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  1. #1
    jalepenio jimenez
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    Shifting to 1x11

    In the last year I've converted both bikes to 1x11 and regret not doing it sooner.
    Thanks to the 42 tooth rear cog, this setup has proven itself to be far superior to my old 3x11 setups on earlier bikes.
    Age requires I power it all with a 28 tooth chainring, and find I don't use that 42 tooth cog all that much, but it's a life saver when the trail turns to gruel.
    I think 1x11 forces you (or allows you) to ride in a higher gear.
    Anyone else feel the same about 1x11?
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  2. #2
    Anytime. Anywhere.
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    I am quite happy to see the demise of the front derailleur. 28-42 is plenty low when the going gets steep and long.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

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    For me it depends on the bike. When I was riding a hardtail I would get out of the saddle and pedal and a 1x10 worked great, but now that my low back has forced me to a full suspension standing and pedaling just doesn't seem as efficient, so that the 1x would be to high of a gear for me while sitting. Granted a 1x11 might do the trick as I only have experience with a 1x10. I currently am running a 2x10 on my full suspension and it works for me.

  4. #4
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    1X11 here...won't go back.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    1X11 here...won't go back.
    I agree. I think it's one of the top 3 advancements ever for mountain biking. I have 11-42 with a 30 tooth chainring on all my bikes. A friend of mine runs a 28 up front and just threw on the new Shimano 11-46 for todays ride. I've yet to run across anybody with 1x12 yet but have seen it on a ton of bikes at the shop.
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  6. #6
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    I love the lack of chain clattering against the front derailleur with 1X Also: ease of shifting, chain retention, weight. I'm running 1x10 with a 30t chainring and 42t large sprocket. I think I'm going to upgrade to 11spd and get the Sunrace 11-46 because I'd like slightly lower gear.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomslang64 View Post
    I love the lack of chain clattering against the front derailleur with 1X Also: ease of shifting, chain retention, weight. I'm running 1x10 with a 30t chainring and 42t large sprocket. I think I'm going to upgrade to 11spd and get the Sunrace 11-46 because I'd like slightly lower gear.
    Shimano has an 11-46 now and e-thirteen has a 9-44 as other options.
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  8. #8
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    I went to 1x11 this year at 58...I don't miss the front derailleur at all!
    Friends don't let friends cheer for the TML

  9. #9
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    I say friends don't let friends buy a front derailleur in 2016. I'm not as popular when I say same about road bikes. Most who don't get that haven't shared my hit by a car experience.

    Even with a problematic wearing out knee a 32 x 42 on 29r works. Our Farley 9.6 is 27.5 fat with 28 x 42 and that's a bit more like old school granny gear. After being used to the 32 I don't always like it. I might think differently riding that fattie in winter soft snow.

  10. #10
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    Going from the 22x32 low on the 26" FSR to the 30x42 low on the 27.5+ Hendrix I lost the lowest gear. Tried it for 2 months and got tired of burning out early and/or suffering at the end of rides. On a trip to Colorado this summer I was walking the bike up steeps early so I had something left at the end of long rides. My buddy was happily spinning up on his 2x10, grrr. Forget that crap, I want to ride it all. Did some math and got a 26T ring and have been happy as a butcher's dog since. Don't use it often but I need it. Otherwise 1x11 is great other than the goofy looks of it.

    <- little bitty 26T
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bitflogger View Post
    Even with a problematic wearing out knee a 32 x 42 on 29r works.
    For YOU with YOUR knees and YOUR hills.
    My knees and my hills? No way. Not now, not 20 years ago (or 40), not ever.

  12. #12
    m66
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    Well, all of you just talking about the lowest gear, but I don't like 1*11 because of high gear. 32 *10/11 is not enough on flats. If I use 34 or 36 then I have problem with low gears. So 2*10/11 or 1*12 with 34-36 up front for me.

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  13. #13
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    42 cog, 28 ring, and 29r tires provides the same effective low gear as my old 3x9 26r had figuring in that going from 26" -> 29" increases all gears by about 10%. Pretty much all my riding is on rough twisty trails so the small end of the cassette sees very little if any use in the woods. I'm pretty happy with the gearing though I've never ridden a lower gear than that so don't know how practical it would be.

    I sometimes ride a mile or two on paved roads to get to trails and will occasionally spin out there. I imagine in more open terrain and/or on a faster bike I might want higher than I have now.
    Do the math.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    Shimano has an 11-46 now and e-thirteen has a 9-44 as other options.
    I wonder how the 9t sprocket behaves. That seems awfully small.

    Quote Originally Posted by m66 View Post
    Well, all of you just talking about the lowest gear, but I don't like 1*11 because of high gear. 32 *10/11 is not enough on flats. If I use 34 or 36 then I have problem with low gears. So 2*10/11 or 1*12 with 34-36 up front for me.

    Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
    What size wheels? I can barely spin out 30 x 11 with my 27.5 bike on flat ground. I occasionally find myself wanting a higher gear in descents, but not often enough to go through with an XD freehub and expensive cassette upgrade.

