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  1. #101
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    ^ Thank you for sharing your experiences Utilitrack! We are all unique but share so many similarities.


    I'm learning that it's never too late to improve or try new things.


    On Valentine's Day I did my first toes to bars (using the rings) My core strength is getting stronger... I'm still goofy though


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  2. #102
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    I signed up for the Crossfit open. Representing Canada East 55-59 age category. (subcategories are my affiliate gym and regional nurses) It's my 4th year taking part. My goal is to do most of the workouts prescribed and finish strong.

    Anyone else signed up?
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  3. #103
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    Kicked off the CF open. It was a 20 minute AMRAP. (ie as many rounds as possible)

    8 Toes to bar (which I just learned to do ^^)
    10 dumb bell clean and jerks
    12 cal row

    I did it prescribed and that was a goal I wanted to accomplish.

    No problem with stiffness for my workout the next day and we were still able to do a fun ride in the evening

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  4. #104
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    18.1 was a fun one, 17.1 not so much... Good luck on the rest of the Open!

  5. #105
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    18.2 completed. Dumb bell squats, burpees over the bar (110 reps total) and then heaviest clean . I did the 12 minute workout Rx. It was a tough one!

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  6. #106
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    18.2- 10:55, 18.2A- #165 (about 50# below my 1 RM)- only had time for 2 clean attempts, probably started too low initially but I wanted to make sure that I had something to log. At 6'4" burpees are not my friend...

  7. #107
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    Cycling keeps your immune system young, study finds

    Cycling can hold back the effects of ageing and rejuvenate the immune system, a study has found.

    Scientists carried out tests on 125 amateur cyclists aged 55 to 79 and compared them with healthy adults from a wide age group who did not exercise regularly.

    The findings, outlined in two papers in the journal Aging Cell, showed that the cyclists preserved muscle mass and strength with age while maintaining stable levels of body fat and cholesterol. In men, testosterone levels remained high.

    More surprisingly, the anti-ageing effects of cycling appeared to extend to the immune system.

    An organ called the thymus, which makes immune cells called T-cells, normally starts to shrink from the age of 20. But the thymuses of older cyclists were found to be generating as many T-cells as those of young people.

    Prof Janet Lord, director of the Institute of Inflammation and Ageing at the University of Birmingham, said: “Hippocrates in 400BC said that exercise is man’s best medicine, but his message has been lost over time and we are an increasingly sedentary society.

    “However, importantly, our findings debunk the assumption that ageing automatically makes us more frail. Our research means we now have strong evidence that encouraging people to commit to regular exercise throughout their lives is a viable solution to the problem that we are living longer but not healthier.”

    Male cyclists taking part in the study had to be able to cycle 100km in under 6.5 hours, while women had to cover 60km in 5.5 hours.

    The non-exercising group consisted of 75 healthy people aged 57 to 80 and 55 young adults aged 20 to 36.

    Many other studies have also shown the remarkable health benefits of cycling. A study published in the BMJ last April found that regular cycling cut the risk of death from all causes by more than 40%, and cut the risk of cancer and heart disease by 45%.

    Experts also believe cycling boosts riders’ mental health, with multiple studies finding that those who commute by bicycle are happier and less prone to depression than those who use any other form of transport.

    A recent report from cycling and walking charity Sustrans also found that cycling does not just benefit an individual’s health but that of society as a whole, estimating that if Britain were to reach government targets for walking and cycling, the country would save about £9.3bn and reduce deaths from air pollution by more than 13,000 over the next decade.

    Prof Stephen Harridge, director of the Centre of Human & Aerospace Physiological Sciences at King’s College London, said: “The findings emphasise the fact that the cyclists do not exercise because they are healthy, but that they are healthy because they have been exercising for such a large proportion of their lives.

    “Their bodies have been allowed to age optimally, free from the problems usually caused by inactivity. Remove the activity and their health would likely deteriorate.”

    sauce https://www.theguardian.com/lifeands...ng-study-finds
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  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Cycling keeps your immune system young, study finds...
    I've often wondered about that. Good to see it confirmed.

    What I have noticed about getting older is how many friends and associates fell by the wayside into unhealthy lifestyles and then think the attendant health issues that result are unavoidable.

    If that message could be absorbed by the young, it would be of immeasurable benefit to their lives.

    Simple rule don't damage your body unnecessarily, don't poison it, and treat it like a dog you love - take it for walks and runs and bike rides.
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  9. #109
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    "What I have noticed about getting older is how many friends and associates fell by the wayside into unhealthy lifestyles and then think the attendant health issues that result are unavoidable.

    If that message could be absorbed by the young, it would be of immeasurable benefit to their lives."

    Truer words are rarely spoken!

  10. #110
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    I did the 18.3 scaled. Although for our age group, we didn't have to do muscle ups, the prescribed version was challenging. I'm still working on doubleunders. I can only do them every 2 or 3 skips and to complete 100 after each set of lifts would have eaten up too much time. My pull ups are slow and the crossfit open is no time to practice. So I did the scaled version for the 55-59 age group. I think there are just 4 people (all much younger categories) at my gym that did the workout prescribed


    Overall I did well. I did my skips (singles) and lifts unbroken. I finished with time to spare. Good cardio paid off.

