb. For strength I pr'd my back squat at 190lb, front squat at 130lbs, shoulder press at 85lbs, clean at 90lbs and snatch at 70lbs. My deadlift remains at 225 lb.

    My running has helped with cardio and endurance workouts. 2017 has been a good year and wish all the (over 50) mtbr lifters many gainz in the new year.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Inspiring note.

    I have dropped 30lbs from hiking and watching what I eat. Time to add weights and more strength training.

  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Wow! That is one heck of a before and after!

  89. #89
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    Working on our split jerks last evening. The split jerk is a very powerful and fast move. (Last movement for the complete clean and jerk. The lifter can use either a push jerk or split jerk as the technique for getting the weight overhead ). Muscles Used: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, core, shoulders, back and triceps.

    Strength Training over 50-26229892_2041288502782257_7214392206951775530_n.jpg


    Strength Training over 50-26219478_2041288899448884_4552562535276415511_n.jpg
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  90. #90
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    About 5 years ago I was doing HIIT mostly on a treadmill (20-25min x 3 days a week only as suggest for recovery) and had some significant weight loss and I found my HGH really peaking in many different facets of my body, etc. It's an intense 20-25min but you just can't beat the results. I had a ruptured disc in my back 3 years ago and not only stopped my HIIT training but also couldn't touch any weights. Unfortunately, I kept eating as though I was still doing HIIT and strength training and packed on 25-30 lbs.

    I just couldn't get motivated to get back into the gym after recovering from my ruptured disc and I had a buddy who was a mountain biker that kept needling me to go with him. I FINALLY succumbed to him nagging me and went. I was HOOKED. I've been riding now over 15 months and logged in 1505 miles in 2017 and untold hours on my mountain bike.

    I see some guys while out riding not that younger than me or even my age or older who seem to climb and ride some technical areas and climbs with ease. I've gotten a LOT better and accomplished hurdles or obstacles I once was afraid to, or kept getting defeated on. But still, these guys just jam on their bikes with the greatest of ease. So back in November I started doing some push-ups, planks, medicine ball exercises, dumb-bell bench presses, dumb-bell flys, hammer curls, etc in hopes of improving my mountain bike fitness. Much to my chagrin I recently started having shoulder pains (again like I did in 2013) and went today and got a cortizone shot in both shoulders.

    My question is this for those who are doing strength training to ride better (not you freaks doing cross-fit! lol) is this: are their some key exercises (waist up) that really keys in on the body parts that will help you be stronger in the saddle, build your core for more stamina and endurance, and reduce fatigue)

    FYI, I am 54yrs old so Im no spring chicken and realize there is no magic pill here. I just want some advice to that actually keys in on those areas above. Since this is winter and the rains and freezing weather seem to be relentless thus far.
    OMB
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  91. #91
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    Excellent!!^^^
    I like turtles

  92. #92
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    Too much volume in too short a time. Start weightlifting slow and increase slower. Past 50 the body does not respond to resistance exercise the same way it did in your twenties. Takes longer to get improvement and you lose it faster on a break. (Fact of life. No matter how hard you train you will never reclaim your glory years). I primarily do bodyweight now, very little free weights. I need an extra day of recovery after a workout, so I only do a given routine 2x per week.

    Don't neglect your rotator cuff. Add some shoulder specific exercises to your routine. You found out what happens when you push your shoulder too hard too fast. Low weight few reps. You really do not want hypertrophy in the rotators. Just endurance and flexibility.

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    I hate working out in the gym. Three times a week I do pushups, situps/ab work, pull-ups, light curls, and a couple of very light shoulder exercises. About 10-15 minutes per session. I try to maintain flexibility (especially shoulder flexibility), have a little bit of upper body muscle tone, and keep the ability to lift my body weight repeatedly (pushups to lift off of the floor, pull-ups to lift overhead). The equipment needed for this is a couple of light dumbells and a pull-up bar. I don't ever want to think that I can't do my workout because I don't have a particular piece of specialized equipment. Cycle commuting 65-80 miles a week with about 9000 ft of climbing, much of it out of the saddle, gives me some interval training and some upper body work. Run or hike 1x/week, hills but typically low intensity. Age 53. Fitness goal: ride a BMX bike competently on my 65th birthday, have functioning shoulders and hands well into my 70s, and be able to walk/hike fairly easily well into my 70s.