  15. #15
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    What flats? Up and then down. Sometimes a bit of road to get there, but who cares about road on a mountain bike?
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    What flats? Up and then down. Sometimes a bit of road to get there, but who cares about road on a mountain bike?
    Also this.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    I agree. I think it's one of the top 3 advancements ever for mountain biking. I have 11-42 with a 30 tooth chainring on all my bikes. A friend of mine runs a 28 up front and just threw on the new Shimano 11-46 for todays ride. I've yet to run across anybody with 1x12 yet but have seen it on a ton of bikes at the shop.
    I have nothing against 1x and agree with the benefits listed by others on this thread, but it is definitely not even close to the top of the list in important MTB advancements (those would be disc brakes, good suspension damping, and frame geometry). It does not make your bike work appreciably better. You can get a better / closer gear range using a multiple chainring setup.

  18. #18
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    I love the silence of the 1 x 11. I run 34t up front with an 11-40 cassette. I'll be 54 in October.
    My name is Chris and I ride a Prophet 650b with a Lefty.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prophet Julio View Post
    I love the silence of the 1 x 11. I run 34t up front with an 11-40 cassette. I'll be 54 in October.
    Just curious: Why would a 1x setup be quieter than a properly tuned 2x setup? I don't get any noise from my front derailleur except when shifting. The clutch rear mech definitely reduced chain-slap noise but that has nothing to do with the chainring setup.

  20. #20
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    I've got a 22/36 up front and 11/36 in the rear. The only way I get that same range from a 1x is to have a 30T up front with a 9/50 rear. Don't think they're making that yet.

    And yes, I do use my full range now.

  21. #21
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    I ran a 3 x 9 prior. The clutch on the 11 speed RD is the biggest difference. No chain slap or bounce. I think any 2 x 11 with a clutch would be the same. Just saying I love the quiet after coming from the clatter of my 3 x 9 which wasn't too bad to begin with, but silence is so quiet.
    My name is Chris and I ride a Prophet 650b with a Lefty.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by panchosdad View Post
    I've got a 22/36 up front and 11/36 in the rear. The only way I get that same range from a 1x is to have a 30T up front with a 9/50 rear. Don't think they're making that yet.
    They do make a 10x50.

    I gave up the front derailer over 10 years ago, at least off road, by using a Rohloff inernal gear hub for when I wanted more than one gear (lots of single-speed miles during that time). I just got on a SRAM XX1 1x11 setup (32t chainring, 1-42 cassette) and am quite impressed -- far quieter and lighter than the Rohloff, if not as quick shifting or as robust.

    As a more-often-than-not single speeder I've gotten over the issue of gearing range long ago, both for the high and low end. The high end in particular is never an issue for off-pavement riding, and I expect people who claim a 32x10 (88 gear inches on a 29er) isn't enough aren't spinning what either a SS or Roadie would consider all that fast -- 32x10 spun at 120 rpm (doable with practice) gets a 29er with 175mm crankarms to 31.6 mph. Heck, even 90 rpm gets you to 23.7 mph. On the low end, my balance pretty much sucks at really low speeds so I'm usually putting a foot down before anything easier than 32x42 (pretty much 20 gear inches and below) comes into play.

    I agree with the earlier statement that the modern 1x drivetrains are one of the most significant developments in mountain biking. YMMV for sure on this one -- I put lots of miles in on a V-brake equipped rigid single speed, so what do I know?
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skooks View Post
    Just curious: Why would a 1x setup be quieter than a properly tuned 2x setup? I don't get any noise from my front derailleur except when shifting. The clutch rear mech definitely reduced chain-slap noise but that has nothing to do with the chainring setup.
    Agreed, my 2x10 is just as quite as the 1x10 I used to run...but neither are as quite as my single speed.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skooks View Post
    Just curious: Why would a 1x setup be quieter than a properly tuned 2x setup? I don't get any noise from my front derailleur except when shifting. The clutch rear mech definitely reduced chain-slap noise but that has nothing to do with the chainring setup.
    Chain slap against the front derailleur cage accounts for almost all drivetrain noise.
    Last edited by boomslang64; 09-13-2016 at 03:56 AM.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomslang64 View Post
    Chain slap against the front derailleur cage accounts for almost all drivetrain noise.

    Nope

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ptor View Post
    As a more-often-than-not single speeder I've gotten over the issue of gearing range long ago, both for the high and low end. The high end in particular is never an issue for off-pavement riding, and I expect people who claim a 32x10 (88 gear inches on a 29er) isn't enough aren't spinning what either a SS or Roadie would consider all that fast -- 32x10 spun at 120 rpm (doable with practice) gets a 29er with 175mm crankarms to 31.6 mph. Heck, even 90 rpm gets you to 23.7 mph. On the low end, my balance pretty much sucks at really low speeds so I'm usually putting a foot down before anything easier than 32x42 (pretty much 20 gear inches and below) comes into play.

    I used to ride 3 x 9 with a top gear of 46 x 11....I would spin this out on the doubletrack and logging roads after the single track descents on the way out....

    I could pass guys that were spun out with their 1 x 11s

    Great fun to race.....

    Now I have a 1 x 11 32 tooth elipitical and a 44 x 10....Now I spin out with the rest of them....

    Yes I miss the top end.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    Nope
    Are you serious? Have you ridden with and without a front derailleur? It's pretty obvious that it causes most of the sound.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomslang64 View Post
    Are you serious? Have you ridden with and without a front derailleur? It's pretty obvious that it causes most of the sound.
    Yes I have ridden a 3 x 9 for twelve years, and just switched to a 1 x 11.

    The 3 x 9 had some chain slap against the chainstay basically due to the long cage RD.

    Very little to none from the FD.

    The 1 X 11 has very little chain slap against the chain stay due to the short cage RD with a clutch.