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  11. #111
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    "What I have noticed about getting older is how many friends and associates fell by the wayside into unhealthy lifestyles and then think the attendant health issues that result are unavoidable."

    That!

    With me, it's siblings with questionable habits thinking they are unlucky and I am just lucky to have better health.

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by ddoh View Post
    "What I have noticed about getting older is how many friends and associates fell by the wayside into unhealthy lifestyles and then think the attendant health issues that result are unavoidable."

    That!

    With me, it's siblings with questionable habits thinking they are unlucky and I am just lucky to have better health.
    Exactly. I deal with patients all of the time that think the same. They think that it is normal to have pain, decreased function and illness as we age. I am not saying there isn't a normal aging process. There is. Sadly, most people experience abnormal aging and think that is normal for two main reasons. First, doctors tell them they are getting older and should expect it. Second, they know so many others just like them. Just because a lot of people have the same experience doesn't make it normal. It just means it is COMMON. Big difference.

  13. #113
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    We all knew this

    Forget Pills And Anti-Wrinkle Creams, The Real Trick To Slow Down Aging Is Regular Exercise

    Hippocrates once said that exercise is man’s best medicine and he was not wrong. If you need another excuse to hit up the gym, know that a lifetime of regular exercise significantly reduces the effects of aging on the immune system, muscle mass, and cholesterol.

    A paper published in the journal Aging Cell measured highly active people aged between 55 and 79 on a range of fitness criteria. While it was previously assumed that aging causes the body to become frail regardless of how many gym hours you put in, the results suggest this is not the case. In fact, the active seniors were able to maintain the body fat, cholesterol levels, and immune system of a young person. In men, regular exercise was also found to keep testosterone levels high and possibly help sidestep the male menopause.

    "We hope these findings prevent the danger that, as a society, we accept that old age and disease are normal bedfellows and that the third age of man is something to be endured and not enjoyed," Niharika Arora Duggal, from the University of Birmingham, said in a statement.

    All the active seniors involved in the study were amateur cyclists: the 84 men who took part had to be able to cycle 100 kilometers (62 miles) in 6.5 hours or less and the 41 women 60 kilometers (37 miles) in under 5.5 hours. Their data were compared to those of 75 healthy adults aged 57-80 and 55 healthy adults aged 20-36, none of whom exercised regularly. Smokers, heavy drinkers, and people with high blood pressure and health conditions were immediately excluded from the study so as not to confuse the results.

    Most excitingly, perhaps, is the effect of exercise on immunity. It comes down to the thymus, an organ responsible for producing a type of immune cell called the T cell. Scientists expect the thymus to start shrinking and thus produce fewer T cells from the age of 20. Yet, the cyclists maintained the same T-cell count as the youngsters, suggesting regular exercise prevents the immune system from aging.

    "Their bodies have been allowed to age optimally, free from the problems usually caused by inactivity. Remove the activity and their health would likely deteriorate," explained Stephen Harridge, Director of the Centre of Human and Aerospace Physiological Sciences at King's College London.

    The team hopes this research could prove to be a solution to "the problem that we are living longer but not healthier”, a depressing reality confirmed in a report last year that revealed the expected number of healthy years is not keeping up with advances in life expectancy.

    NHS England recommends doing 150 minutes of aerobic exercise a week. Study author Norman Lazarus' advice: "Find an exercise that you enjoy in whatever environment that suits you and make a habit of physical activity. You will reap the rewards in later life by enjoying an independent and productive old age."

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    Sauce Forget Pills And Anti-Wrinkle Creams, The Real Trick To Slow Down Aging Is Regular Exercise | IFLScience
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  14. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Cycling keeps your immune system young, study finds




    sauce https://www.theguardian.com/lifeands...ng-study-finds
    Here is the original paper:

    Major features of immunesenescence, including reduced thymic output, are ameliorated by high levels of physical activity in adulthood - Duggal - 2018 - Aging Cell - Wiley Online Library

    The methodology is flawed: To do this right, you would need to take a set of 20-somethings, divide your study group into two cohorts, and assign one cohort to cycle regularly for the next 50 years, while having the control group do no particular exercise. After 50 years, you would then have to select the people left in the control cohort who are still "healthy" and use them as the actual control group for the study, to compare with the cyclists who were still able to ride. Not an easy study to do, I agree.

    The problem with the study, as reported, is that only a very select group of people are both willing and able to cycle regularly throughout their lives, and are still going at it at age 70+. is it the cycling that made the difference? Or are these people predisposed to be healthier, and this allowed them to enjoy cycling and continue it into old age?

  15. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by paramount3 View Post
    ...The problem with the study, as reported, is that only a very select group of people are both willing and able to cycle regularly throughout their lives, and are still going at it at age 70+. is it the cycling that made the difference? Or are these people predisposed to be healthier, and this allowed them to enjoy cycling and continue it into old age?
    Agree. On the other hand, I think most of us who are in that category have seen our compatriots self-select their poor health. We have also seen some of them pull themselves out of poor health by physical activity.