    I remember seeing a presentation in which the presenter (a physician) asked the audience what was more likely to limit your independence as you age, impaired shoulder mobility or impaired leg strength. The answer was shoulder mobility--because you need it to be able to wipe your own butt. Thus my emphasis on shoulder mobility.

  94. #94
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    Both of you give sage advice and I have heeded it all. You're right about going too much too fast. I am a former Marine and I only know one gear I'm afraid. lol. And that mentality was present when I began this workout. Even today after having these cortisone shots I want to go to a gym and do some HIIT sprinting on a treadmill (since I gave mine away months ago like a dummy) but, decided that I better give these shots their sufficient time to do their job. All morning I have been trying to tell myself that there is no way I could counter these shots by mere sprinting! But I believe any kind of strenuous exercise such as swinging my arms rapidly might not be a good idea. So I decided to keep my butt planted.

    I'm much like you Paramount in your thinking about long term and my health. Back in the late summer I had a guy come up behind me on my bike and I kindly moved to the right so he could pass. As he passed I noticed what appeared to be about an 80yr old man pass me like I was standing STILL on my bike! And proceeded to blast past me with the greatest of ease. I want to be like him! lol. At least then hopefully I'll be the hunk at the Senior Living residence I'm sentenced to!
    OMB
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    2016 Specialized Fuse Comp
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    Wife and I just got back from Planet Fitness. It’s $20 a month and something we really enjoy doing together 2-3 times a week. Mid 40’s. Don’t know if I’m getting stronger but I feel better. I’ll let you know when I get the bike out in the spring if it’s made a difference.

  96. #96
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    Excellent documentary ... "How to Stay Young"

    Science holds the key to how to stay fit and healthy

    Scientific breakthroughs are redefining how we think about aging and more than ever, there is hope that we can overcome our greatest enemy – the process of biological decline. How to Stay Young investigates the latest research around the world that could put the brakes on the aging process.
    The sit to rise test:




    Watch the doc.
    How to Stay Young
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  97. #97
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    That's good stuff, Cycleicious. I need a knee. I've been working on getting up unassisted in kickboxing just cause it looks cooler. I had no idea it actually gave a look into the future.
    I like turtles

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldManBiker View Post

    I'm much like you Paramount in your thinking about long term and my health. Back in the late summer I had a guy come up behind me on my bike and I kindly moved to the right so he could pass. As he passed I noticed what appeared to be about an 80yr old man pass me like I was standing STILL on my bike! And proceeded to blast past me with the greatest of ease. I want to be like him! lol. At least then hopefully I'll be the hunk at the Senior Living residence I'm sentenced to!
    i have a similar story, I'm mid 50s. Last spring I was riding my usual trails to pump up a hill to find a couple of 30 somethings on pricy bikes with full pricy kit. They were stopped and breathing heavily, I paused to ask f they were OK and they said they were. I breazed on by comfortably. I felt good about myself. An hour later I quicky was overtaken by a person who breezed by me and looked to be early mid 70s. I didn't feel bad after I got back to the car, he was still there and looked like an American Ninja Worrier. LOL

  99. #99
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    A happy, healthy marriage: meet the couple who have been cycling together for 64 years



    If you’re looking for a novel way to spend Valentine’s Day as a couple, or an exciting idea for first date then donning the Lycra, clipping in to the pedals and cycling into the sunset could be the best way to a long and loving partnership.

    New research shows that going for a ride may be the best way to set the wheels in motion on a new relationship. A survey carried out by the dating app Bumble and AirBnb reveals that 77 percent of women would be impressed by a prospective partner suggesting a new experience as a date option – and cycling together featured among the favourites.

    Riding for romance has certainly worked for Jack White, 86, and wife Pamela, 84. The couple, who regularly rides around their home town of Ludlow, in Shropshire are celebrating their 64th wedding anniversary this year. They insist that it’s a shared love of cycling that’s kept their marriage strong.