    All one has to do is look at the wear patterns on the bike.

  29. #29
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    I should add that ridding down hill in granny on the front and little ring on the back will begin to cause FD noises....and of course more chain slap.

    Shift to middle ring and again almost no FD noise.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudflap View Post
    In the last year I've converted both bikes to 1x11 and regret not doing it sooner.
    Thanks to the 42 tooth rear cog, this setup has proven itself to be far superior to my old 3x11 setups on earlier bikes.
    Age requires I power it all with a 28 tooth chainring, and find I don't use that 42 tooth cog all that much, but it's a life saver when the trail turns to gruel.
    I think 1x11 forces you (or allows you) to ride in a higher gear.
    Anyone else feel the same about 1x11?
    It's nice, but crushed ice is still a better invention.

    34 ring and 11-40 on one bike.
    30 ring and 11-42 on another.

    Still prefer a double chainring on my road bike.
    And still prefer one ring and one cog on my Singlespeed.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    I should add that ridding down hill in granny on the front and little ring on the back will begin to cause FD noises....and of course more chain slap.

    Shift to middle ring and again almost no FD noise.
    I was never able to get rid of the noise over rough terrain with a front derailleur, no matter what gear.

  32. #32
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    26 x 11-40, not the top end I want, but plenty of bottom end. Gearing is easy enough to adjust for terrain.

    Even the best 1x derailleur has chain slap.

    I don't miss front derailleurs, but a 2x will alwsys have more potential range. If I were touring or bikepacking, I'd take a 2x.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skooks View Post
    I have nothing against 1x and agree with the benefits listed by others on this thread, but it is definitely not even close to the top of the list in important MTB advancements (those would be disc brakes, good suspension damping, and frame geometry). It does not make your bike work appreciably better. You can get a better / closer gear range using a multiple chainring setup.
    I think you underestimate it a bit, even as I agree it isn't as big as geometry and brakes and suspension and let's throw dropper posts in there too, there is an almost emotional component to it also that isn't to be dismissed. The logistics of shifting that crappy (and aren't they always kind of crappy?) front derailleur really suck energy, time and focus away from where it can be used for more fun and speed. Not having to worry about down or upshifting that extra derailleur is huge! 50 years old here with 1x10, 30x40 and I do ok. I don't mind hike-a-bike when it's not low enough.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomslang64 View Post
    I was never able to get rid of the noise over rough terrain with a front derailleur, no matter what gear.
    Causes may include

    Old low quality RD

    Worn out RD

    Badly set-up RD

    Poor shifting

    Old Loose Chain...

    And the biggy old mechanic.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by WillN View Post
    The logistics of shifting that crappy (and aren't they always kind of crappy?) front derailleur really suck energy, time and focus away from where it can be used for more fun and speed. Not having to worry about down or upshifting that extra derailleur is huge!
    I think YMMV is appropriate here, having used both I can honestly say that front shifting doesn't suck time, energy, focus or fun from my ride.

    Modern wide range 1x's are a significant evolution in drivetrain development but not revolutionary IMO, people have been single ringing it since the inception of mountain bikes.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by GiantTurd View Post
    Because most 100 mile races have long dirt road or road segments that you need a taller gear for.
    I've ridden the Leadville 100 four times. That race is renowned/condemned/ridiculed for having smooth fast downhills and significant road sections. One would think you'd need big gears to do that well, but what you really need is to possess a moderate-sized engine, an ability to suffer, and the ability to breathe pretty well at altitude. I went under 9 hours all 4 times (finished in the top 25 three times) and never had my largest gear bigger than 88 gear inches (a 13x44 on my 26er) and that's equivalent to a 32x10 on a 29er. You do not need a taller gear than afforded by a 1x11 for long dirt road or paved segments in a 100 mile race. Heck, single speeders finish Leadville in under 9 hours.
    "The plural of anecdote is not data." -- Attributed to various people in a variety of forms, but always worth remembering...

  37. #37
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    Did I mention that my 1 x 11 is much quieter that my old 3 x 9? I lost the FD after 2 changes. First was a conversion from 26" to 27.5" on the same bike. Next was fatter tires on wide rims. No room for the FD, rub rub rub.. I do not miss it at all. In fact, I am happy to be free of it.
    My name is Chris and I ride a Prophet 650b with a Lefty.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by GiantTurd View Post
    Wow, you are really awesome!
    I apologize for having irritated you -- that wasn't my intent. It was not my intent to be self aggrandizing, rather it was to relate that an average cyclist could post a reasonably fast time on a course notorious for smooth, fast sections using a relatively low top-end gear.

    Quote Originally Posted by GiantTurd View Post
    Not everybody rides the same way...
    Precisely! I read your your statement as meaning the the collective "You", meaning cyclists in general need a tall gear for many 100 mile races. My argument is that's not true for many, and I would posit for most.


    Quote Originally Posted by GiantTurd View Post
    ...I raced many 100 milers on a SS and sub 9 hours, what does that have to do with price of tea in China?
    Wow, you are really awesome! Oh...uh...errr...actually here I again assumed something I shouldn't have -- not everyone would know that the the 9 hour mark at the Leadville 100 is the cutoff to get awarded the "Big Belt Buckle", versus the smaller one (still rather large) that you get if you finish with a time greater than 9 hours but less than 12 hours. In any given year, less than 10% of finishers earn the big buckle. (Just an FYI for anyone contemplating the race).