    I know that's an anecdotal rather than a scientific approach, but it's backed up by writings throughout human history. Get off your posterior if you want to live. There's no guarantees, but it's better than the other option.

    However all the books and advice on how to be healthy sail over the heads of most people.

    Maybe what is needed is a manual "How to die early after years of miserable ill health before you collect your pension".
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  16. #116
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    My anecdotal evidence is that it's not enough to just be active, but you have to push it as well. Max out your heart rate climbing tough hills, lift heavy weights, whatever, but exercise like you mean it.

  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by panchosdad View Post
    My anecdotal evidence is that it's not enough to just be active, but you have to push it as well. Max out your heart rate climbing tough hills, lift heavy weights, whatever, but exercise like you mean it.
    Rippetoe and many others would call it training rather than exercise. Do it with the intent to get stronger, faster ...
    Craig, Durango CO
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  18. #118
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    " My anecdotal evidence is that it's not enough to just be active, but you have to push it as well. Max out your heart rate climbing tough hills, lift heavy weights, whatever, but exercise like you mean it."

    I am a firm believer in the idea of training with intensity. I was MTBing for years, but as a social rider. When I upped the intensity, I not only lost significant weight, I was able to throw away my blood pressure and cholesterol pills. It also made a big difference in how I felt.

    OTOH: A couple of recent studies I've seen have shown that 15-30 minutes of walking (yeah WALKING) at any pace improves the health profile of older Americans.

  19. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by ddoh View Post
    " My anecdotal evidence is that it's not enough to just be active, but you have to push it as well. Max out your heart rate climbing tough hills, lift heavy weights, whatever, but exercise like you mean it."

    I am a firm believer in the idea of training with intensity. I was MTBing for years, but as a social rider. When I upped the intensity, I not only lost significant weight, I was able to throw away my blood pressure and cholesterol pills. It also made a big difference in how I felt.

    OTOH: A couple of recent studies I've seen have shown that 15-30 minutes of walking (yeah WALKING) at any pace improves the health profile of older Americans.
    As a clinical exercise physiologist with 20+ years in cardiac rehabilitation, I can tell you that both of these are true. Exercise is like anything else, the more you put into it, the more you'll get out of it. Also, keep in mind that according to Healthy People 2010 more than 60% of American adults get no leisure time physical activity whatsoever.

    This becomes even more mind boggling when you realize that bowling counts as physical activity. If you can get these incredibly sedentary folks to do pretty much anything, there's measurable health and fitness benefits to be had. Imagine what'd happen if we could bet them out on the trails for what most of us would consider an easy 60 minute ride...

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    Like most people here, I do like to push myself. But especially when it comes to riding a mountain bike, pushing yourself too hard brings risks. Overuse injuries, strains/pulls, and crashes all can end up costing you long-term fitness. And it's not that uncommon for a super-fit guy to drop dead of a heart attack running a marathon. Be fit, but listen to your body, and be in it for the long haul.

  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by paramount3 View Post
    ...Overuse injuries, strains/pulls, and crashes all can end up costing you long-term fitness. And it's not that uncommon for a super-fit guy to drop dead of a heart attack running a marathon...
    I've certainly found that it's much easier to overdo it these days and that any extended recovery time is also unfortunately decline time, so it is smarter to avoid punishing your body as opposed to stressing it.

    I work on the principle it's good to be breathless but not gasping.

    I don't want to be the old guy who drops dead on a group ride - which is something you read about every month or so over here.

    What younger riders don't realise when you're keeping pace with them is that you're more likely to be running at the redline than they are. Proportionally you're working harder.

    Almost always the person didn't feel well and headed off home. I think the lesson is if you suddenly feel unwell when exercising, don't head home, call an ambulance.
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  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by paramount3 View Post
    it's not that uncommon for a super-fit guy to drop dead of a heart attack running a marathon.
    Being fit is part of being healthy but just because you are physically fit it doesn't mean you are healthy.

  23. #123
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    18.4 Crossfit open done... one more week to go

    I was able to do the workout prescribed 21-15-9 reps (deadlifts 125lbs and push presses 65lbs) for 9 minutes. I got as far as the second set of 21-15-9 (deadlifts @165lbs) I got 15 reps in before I ran out of time. Tough work out!


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    You are just confirming that I am an ultra out of shape old fart with an out of wack ego complex into thinking that I was actually exercising quite well for my age.

  25. #125
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    Fitness is 20% gym and 80% kitchen.
    So many trails... so little time...

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    Quote Originally Posted by dave54 View Post
    Fitness is 20% gym and 80% kitchen.
    the kitchen might have the say as to the amount of fat you add your body, but the gym has the last word to how much muscle mass.

  27. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by roadkill401 View Post
    the kitchen might have the say as to the amount of fat you add your body, but the gym has the last word to how much muscle mass.

    Incorrect. With a poor diet you negate the gains a resistance exercise regimen would otherwise give you. A healthy diet is part of fitness -- the major part.
    So many trails... so little time...

  28. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by dave54 View Post
    Fitness is 20% gym and 80% kitchen.
    So if I eat good I'll have good fitness?