    Jack and Pamela first met at a South Buckinghamshire Cycling Club meet in 1953. “She was 19, I was 22 and we were both keen cyclists,” says Jack, 86. “Pam’s sister introduced us and I invited Pam to join us on some club rides.” For Jack and Pam cycling together was a first date that blossomed into a true romance. They married a year later and still ride out with their local Cycling UK club having moved to Ludlow from Buckinghamshire when their children left home.

    “I’m a very competitive cyclist,” says Jack, who still rides an average of 1,000 miles on his indoor turbo trainer over the winter. “But Pam prefers the touring and the social side of cycling. I’ve taken part in over 800 time-trials and have ridden over 250,000 miles since I took up the sport. Pam has marshalled time trials in the past and also made the cakes and teas. We both get different things out of being on a bike.”

    The passion for cycling runs in the family too. “As soon as they were old enough we got our two daughters into cycling,” says Pamela. “When Jack bought a triplet, him on the front, the youngest, Carolyn, in the middle and Susan on the back. We toured and hostelled with it on the Isle of Wight. That week we became notorious on the island with that triplet, with motorists tooting their horns and waving.”

    Both Pamela and Jack insist that compromise is a key to enjoyment when riding as a couple. “Jack likes to head off up the hills whereas I will cycle around the towns and villages. In France, Jack cycled up Mont Ventoux while I rode around the villages and stopped at the café for a coffee.”

    Mont Ventoux, a 1912-metre high mountain, is the hardest of all the Tour de France climbs. “I did it when I was 73, then completed it again when I was 83,” says Jack. “It hurt a lot more the second time around. Even though it was in the summer the temperature at the summit was freezing and the visibility really poor, but I managed to climb it ok.”

    Over the years the couple have cycled through Spain, Cyprus, France and the former Yugoslavia. ”France is the best place to ride,” says Pamela. “The drivers are more considerate and the facilities are geared up for cyclists. Over here football is the big thing, but in France cycling is definitely a national sport. Yugoslavia was interesting, Dubrovnic was beautiful but we went there over 30 years ago and it was a very different place. I remember the choice in the shops for picnic food was limited.”

    “It’s been incredibly beneficial to our health too,” says Pamela. “All of the cycling we’ve done in the past has definitely paid off now. I’ve heard it said that cyclists appear 10 years younger than someone of a similar age.”

    Pamela’s thoughts are echoed by a new survey of 300 UK doctors by Patient.Info which highlights cycling as among the best exercises people can do to remain fit and health. “Cycling can help you maintain a healthy weight and improve your cholesterol profile, as well as helping to reduce your risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis and even cancer,” explains Dr Sarah Jarvis, “Not to mention the positive effects on mental health."

    Jack and Pamela insist that cycling has been a crucial factor in a loving relationship – but it didn’t look like that would be the case at first.

    “Jack fell off his bike on the eve of our wedding,” says Pamela. “He cut his head open and damaged his shoulder. It meant that the next day we had to remove his bandages before the wedding photos were taken and that I had to carry our suitcase during our honeymoon. When the vicar asked if I take this man for better or worse I thought ‘it can only get better!’ Almost 64 years later we’re still married and we’re still cycling.”

    sauce:A happy, healthy marriage: meet the couple who have been cycling together for 64 years
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    I guess I am jumping the gun and inserting myself into this conversation, but I am not quite 50, though I will be in 2 months... Anyways I do CrossFit 4-5 times a week and have for 4 years, I also run and/or bike 2-3 times per week, I am in the best shape of my life at 49. I find that a stronger core and legs from weight training has helped me in all of my passions in life- skiing, biking, hiking etc. All the good stuff!

    I am more of an endurance athlete than a strength athlete, I prefer running, rowing and Assault Air Bike components of WODs and generally scale the weights, because frankly some RX weights are too damn heavy for me for example #155 C+J! I bought a fatbike in late fall 2016 for winter riding because frankly running sucks in the winter in Maine, I have had so much fun that I am now in the market for a full-suspension mountain bike.

    Reading through the personal stories on the thread is so cool and inspiring, I am hoping that my body continues to hold up so that I can keep on keeping on! Good luck on your journeys!

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