    Quote Originally Posted by GiantTurd View Post
    That has nothing to do with it, people are all different, 1 x 11 does NOT work for everyone. ... Ride what you want BUT because you like does not mean everyone else has too.
    I totally agree. And what I thought I was responding too in your previous message was your assertion (or that's how I read it and would read it again without your followup) that the "collective you", when racing 100 milers, need the taller gear of a 2x10 or 3x10 setup. I now realize you were referencing "yourself". I apologize for reading into your statement a meaning that was not apparently intended.

    Happy trails!
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  39. #39
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    I recently built fat bikes for my brother and father. I did them both 1x11 to keep it simple and as light as possible. Neither one of them is a very experienced rider.
    Both bikes have 28 tooth chainrings and 11-44 cassettes. I rode them both a little and while they have plenty of range, my 2x10, 33/24, 11-36 has a little more.
    I like turtles

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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I think YMMV is appropriate here, having used both I can honestly say that front shifting doesn't suck time, energy, focus or fun from my ride.

    Modern wide range 1x's are a significant evolution in drivetrain development but not revolutionary IMO, people have been single ringing it since the inception of mountain bikes.
    Fair enough. I'd say removing a component from the cockpit and front of your chain is a de facto simplification, but I can imagine it isn't highly significant especially if you have a well tuned front derailleur/shifter setup. I am probably thinking of this as one of a lot of little things that can make a difference at the margins of performance--getting up that annoying little tech uphill where you need to shift and might miss it. Thinking about that shift does take some focus. And I think adding up a lot of little things like this can really make riding more fun and focused on the actual riding rather than the more 'logistical' aspects like shifting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WillN View Post
    I think you underestimate it a bit, even as I agree it isn't as big as geometry and brakes and suspension and let's throw dropper posts in there too, there is an almost emotional component to it also that isn't to be dismissed. The logistics of shifting that crappy (and aren't they always kind of crappy?) front derailleur really suck energy, time and focus away from where it can be used for more fun and speed. Not having to worry about down or upshifting that extra derailleur is huge! 50 years old here with 1x10, 30x40 and I do ok. I don't mind hike-a-bike when it's not low enough.
    Why do you think that fd's are inherently crappy? A properly adjusted fd shifts just as well if not better than a rear derailleur. It's not anymore difficult to operate. I don't care if people want to run 1x but please don't pretend that front derailleurs are complicated, don't work well, or are difficult to use.

  42. #42
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    The advent of the modern dropper post is a far, far more significant development than any recent drivetrain advancements. Running a 1x setup makes the control of the dropper post a little easier than with a 2x setup, and that is the only reason I would ever go to a 1x setup. I might do it someday, but I'm in no hurry. My 2x10 setup works great (36/22 front 11/36 rear, 29er). If you don't like shifting the front, think of it as a 1x with a 36t ring, with the option of shifting to a lower range when needed. The 22x36 gear is low enough that I usually run out of traction before running out of low-end range, which is how things should be. I'm 52, climb a lot, and like attempting steep climbs, as long as they don't get too rocky or too loose. No way do I want to get off and walk just because I don't have the right gears--or destroy my back trying to push a too-high gear. I also do lots of mixed-terrain rides (including my commute) and I actually spin out the 36/11 gear while taking the lane on a paved downhill that I ride frequently. And oh--I can buy a new cassette for $40-50, and new (non narrow-wide) chainrings are also pretty cheap as well, and I can use cheaper 10 speed chains. And just to piss off half the people here, I'll add one more comment: I'd take a Shimano 3x, 2x, or 1x setup over any SRAM setup.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skooks View Post
    Why do you think that fd's are inherently crappy? A properly adjusted fd shifts just as well if not better than a rear derailleur. It's not anymore difficult to operate. I don't care if people want to run 1x but please don't pretend that front derailleurs are complicated, don't work well, or are difficult to use.
    I'm just going from my experience, I'm not pretending, promise! My own bikes and those of friends, the front derailleur is a bit harder to use in my experience. Perhaps it takes more force because it lifts the chain from a small ring to a larger ring than you would have in the rear? I don't doubt your experience, if you say it shifts fine than ok.

    My greater point is don't underestimate the simplification in riding overall that can happen when you eliminate this component. I guess it is a more minor version of the reason people sometimes love single speed. When you take away a choice, things are simpler, simpler can mean more attention is given to other factors. Not saying it is for everyone--I enjoy mountain biking in fairly tough conditions and 1x and the resulting simplification works best for me. If I were riding on more smooth trails with smaller hills I might appreciate multiple rings in the front also.

    As with all things bike, there are of course advantages and disadvantages to every choice you make. I was only trying to point out one advantage that I don't hear espoused as often, forgive my conceit.

    Will

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by WillN View Post
    I'm just going from my experience, I'm not pretending, promise! My own bikes and those of friends, the front derailleur is a bit harder to use in my experience. Perhaps it takes more force because it lifts the chain from a small ring to a larger ring than you would have in the rear? I don't doubt your experience, if you say it shifts fine than ok.

    My greater point is don't underestimate the simplification in riding overall that can happen when you eliminate this component. I guess it is a more minor version of the reason people sometimes love single speed. When you take away a choice, things are simpler, simpler can mean more attention is given to other factors. Not saying it is for everyone--I enjoy mountain biking in fairly tough conditions and 1x and the resulting simplification works best for me. If I were riding on more smooth trails with smaller hills I might appreciate multiple rings in the front also.