  29. #129
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    If all you eat is sugar and processed foods then sure, no amount of exercise will build or retain muscle mass on a person. But in the same breath, if all you are going to do is eat the most healthiest foods but not properly work out the muscles, rather just sit around on the couch and watch pumping iron on Netflix and flick through muscle mags, then your not going to gain, and likely will have a hard time to retain any muscle mass.

    I look back to my parents growing up and they were fit as a fiddle. We have next to no money and under what you would call today a pretty below average diet, but what we didn't lack was fitness. Didn't have a spare car to drive everywere so we walked. Didn't have cash for expensive landscapers, so we lugged up I don't know how many tonnes of rock from the ravine behind us and made a beautiful rock garden. Seeing photos of my dad when he was young, he was quite ripped, yet he grew up in a depression era in England with 5 other brothers and they had little if any meat, mostly potatoes and whatever green they could grow themselves.

    I think back to myself and I went down hill after a major cycling accident some 15 years ago. It was part stress, part bad eating habits from that stress and dealing with onset migraine attacks from the head injury from the accident that took me from being really fit to where I am now. And along with age against me, it's much harder to shed the lbs and regain the muscle mass that I once had. But I am sure, if I didn't push myself to work out daily and only spent my energy on eating better then I might weight less but would not be nearly as strong as I am now.

  30. #130
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    Just saying hi. Cool to see fellow hybrid Crossfit and MTBers here! May favorite ways to stay fit and have fun!

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    Quote Originally Posted by paramount3 View Post
    Like most people here, I do like to push myself. But especially when it comes to riding a mountain bike, pushing yourself too hard brings risks. Overuse injuries, strains/pulls, and crashes all can end up costing you long-term fitness. And it's not that uncommon for a super-fit guy to drop dead of a heart attack running a marathon. Be fit, but listen to your body, and be in it for the long haul.
    I can certainly relate to the crash part of pushing too hard, two collarbones can attest to that. I wonder how common it is for marathoners to die running. Certainly it happens, but I would guess that the numbers would say that it's actually is uncommon.

  32. #132
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    Here's a good article about strength training (over 40)

    You're not going downhill once you reach 40. You simply have to adjust your training to match your changing physiology.
    My take away:
    1) Value form over all. Strength is a skill. To develop that skill, you need to do it over and over with perfect form. I can't match the PRs of some of the younger girls and ladies, but I found that concentrating on technique has lessened the chance of injury and muscle strain.

    2) Use Lighter Weights On Single-Joint Exercises. Elbows, shoulders, and knees are more vulnerable to injury after about age 40 because of the inevitable wear and tear of the cartilage surrounding the joints. Single-joint movements hit them most directly because the load isn't spread across multiple joints.

    3) Take 5-10 minute to Warm up. for the over-40 lifter the consequences are even more significant. That's because masters athletes are more likely to have a long rap sheet of injuries. They're also more likely to have at least one serious mobility or flexibility hurdle to deal with, for whatever the reason.




    read the whole article
    sauce 5 Ways To Make Strength Gains Past 40
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  33. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post

    3) Take 5-10 minute to Warm up....

    5 Ways To Make Strength Gains Past 40
    I turned 40 last year and I spend 15-20mins warming up, stretching, mobilizing before hitting the weights at the gym. Not only does it prevent injury - but given my lack of bendiness - it also helps me get into the proper form and positions for my lifts.

    For riding...I notice a huge difference on trails where it starts off steep (either up or down), vs. starting on flat or open fireroad to properly warm up before hitting the steep or technical stuff.

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    Forty? Is that considered old? I’ve got socks older than you

    I used to stretch a ton, never really noticed any benefits other than I gained flexibility.

    I like to start my rides straight up, get nice and hot, then back off and spin.

    You ever seen a Cheetah stretch?

    Quote Originally Posted by smoothmoose View Post
    I turned 40 last year and I spend 15-20mins warming up, stretching, mobilizing before hitting the weights at the gym. Not only does it prevent injury - but given my lack of bendiness - it also helps me get into the proper form and positions for my lifts.

    For riding...I notice a huge difference on trails where it starts off steep (either up or down), vs. starting on flat or open fireroad to properly warm up before hitting the steep or technical stuff.

  35. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post

    You ever seen a Cheetah stretch?

    cats invented yoga

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    I brake for stinkbugs

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    Always warm up BEFORE stretching. Otherwise, it can be counter-productive.

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    Following this thread since I turned 50 this year. Was running on and off but now trying to get back on the bike and hitting the weights and stretching (which I have never done before). Thanks for the inspiration.

  38. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by smoothmoose View Post
    I turned 40 last year and I spend 15-20mins warming up, stretching, mobilizing before hitting the weights at the gym. Not only does it prevent injury - but given my lack of bendiness - it also helps me get into the proper form and positions for my lifts.
    25 or 30 years ago or more, we all grew up KNOWING that you had to stretch before exercising to prevent injury. It was an incontrovertible fact passed on by P.E. teachers the world over. Funny thing about science is that it never stands still; someone is always willing to question what we think we know. That's good. New evidence either reinforces what we know, or it doesn't.

    In this case, the new evidence (now two decades old) doesn't support our high school coach's claims. Current (read circa post 1995 or slightly earlier) thinking in sports medicine is that pre-exercise stretching has little, if anything, to do with injury prevention.