    As with all things bike, there are of course advantages and disadvantages to every choice you make. I was only trying to point out one advantage that I don't hear espoused as often, forgive my conceit.

    Will

    I would agree that front derailleurs work better in some cases than others.

    On my fat bike, I have a 33 tooth ring and a 24 tooth ring. This setup shifts flawlessly. I look at other bikes with let's say a 28 and a 42 and I would think they don't shift up anywhere near as easily as my bike.
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  45. #45
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    I've been on 1x for a few years, started with an XC bike that came as a 3x, converted to 1x around ~2008. It was 9 speeds then....

    My HT is 1x10, 32, 11-40.
    FS 1x10, 32-44.

    When I have more disposable income, I may go 1x11 on the FS.

    It is interesting that the Sram Eagle has a 10 cog. I'd like to have a 10 cog on a 10-36 cassette and add the aftermarket large cog... (The ~11-40 and similar range cassettes are pretty pricy!)
    "Don't ride faster than your guardian angel can fly"

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bail_Monkey View Post
    I've been on 1x for a few years....(The ~11-40 and similar range cassettes are pretty pricy!)
    I just looked at pricing for Shimano M8000 1x11 cassettes and they can be had for $65 US at multiple places online. That doesn't include shifter or BB/crank however.
    White Clouds - Heart of Idaho

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    i pulled my front mech off as well. hardly ever used the big ring except riding to the trails on the street olus i wanted to mount my dropper seat post and try to keep the cockpit clean. i have not replaced the front double ring as i am going to purchase a new bike this year (and it will be a 1x11 or 12) and i might want to put the mech back on and maybe sell the bike. i don't miss it at all!

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    Probably one of the best advances in recent years has been the choice we have of excellent components not matter how many gears you need and what configuration you want.
    I just fitted an XT 1 x 11 drivetrain ( 34 with 11/42) to my son's Whyte T130. It is superbly smooth and light shifting and he loves it, but he's just been moaning to me that he wished it had more range at both ends. Now he is a superbly fit 34 year old who can spin out at one end and has to push up some climbs at the other end. But he wont go back to 2 x 10.
    I ride the same routes as my son. I on the other hand am an arthritic, post heart ablation, well knackered 67 year old and run a Cotic Soul with a X9/XO drivetrain (34/22 double and 11/36 cassette). The drivetrain runs smoothly and shifts faultlessly. Yes it needs a little more maintenance as do my XT hubs which I would never swap for cartridge hubs.
    One comment I hear is that it is quicker to walk than use the lowest of my gears. It may very well be, but that's missing the point of riding steep hills.
    Back to my original point, that we are spoilt for choice for great components. It don't matter what your choice is cos they can all work flawlessly if looked after, will get you up or down any trail you choose and still put a big grin on your face.

  49. #49
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    No, is pure BS. I can ride very slowly up hill in a 28-42 and be faster than walking it. Also so what? 11-42 gives me more range than I can use on my local trails so this is a non issue for me and my friends.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    No, is pure BS. I can ride very slowly up hill in a 28-42 and be faster than walking it. Also so what? 11-42 gives me more range than I can use on my local trails so this is a non issue for me and my friends.
    I have nothing but pure admiration for you and your friends. It knows no bounds. They must be really fit 50+ers.

  51. #51
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    Yes, 1x11 forces us to get stronger. I'm running 32t Oval front and 42-10 XX1 cassette. I finally got past relying on the 42t granny cog for climbs - I'm mostly on the 36t machined steel cog now, only using the 40t as a bailout, on steep climbs. My goal this season is to turn my bailout gear as the 36t and only use the 32t for most everything else. So far, my power-to-weight ratio is getting better, as I do all my trail rides in a fasted state now. Doing HIIT cardio before breakfast has shed 60lbs and now reveals abs I have not seen since High School!

    Next year, I'm gonna crank up the fitness 3 notches and build the Titanium Lynskey SS 29er frame that has been sitting in storage, into a 19-pound do-it-all bike. Who says being fifty has to suck?
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  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    No, is pure BS. I can ride very slowly up hill in a 28-42 and be faster than walking it. Also so what? 11-42 gives me more range than I can use on my local trails so this is a non issue for me and my friends.
    There will come a time when you are going to need a wider range IF you are lucky unless you move some place like FL or IA. plugp7 made an excellent point. Hope to still be able to ride at his age.

    Haven't tried 1x myself. Haven't changed bikes since it came out and there is no reason to upgrade since I am perfectly happy using a 2x.

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    1X is it for me and I'm never going back. I converted my Trek Remedy to 1X10 (28t-11/36) and my new Intense Primer is 1X11 (30t-10/42). Both are very well suited for the type of riding I do in Central Texas. I can't imagine needing any more range on the top end, but could see possibly putting a 28t on my Primer next time I ride in Colorado.

  54. #54
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    28-42 on my 650b is the same as my old 22-34 26er. Pretty dang low. if I need lower I can put a 26t on the front and still not miss a high gear except on a road once in a while. I don't care at all about gearing on the road because it's a mountain bike. Also there are a couple of 11-46 cassettes that I can throw on as well.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by azjeff View Post
    Going from the 22x32 low on the 26" FSR to the 30x42 low on the 27.5+ Hendrix I lost the lowest gear. Tried it for 2 months and got tired of burning out early and/or suffering at the end of rides. On a trip to Colorado this summer I was walking the bike up steeps early so I had something left at the end of long rides. My buddy was happily spinning up on his 2x10, grrr. Forget that crap, I want to ride it all. Did some math and got a 26T ring and have been happy as a butcher's dog since. Don't use it often but I need it. Otherwise 1x11 is great other than the goofy looks of it.

    <- little bitty 26T
    I run X9 26t x 11-40 on my Hendrix, works great for all but the meatiest climbs. I'm upgrading to GX 1 x 11, Sunrace 11-46, which allows me to run a 28t chainring, and I get more top end AND more bottom end.

    Arguing about the necessity of wide gear ranges is old hat on the rest of MTBR, like droppers, the way you manage your gears is just a choice, no reason to push an agenda on people.

    I don't like front or rear derailleurs, I'm holding out for a Pinion

  56. #56
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    I just bought a new bike and it comes with the SRAM Eagle drivetrain, 12 speed, 32T front, 10-50T rear. I'm excited to be ditching the front derailleur - served me well over the years but one less thing to worry about. Will report back after I get a few rides on the bike, I pick it up tonight.

  57. #57
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    I made a comparison table between 30s systems vs some currently available 11s (gear ratio, rotational mass and bike speed at 90rpm). At botton line, it's safe to say that for me, a 32T front ring + 11-46 cassette solves it..

    cheers..

    WFB
    Attached Files Attached Files

  58. #58
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    While I think the 1X stuff is great, I do too much double shifting. I'm running 2X8 with 46/34 and 11/28 on a MTB converted to road. Works for what I'm doing. And I'll wait till things start wearing out to consider any changes. But my front derailleur has seen two different bikes and the rear has seen 3. Had to replace jockey wheels once, but they just keep going. I just don't see me making the change.

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudflap View Post
    In the last year I've converted both bikes to 1x11 and regret not doing it sooner.
    Thanks to the 42 tooth rear cog, this setup has proven itself to be far superior to my old 3x11 setups on earlier bikes.
    Age requires I power it all with a 28 tooth chainring, and find I don't use that 42 tooth cog all that much, but it's a life saver when the trail turns to gruel.
    I think 1x11 forces you (or allows you) to ride in a higher gear.
    Anyone else feel the same about 1x11?
    Great post. I like that you posted that you're on a 28t front to get that low gear. It works but it's not awesome since it doesn't spin well and it pulls on some suspension systems, causing more bob. Heck, I even have friends that are on a 26t front.

    The new 1x11's now have a 46t rear. And that 50t on Eagle is good too to allow a 30-32t front and have great range still.
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    I keep upgrading frames and forks but I'm still with 2x9 22/34 front, 12-34 back. 29er FS, age 58, Colorado. Never had a problem with FDs, still need my 22front/34rear granny gear all the time (slickrock being a perfect example). Here in CO you are almost always going up steep (need very small gears) or coming down steep (don't pedal much at all). The only advantage I could see to 1x (given that I can get the same gearing) is a quieter chain coming downhill. Chris.

  61. #61
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    Personally I'll never own another front derailleur. {tears of joy}
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  62. #62
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    When I went 1X I made sure that I kept the same low gear inch that I had on my ancient 9 speed. My cross bike still has a front derailleur but it sees almost no use these days. If I was going to ride it more I would dump that one as well.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

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    Yep, all three of my bikes are now 1x11 SRAM and I am pretty sure I will not go back. I suspect that my next bike will be 1x12.

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    The only advantage I could see to 1x (given that I can get the same gearing) is a quieter chain coming downhill. Chris.
    And when you're not pedaling going downhill, no noise.
    I've never had a problem with chain noise from a front derailleur. I always just move the lever a bit.
    I have this old SunTour VX derailleur I've had since the mid '80's. I can't even make it throw a chain.

  65. #65
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    I upgraded my bikes to 2x10 about 5 years ago and I thought that was superior than 3x drivetrains. It had plenty of range and only 2 chainrings to deal with! I rode thousands of miles with this setup. I believed this was my "ideal" setup.

    Fast forward to February 2016 when I bought a Trek Top Fuel 9.8 with 1x11 drivetrain. I rode the Trek about 2000 miles last year and totally fell in love with the SRAM 1x11. I noticed I shift a lot more (to maintain the proper rpms), but shifting is smooth and effortless.

    In the 2x setup, I was frequently shifting between the small and large front chainrings. When shifting between the 2 front chainrings, I would also have to shift the rear der to maintain the desired rpm. 1x11 simplified all of this...just shift up or down until you get the gear that you need.

    1x11 has made riding more enjoyable. I will not go back!

  66. #66
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    Loving my 1x12 SRAM Eagle setup. I went 32T in the front, may drop that to 30T for a little more granny gear this summer (lot's of long steep climbs in the mountains). I highly recommend the setup. No more front derailleur for me - ever.

  67. #67
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    I did this a few years ago and I can generally say after almost 30 years of riding the 1x setup was the most amazing difference on the bike that I can point too.



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    Since switching to 1x11 I would never go back to a front derailleur setup. What made me switch was the seatpost dropper lever location. I still have a bike with a front derailleur and two bikes 1x11. Finding the right pedal sprocket took some time as I tried a 32 tooth oval and ended up with a 30 tooth round.
    Last edited by Kootbiker; 02-13-2017 at 10:01 AM. Reason: Spelling

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    ... I even have friends that are on a 26t front.