    Don't take my word for it, I just do this for a living: http://andrewvs.blogs.com/files/stre...ent-injury.pdf

    So, why do professional athletes stretch before competition then? Two comments: first, they ALWAYS warm up first. Second, it feels good.

    Oh, and for many of us, the coach that told us we had to stretch before working out was the same guy that gave us salt tablets and told us that not drinking water during exercise would toughen us up. Knowledge evolves.

    Quote Originally Posted by ddoh View Post
    Always warm up BEFORE stretching. Otherwise, it can be counter-productive.
    In the sports medicine world, we rephrase this as warm up to stretch, don't stretch to warm up.

  39. #139
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    Crossfit Open done! I did the final 18.5 workout prescribed. It was the most pull ups for me (I just started being able to do one or two!)

    I ended up placing 44th /135 Canada East (women 55-59 yr ) Not too shabby

    I'm so impressed by the fitness level of the women and men in this age group.


    Strength Training over 50-29512485_10155175219342181_2131330528816005676_n.jpg

    Strength Training over 50-29511454_10155175219552181_4796271348513350701_n.jpg

    Strength Training over 50-29511670_2081651928745914_5921499868494163895_n.jpg

    Strength Training over 50-29513202_2081643398746767_4383417025435346466_n.jpg
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  40. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fairbanks007 View Post
    25 or 30 years ago or more, we all grew up KNOWING that you had to stretch before exercising to prevent injury. It was an incontrovertible fact passed on by P.E. teachers the world over. Funny thing about science is that it never stands still; someone is always willing to question what we think we know. That's good. New evidence either reinforces what we know, or it doesn't.

    In this case, the new evidence (now two decades old) doesn't support our high school coach's claims. Current (read circa post 1995 or slightly earlier) thinking in sports medicine is that pre-exercise stretching has little, if anything, to do with injury prevention.

    Don't take my word for it, I just do this for a living: http://andrewvs.blogs.com/files/stre...ent-injury.pdf

    So, why do professional athletes stretch before competition then? Two comments: first, they ALWAYS warm up first. Second, it feels good.

    Oh, and for many of us, the coach that told us we had to stretch before working out was the same guy that gave us salt tablets and told us that not drinking water during exercise would toughen us up. Knowledge evolves.



    In the sports medicine world, we rephrase this as warm up to stretch, don't stretch to warm up.
    Correct. My original post stated warming up first. Static stretching while cold is useless. Warming up without stretching and mobilizing ain't that great either. Dynamic stretches....even better. Gets you warm and bendy at the same time.

  41. #141
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    Very impressive cyclelicious! Way to push it.

  42. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by indiomonk View Post
    Very impressive cyclelicious! Way to push it.
    Thanks so much indio!

    It is nice to feel competitive, regardless of age. Many of the younger athletes are stronger and faster but the true competition with me is seeing my own progression and doing better with each workout. Attending class regularly and working on form and technique is the pay off. Ultimately I'm a fitter rider
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  43. #143
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    this guy is amazing!

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  44. #144
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    Strengthen Your Core With These Spine-Sparing Exercises

    Take the pressure off the sit-up with new and improved ways to strengthen your core.
    As we move through life, our fitness regimens change. The dreaded mile run from gym class turned into an occasional pick-up hockey game in our 20s, which morphed into coaching peewee soccer in our 30s (walking and shouting at kids is exercise, isn’t it?). Then middle age came and continues and, well, many of us just got tired. And that’s a lame excuse. Anything we can do to limber up will only help as we grow older. But just how to begin?
    The old standby for many is the traditional sit-up, that go-to for
    abdominal muscles. But studies have shown it may not be your best fitness friend after all.

    Dr. Stuart McGill, professor emeritus of spine biomechanics at the University of Waterloo and author of Back Mechanic, who studied the sit-up’s effect on the spine, says choosing an appropriate exercise comes down to its risks and rewards.

    In his extensive study of the exercise, he determined that the average person generated more than 300 kilograms of compressive load on their flexed spine with a sit-up. That’s equal to the exposure limit for low-back compression set by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The combination of the repeated bending motion, together with the compressive load from the muscle activity, can lead to disc bulging and herniation.

    That potential for injury is greater for those performing the exercise with extreme repetition. Such was the case for the Canadian Armed Forces, who – after consulting with McGill and other experts – dropped the sit-up from their fitness testing in favour of safer and more effective exercises that better simulated real-world tasks.

    While the average Canadian doesn’t exercise with the same vigour as Canada’s military hopefuls, the sit-up can exacerbate pre-existing back pain caused by conditions like arthritis. “When you keep bending an arthritic spine, it becomes sensitized and painful,” McGill says.

    As for the rewards, people have traditionally believed the sit-up targets the abdominal wall, which appears as the coveted six-pack when it’s strengthened and layers of fat are shed from the abdomen. But it’s also a crucial part of our core musculature, which serves a far more important function.

    “Having a fitter core always makes sure you have that resilience in your spine to execute when you need it –whether it’s arresting a fall, getting out of the way of a car if you stepped off the curb, carrying your groceries or your grandchild.”