    The new 1x11's now have a 46t rear. And that 50t on Eagle is good too to allow a 30t-32t front and have great range still.
    That 46t and 50t are my future. 50t would allow me to up the front chain ring to a 32t and still be a little lower geared than my current 28t/42t. Likewise if I were to switch to 30t/46t.
    White Clouds - Heart of Idaho

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by wfbueno View Post
    I made a comparison table between 30s systems vs some currently available 11s (gear ratio, rotational mass and bike speed at 90rpm). At botton line, it's safe to say that for me, a 32T front ring + 11-46 cassette solves it..

    cheers..


    WFB
    I like your chart, very informative for selecting a 1x drivetrain.

  71. #71
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    26 x 11-46 on all my wheels, great climbing gears, 46t is a bailout, only use it when I need a break on long climbs.

    Gear choices are dictated by terrain, some folks have the benefit of well graded trails, others have to deal with less ideal trail designs.

    Bragging about not needing climbing gears says more about where you ride than how you ride, just saying...

    North Central Cascades, straight up, straight down, gotta love motos.

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    ...

    Gear choices are dictated by terrain, some folks have the benefit of well graded trails, others have to deal with less ideal trail designs.

    Bragging about not needing climbing gears says more about where you ride than how you ride, just saying...

    ...
    /\/\ This.

    I live half an hour from Oakridge, OR and feel the same way. Gotta go low if you wanna climb Alpine, Hardesty, Fuji, etc. I run a 28t chainring because 28t is the smallest ring a Surly Mr. Whirly crank accepts (n/w direct mount) and Whirly is the only production 185mm crank I can find. I gots long legs. But I'd put a 26t on there if they made one for it.
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  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Gear choices are dictated by terrain

    Yes to some degree but mostly gear choices are dictated by the brain and legs. Just ask any single speeder
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  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    mostly gear choices are dictated by the brain and legs
    and knees

  75. #75
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    ^^put a lower gear on, your brain says your knees won't take it if you don't use it.

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by andytiedye View Post
    and knees
    Went 1x11 1 1/2 season ago. Started out 30x42 using the 42 as a bail out gear. Wasn't enough when going faster so I went 32x42 and started using the 42. The last half of the season my old knee's have been bothering me so I will go back to the 30x42 but add a SRAM cassette (10-42) for faster days. I have also read an oval chain ring might help the knee's.

  77. #77
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    I just switched everything up last week, bike wise. Picked up a 2016 Niner RKT to replace my 2005 FSR Expert.

    I was very skeptical about the 1x11 (32t chaining with a 11x42 cassette)! One ride in on the local trails and I can already say I'll be fine.

    I'll probably get a 30t and/or a 28t for when we head to the steeper areas.

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  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    Shimano has an 11-46 now and e-thirteen has a 9-44 as other options.
    Sunrace makes a BETTER 11-46. Shimano jumps from 38-48 were Sunrace decided to jump from 40 to 46. Smaller gap is muey bueno!
    In serving the wicked, expect no reward, and be thankful if you escape injury for your pains.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stalkerfiveo View Post
    Sunrace makes a BETTER 11-46. Shimano jumps from 38-48 were Sunrace decided to jump from 40 to 46. Smaller gap is muey bueno!
    Your right about Sunrace. I have been running Shimano 11/40 with a one up 45 added on and it seems to be Ok. The jump from 38 to 46 seems like too much.

  80. #80
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    Box Two 11-46 Tooth 11 Speed Cassette > Components > Drivetrain > Cassettes | Jenson USA

    Box is making one too. Saw this on a bike at the LBS.

    Cogs: 11-13-15-18-21-24-28-32-36-40-46
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  81. #81
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    What derailleur are you using with the 11-46 cassette?

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  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by DM-SC View Post
    What derailleur are you using with the 11-46 cassette?

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
    My GX mid cage worked just fine with the Sunrace 11-46. Shifted nice and smooth and the B screw was plenty long enough.
    In serving the wicked, expect no reward, and be thankful if you escape injury for your pains.

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by DM-SC View Post
    What derailleur are you using with the 11-46 cassette?

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    Shimano XT M8000 with the clutch, medium cage.

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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Yes to some degree but mostly gear choices are dictated by the brain and legs. Just ask any single speeder
    Well, as a single speeder and muni rider, I disagree wholeheartedly. What makes a single speeder ride single speed is the simplicity and the challenge, not how hard it is to climb.

    Having walked my single speed up more than a few climbs, I have no misconceptions about the purpose of gearing.

    Try muni, then talk to me about about gearing, single speed bikes ain't nothin' but easy.

    Back on topic: my low budget 11sp set up is GX with Sunrace, I run a Blackspire Elliptical on some Next SL/Turbines cranks, they run as smoothly as my first gen X1, but at a much lower price point and with greater durability.

    I can't see needing a wider range, but if my budget could afford it, I suppose I'd spring for the Eagle.

    Though I'm still building wheels with aluminum rims, so I'm not sure I'd cut loose the cash... now if you want to talk hubs.: Onyx.

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Yes to some degree but mostly gear choices are dictated by the brain and legs. Just ask any single speeder

    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Well, as a single speeder and muni rider, I disagree wholeheartedly.

    I guess I was just trying to say that one persons granny might be a 46t cog while another rider gets by just fine with a 32t on the same trails. Fitness riding style are obviously factors as well as terrain.
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I guess I was just trying to say that one persons granny might be a 46t cog while another rider gets by just fine with a 32t on the same trails. Fitness riding style are obviously factors as well as terrain.
    I also think the weight of your bike has a lot to do with your selection of gearing.

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kootbiker View Post
    I also think the weight of your bike has a lot to do with your selection of gearing.
    And how fat your tires are. And how tall your wheels are. So many factors play into this.
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    Great discussion! I've been on the slow end of most of the revolutions (no pun intended but now that I notice it....ha) ....slow to get into FS, still riding 26", still tubes, like my grip shift, just got a dropper (best invention IMO) so the gearing 1X or even 2X wasn't even in my mind.

    I got a chance to ride some new bikes in Whistler last September and enjoyed the 1X Shimano although I did miss my 24X36 granny.

    Great to see gearing ratios but I can't imagine redoing my drive train on my 2012 Trance. The new geometry and 27.5 sizes are appealing but my bike and riding still thrills me. (I think I'd rather get a kayak, than a new bike???)

    Does anyone think it is worth the re build? I'd love to hear the suggestions.

  89. #89
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    My buddy had a 26er Trance with dropper and it got stolen a year ago so he had to replace it a little sooner than planned. He got a Devenci Troy with SRAM GX 1x11, RS Pike, and a dropper. That Troy took his riding up to a whole new level. He could always climb well, but now his descending matches.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Can2pir View Post
    Great discussion!...Does anyone think it is worth the re build? I'd love to hear the suggestions.
    I transitioned to 1x on my 26" ride a year before I bought a new 27.5" bike with the same 1x platform: XT M8000.

    Cost about $500 to do the first switch, but about $4500 for the second. lol

    You can do a change out now for less money, and my personal opinion hasn't changed: do it.
    White Clouds - Heart of Idaho

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    Ya, the XTM8000 sounds the best but $500? yikes, that's a long way to MY second option! Thanks though, you pushed me one step closer!

  92. #92
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    If you are riding a 2x or 3x now, you already have the parts for a 1x.
    Use your existing crank spider with the chainring of choice (which you may have to buy: 28t, 30t, 32t, etc.) ditch the front D and shifter, and you are riding a 1x.
    Like I said, probably can be done for less money if you're creative.
    White Clouds - Heart of Idaho

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudflap View Post
    If you are riding a 2x or 3x now, you already have the parts for a 1x.
    Use your existing crank spider with the chainring of choice (which you may have to buy: 28t, 30t, 32t, etc.) ditch the front D and shifter, and you are riding a 1x.
    Like I said, probably can be done for less money if you're creative.
    Wow, you're right! I was worried about the 11 spd fitting my 9 spd hub but my short research says it does (I just bought a new rear wheel!)

    I spend a lot of time in my middle ring 32x11-34 so a 30x11-42 would make me only lose some (useless) high end. (I agree that my 5" of suspension belongs on trails, with short road access rides!)

    Losing the front D is appealing, means new shifters and rear D......hmmmm

  94. #94
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    Well, I was hipper than I thought!

    My 26" FSR was 1x9 that I never removed the 22t, 42t and front derailleur/shifter from.

    In fact, I'm not even sure the front derailleur even works...it's been a way long time since I tried it.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
    Never be afraid to try something new.

    Remember amateurs built the Ark.
    Professionals built the Titanic.

  95. #95
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    Have been on 1x11 for two rides now on my new 26" fatty, before 2x9 on a 26" fat and 3x9 on a 29er.

    Knowing that the 32t up front was going to be hard for me on climbs went with a 28t, my only complain is that sometimes feel like I'm spinning too much on the flats. Being a pedal masher is a bit different but now I wonder why I didn't considering this earlier, really enjoying the new gear combos and using cogs that before will never use.

    Question, will a 9spd hub take a 11spd cassette? Considering going 1x on the 29er.

  96. #96
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    As a newbie getting into the sport(I have an old Cannondale rigid but haven't ridden it much), I really appreciate the simplicity of 1x11. I am putting a dropper post lever on left side, hope I like the dropper post, should be easier getting on and off bike and maybe not so scary downhills.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DiRt DeViL View Post
    Question, will a 9spd hub take a 11spd cassette? Considering going 1x on the 29er.
    All shimano and Sram NX 11 speed cassettes use traditional 8/9/10 cassette body. Other Sram cassettes require Sram XD driver body.

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by hece View Post
    All shimano and Sram NX 11 speed cassettes use traditional 8/9/10 cassette body. Other Sram cassettes require Sram XD driver body.
    Cool, thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yalerider View Post
    As a newbie getting into the sport(I have an old Cannondale rigid but haven't ridden it much), I really appreciate the simplicity of 1x11. I am putting a dropper post lever on left side, hope I like the dropper post, should be easier getting on and off bike and maybe not so scary downhills.
    once you start using a dropper post you will wonder how you managed without one. Get a good one or maybe get two so when one needs servicing you always have a spare.

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    There's really no magic to 1x drivetrains BUT they are simpler and there is no crossover/redundancy of gearing.

    When the pie plates cogs and high tension derailleurs evolved, that was the turning point, with an 11-46, you can pretty much have you cake and eat it too. If I was carrying a load, I might go with a 1x, but in all reality I'd probably just run a smaller chainring. 26 x 46 is a stump puller.

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