    Hinging up over the hips during a sit-up also strengthens the hip flexors, muscles that help us get our foot out in front of us when we stumble.

    Fortunately, McGill has identified a way to replicate these benefits while minimizing the risk. After putting a variety of core exercises through the same stringent analysis as the sit-up, he identified the big three: a trio of core exercises that he says are “the very best in sparing the spine, ensuring sufficient spine stability and creating sufficient athleticism.”

    “You’re not training to be a Navy Seal anymore,” McGill says of switching from the sit-up to the big three. “You’re training to be the most pain-free and able-bodied person for the longest period of time.”

    The Big Three

    Each exercise is performed in repetitions of 10-second holds with 30 seconds of rest between each set.

    Try five repetitions for your first set, three for your second and one for your final set. When you feel like you’re ready for more of a challenge, add one repetition to each set with every exercise.

    You can also increase the holding times once you start to build endurance, as long as you don’t experience back pain.

    *Those who suffer from chronic back pain or have a pre-existing back condition should have approval from their physician before performing the following exercises.

    1. The Curl-Up

    Target: Abdominal Muscles a.k.a. Rectus Abdominis and the Obliques

    While lying down face up, slide your hands under your lower back with your palms facing down to support the lumbar spine. This position maintains the natural curve of your spine during the exercise, minimizing the stress on your back.

    Keeping one leg extended, bring the other into a bent position so that your planted foot lines up with the knee of your extended leg.

    Before you begin the hold, stiffen the abdominal muscles and elevate your elbows off the floor with your hands still underneath your lower back. Keeping your torso and neck as immobile as possible, raise your head and shoulders about one centimetre off the floor and hold the position for 10 seconds.

    McGill says to imagine your head and shoulders resting on a bathroom scale and that the lift is just enough to make the scale read zero.

    To avoid neck pain, be sure to raise your shoulders, neck and head as a unit.

    2. The Side Plank

    Target: Spine-Stabilizing Muscles, including Quadratus Lumborum, the Abdominal Wall and Latissimus Dorsi

    For beginners, start by lying on your side, supporting yourself with your forearm and with knees bent about 90 degrees. Rest your upper hand on the top of the thigh or hip. Raise your hips, keeping your body straight. Hold this position for 10 seconds.

    For a more challenging version, straighten your legs, slide the top foot ahead of the bottom one and use only your forearm and feet as contact points.

    This exercise can also be moved to the wall if you’re unable to do the floor variations – try leaning sideways against a wall with the forearm perpendicular to your straight body. The farther the feet are away from the wall, the tougher the exercise. Again, hold for 10 seconds.

    Don’t forget: do the exercises on both left and right sides!

    3. The Bird Dog

    Target: The Back and Hip Extensors

    Kneel down on all fours with your hands directly under your shoulders and knees under your hips.

    Stiffen your abdominal muscles and raise the opposite arm and leg simultaneously. The hold begins when both limbs are parallel to the floor. Don’t raise the arm higher than the shoulder or the leg higher than the hips.

    To improve the benefits of the exercise, sweep the upraised hand and knee along the floor in between the holds.

    Remember to keep the spine locked. Only the shoulders and hip joints should move during the exercise.




    Bonus: The Dead Bug

    Target: Hip Flexors

    Lie on your back. Place your left hand palm down under your lower back. Bend your right knee and keep the foot on the floor. Your right arm should be on the floor over your head.

    Stiffen your abdominal muscles. Moving only about the hip and shoulder, raise your left leg and right arm up to about 45 degrees, then lower them back to the floor.

    Repeat using the five, three and one rep set pattern. After completing your 10-second holds, alternate to the opposite arm and leg.
    sauce The Annotated Body: 14 Healthy Head-to-Toe Tips - Everything Zoomer
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  45. #145
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    OK, I'm willing to try these exercises in lieu of situps. But I think riding mountain bikes puts way more stress on my back than situps do.

  46. #146
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    I just got the results of my annual bone density test and I'm pleased to report that it has improved since last year. I take a vitamin D supplement. I discussed the results with my oncologist and GP and they both determined that my positive results are primarily related to strength training. While I do take a vitamin D supplement, I regularly practice cross fit and run, in addition to mtb.

    I did some searches and found some studies related to improved bone density

    1) Progressive load is best for bone health.

    Exercise involving high impacts, even a relatively small amount, appears to be the most efficient for enhancing bone mass, except in postmenopausal women. Several types of resistance exercise have been tested also with positive results, especially when the intensity of the exercise is high and the speed of movement elevated.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9927006

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19453205

    2)
    Athletes competing in strength and power events, such as weight-lifting and jumping, have superior bone mass and structure compared with their untrained counterparts in all age groups.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16702776

    3) Benefit of high intensity impact training

    They posit that exercise should: (i) be dynamic, not static; (ii) exceed a threshold intensity; (iii) exceed a threshold strain frequency; (iv) be relatively brief but intermittent; (v) impose an unusual loading pattern on the bones; (vi) be supported by unlimited nutrient energy; and (vii) include adequate calcium and cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) availability
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16138787

    I've learned that it's never too late or impossible to gain strength and muscle mass over the age of 50. As a life long vegetarian and plant-based /vegan for the past 4 years it is possible


    Strength Training over 50-hwd9cad.jpg



    Strength Training over 50-36736079_2149888415255598_3051145312539246592_n.jpg
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  47. #147
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    Cycleicious, WTF does that weigh?? I'm not sure I could lift that.
    I like turtles

  48. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by NYrr496 View Post
    Cycleicious, WTF does that weigh?? I'm not sure I could lift that.

    In the pic I'm lifting 65lbs. I'm doing sets of reps so the weight is about 75% of my maximum effort for a split jerk (my max is 85lbs)
    Last edited by cyclelicious; 2 Weeks Ago at 09:07 AM.
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  49. #149
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    Damn.
    I like turtles

  50. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    cats invented yoga

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I thought it was moose? Mooses?

    Anyway.. I figured I'd chip in a couple pennies..
    I've been doing strength training since the week before Christmas.
    Friend of mine has a full-blown Nautilus Cafe in his garage..
    We change up a routine of 10 exercises every 12 weeks.. it's time to change again.. some of the exercises stay the same, we add & drop others in cycles..
    The set we just ended was:
    Lumbar
    Leg extensions
    Cycling squats
    Leg extensions
    Dorcy flexes (on the extension machine)
    Overhead pulldowns
    arm crosses
    rowing (on the arm cross machine)
    overhead tricep extensions (using the calf machine)
    hip abductions & adductions
    neck extensions
    ab crunches

    I told Roger today after we completed the set and cycle that I wanted to keep lumbar, cycling squats, arm crosses & rowing for the next cycle.. the rest was up to him.

    We'll see what next week has in store.
    We've alternated in and out bicep curls, tricep curls, pullovers, lateral raises, neck flexes..

    I changed my diet to ketogenic when I started working out.. currently down 50 lbs.. looking to drop 30 more..

    Just as an example.. I started doing lumbar at 80 lbs.. up to 245 as of today.. arm crosses started at 30lbs.. up to 73.. rowing started at 60 lbs.. up to 73.. overhead pulldown is up to 90 pounds.. 95lbs on hips..

    My back doesn't hurt anymore, my hips don't hurt anymore, I can climb stairs without pain, my sleep apnea is gone.. I can see definition coming into my legs..

    I've been able to hold more speed on the bike.. I can lift a 20" Load Range E tire on a styled rim onto an axle, rather than using a cheater bar to lever them up off the floor (I'm in the tire & service business)..
    "..well I was thumbin' through the Want Ads of the Shelby County Tribune, when this classified advertisement caught my eye.."

  51. #151
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    Geez, I started riding late in life, just before I was 50 and I had never set foot in a gym or lifted a weight in my life, until the end of May this year. I'm 53 now. My daughter got me into the gym and working with a trainer for a little while. I fully expected to hate it and have been pleasantly surprised that I enjoy it. The trainer kid has moved on to another job so I'm banging away it with my son and daughter now. It's surprising to me that for the little amount of time I've been going to the gym, that I can feel it in my riding, but I'm diggin' it.
    We have met the enemy, and it is us. Pogo

  52. #152
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    An interesting article about sweating: specifically whether you are a "salty sweater" and what to do


    6 Signs You Might be a Salty Sweater

    When it comes to understanding how to hydrate properly you need to consider two things: how much you’re sweating (i.e. your sweat rate—usually measured in ml per hour); and how much salt you’re losing in that sweat (your sweat concentration. i.e. how salty your sweat is). Understanding both of these gives you an overall appreciation of your net fluid and sodium losses over a given period of time. This enables you to work out a sensible personalized hydration plan.

    Your sweat rate varies a lot based on the temperature, how hard you’re working and a number of other factors. We’ve seen up to a 5 or 6 fold difference in sweat rates between athletes. Sweat concentration is something fewer athletes have a solid grasp on. It’s all about how much electrolyte (specifically, sodium) you lose in your sweat, and is generally a lot more stable than your sweat rate (it’s actually largely genetically determined).

    At Precision Hydration, we’ve tested athletes who lose less than 200mg of sodium per litre (32oz) of sweat and we’ve also seen athletes losing well over 2,300mg per liter! Our data suggests the average athlete loses around 950mg/l, which tallies with other large scale studies. But how do you know how much sodium you’re losing in your sweat? Getting your sweat tested is the easiest and most accurate way, but it is possible to estimate your losses and use this to optimize your hydration strategy. In fact, recent research (which we contributed to) found a strong correlation between what how much sodium athletes’ think they lose in their sweat and their actual sweat sodium concentration.

    That’s why why one of the questions we ask in our free Online Sweat Test is “How much salt do you think you lose in your sweat?” and why the online test is a very viable alternative for athletes trying to figure out if they might benefit from replacing more sodium using sports drinks and supplements. Still, people often ask for help with answering the question. So here are some signs to look out for that suggest that you may be a “salty sweater.”

    You get salty marks on your kit/skin.
    If you tend to get white, salty stains on your skin or clothing after training sessions or races, you might have saltier than average sweat.

    Remember that the drier the air, the faster your sweat will evaporate, which often results in more visible salt marks than in more humid conditions. (I see a lot more salt residue on my kit when I go running in Arizona than in Florida, for example). Also bear in mind that salt residue will be more visible on darker kit, so factor that into your observations. Oh, and ignore salt residue found on your kit after a triathlon where the swim was in the sea, for obvious reasons!

    If you have a very high sweat rate, it has to be said that the white marks might be a result of the sheer volume of sweat rather than because you necessarily have very salty sweat. But even if that’s the case, the presence of the salt residue suggests that your net losses might be on the high side and that you might benefit from a higher sodium intake.

    Your sweat tastes salty and/or stings your eyes (or cuts/grazes).
    Very salty sweat often stings your eyes and/or creates a burning sensation if it runs into cuts or grazes on your skin. This is why I rarely run without a cap or visor (with a built in sweat band) in the summer! As obvious as it may be (and as gross as it might sound) if you lick your arm when you’ve been sweating a lot and it tastes really salty, this can be another sign that you’re losing a lot of salt.

    And if you’ve ever had a dog take a keen interest in licking your legs after a long hot run or bike ride, it’s probably because they’re enjoying the salty taste, not just because they really, really like you. (sorry!)

    You feel faint or suffer head rushes when standing up quickly after exercise.
    This is another tell-tale sign that your sodium and fluid losses could be on the high side.

    When you lose a lot of salt and fluid (through your sweat), your blood volume/pressure drops. This makes it harder for your heart to get enough blood to your brain when you’re standing. Blood pools in your legs and not enough oxygen reaches your brain for a short period of time, causing the head rush or feeling of faintness. The medical term for this is orthostatic hypotension (literally ‘low blood pressure’).

    This used to happen to me regularly when I was in full time training, especially during the Summer, and losing a lot of sweat and salt can make athletes more susceptible.

    You suffer from muscle cramps during/after long periods of sweating.
    There’s a huge amount of anecdotal evidence that high sweat sodium losses can contribute to muscle cramping during and after exercise. If you’re someone who cramps up regularly during/after long endurance events, then this might be a sign that you’re losing a lot of salt (or not replacing what you’re losing effectively enough).

    You often feel terrible after exercising in the heat.
    If you often underperform or feel like crap after working out for a long time in hot conditions (and by that I mean more so than those around you, or more than you do after similar exertions in cooler conditions) then your net sodium losses might be on the higher side.

    This is especially true if…

    You crave salty foods during and after exercise.
    For us humans, the craving for salt is a deeply hardwired physiological trait.

    In fact, in terms of basic human drives, it’s up there with thirst when you’re low on body water, the desire to sleep when you’re tired and to get jiggy when choosing a mate.

    That’s because taking in sodium is crucial if your body is to preserve homeostasis (a balanced state), and in our evolutionary past, salt was not as freely available as it is today. So, we have a deep-rooted craving to replace lost salt when our levels get low.

    One study demonstrated that fact very neatly. Researchers offered people different soups and recorded which they ate more of when they’d been sweating on an exercise bike. People consistently showed an unconscious preference for saltier soup after they’d been sweating, which the researchers took to back up the idea that our bodies are very good at correcting salt deficiencies through dietary intake when needed.

    As a logical extension then, if you lose a very large amount of sodium in your sweat when exercising, you’re likely to exhibit a strong preference for salty foods in order to replace your losses. In other words, if you find yourself attracted to the salt shaker when you’ve been training a lot, this might be another sign that your body is trying to make up for a sodium deficit.

    What can you do if you are a salty sweater?
    If this article describes your experiences to a tee (at least 5 apply to you) then it’s highly likely that you’re losing a large amount of salt in your sweat (and/or a lot of sweat period!). If that’s the case, trying a more aggressive sodium replacement strategy might be a very good idea indeed. Try upping your sodium intake before, during and after periods of prolonged sweating. You can do this by adding more salt to your food / eating saltier foods or by reaching for an electrolyte supplement or sports drink. Keep in mind that of the most famous supplements don’t contain enough sodium to replace what the average person is losing, let alone the losses of a salty sweater. Look out for the stronger electrolyte drinks containing at least 1,000mg of sodium per litre (32oz).

    You can also take our free https://www.precisionhydration.com/p...ation-strategy to get some initial personalized hydration advice, including recommendations on what level of sodium supplementation might be right for you. You can use this to start a bit of your own trial-and-error testing in training to see whether it helps and refine from there.


    sauce https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/6...salty-sweater/
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  53. #153
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    Well i am late to this thread so i did not read each previous post.
    At 54 i did a year of gym not to get strong, not to get big but just for prevention.
    My genes allow me to do marathons without training but they take all the place, the power genes are not in me. I am an outdoor guy so i do mainly mountain biking with our cold winter it turns into fatbiking for 4 months.
    I just give myself small challenges to climb a hill and i am happy when i make it, it can be the first, fifth or tenth attempt.
    So i added 10 pounds of muscles in a year and being active allows me to keep it. At 60 near retirement than moving close to the trails to pedal daily for the next 30 years or more.
    I stretch, i smile, i eat veggies, this is my season

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