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Thread: RV thread

  1. #1
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    RV thread

    WTF? The 50+ forum doesn't have an RV thread yet? I hope my entire life revolves around RV life when I retire...

    First I have to convince my wife, tho. Maybe we'll start with a smallish version, like those based on the Sprinter.

    Any current RVers care to post their thoughts?


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    *thread. Sheesh. For some reason Tapatalk won't let me edit the title.


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    RVs are goofy, you end up with a bunch of money tied up in a rapidly depreciating vehicle that has more upkeep costs than a small home, and you still have to pay to park the thing!

    I bought a short/low Dodge Promaster van, it's my daily driver, we're setting it up as a gear hauler, fan, sunroof, heater, portable fridge, convertible dinnette/bed.

    It replaced a truck and an Element, it gets 22/25, and with front wheel drive it's a snowmobile in the winter.

    I love being able to haul tons of gear, sleep wherever we want, it's super agile and it's really fun to drive.

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    ^^^ Yep. Those are some of the cons but there are pros too and I know some who have been very happy with RV ownership, and a few who have lived solely and happily in their RV for many years. I've also known a few with huge 6 figure motor coaches for whom the cost was not a significant consideration.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    RVs are goofy, you end up with a bunch of money tied up in a rapidly depreciating vehicle that has more upkeep costs than a small home, and you still have to pay to park the thing!

    I bought a short/low Dodge Promaster van, it's my daily driver, we're setting it up as a gear hauler, fan, sunroof, heater, portable fridge, convertible dinnette/bed.

    It replaced a truck and an Element, it gets 22/25, and with front wheel drive it's a snowmobile in the winter.

    I love being able to haul tons of gear, sleep wherever we want, it's super agile and it's really fun to drive.
    I did exactly the same. Love the Promaster.

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    I've thought about renting RVs but have heard horror stories about breakdowns. I think it would be better to buy used, get to know the vehicle inside and out and maintain it well.


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    I have a full size truck with a slide in camper. I think this is a versatile setup and it gives you pretty comfortable living quarters. We aren't into the RV park thing and having the truck allows us good dirt road capability.

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    I know a guy who retired at 50 and spent years traveling around the SW mostly dry camping in his large RV, riding and building trails where ever they wanted to be. This is what you're talking about? His house in Ca has been a rental for all these years, they eventually bought another house in northern Az and spent a few years there but I hear they're spending most of their time in the RV in Utah now. It can be done if you have your financials right and you and your SO are into the nomad lifestyle. Large RVs can be bought cheap, like-new used is the way to go. He had some serious health issues pop up that were a real hassle to deal with, something to consider as well.

    We're setting things up to hopefully take month long tours here and there then return to the home base. 3/4 ton truck & small 5th wheel is our thing right now but that might change before we pull the plug.
    bikes, guns, dogs....perfect

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    Screw the RV, they end up being an albatross around your neck.

    A Sprinter 4x4 with low range is the ticket. A simple shelf bed, portable kitchen and porta potti. That's my goal. When you aren't camping, you can carry enormous amounts of stuff. Even a short wheelbase Sprinter can carry 10' lumber and full 4x8 sheets of plywood inside and covered. You can't even do that with the stupid pickups these days, most of which have 5 or 6 foot beds.

    I'm sorry, but as the owner of an FCA vehicle, I'm wise to them, and I'm not dumping money into a Fiat van. You might save $10K on a Promaster initially, but you'll lose it in repairs and resale. That transmission is a tragedy.

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    I bought a tall lwb Ford Transit, set it up with water, cabinets, a removable bed (the bikes fit underneath) solar power and a refrig and galley. I can be fully self contained for the type of camping we like to do. I will be retired in October and my wife has 5 day weekends every other week. We are ready for long weekends and occasional multi week trips. We have taken it out a few times already and it suits us great...

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    Pretty sure the OP's "RV life" is being out for months on end. A basic DIY Sprinter conversion is going to be a big NO from the S/O for many of us. Mine requires the ability to get clean at the end of the day, a decent bed, and proper "facilities". Least I can provide for putting up with me.
    bikes, guns, dogs....perfect

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    I have a travel trailer and love it. At 30 ft long it has all the amenities and comforts -- shower, microwave, fridge, real bed, air conditioning, TV and DVD, et al. If you plan on extended trips -- weeks/months at a time -- you will want the amenities. In inclement weather you spend a lot of time inside and a van conversion or pickup camper gets old real fast.
    I have solar panels on the roof, so the batteries stay charged. 60 gal fresh water tank, 2-7gal propane tanks. The pickup tow vehicle carries the bikes, a canoe, and generator.
    Joining one of the various RV memberships gets the cost down. I am currently near Bend, OR, and I am in a full hookup site (water, electric, and sewer) for $27 total for the week. Leave it parked for the day while we go do fun stuff in the pickup.
    Retired, so no job commitments. We have spent more time in our trailer so far this year than time at home. Convert all your banking and bill paying to online and get a cell/wifi booster.

    Downside: gas mileage while towing is nonexistent. I have to stop every 150-180 miles for a fillup. Get a credit card with cash back for gas stations.
    You spend a lot more time in laundromats.

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    Yup our plan is to sell the houses and get a nice 35-38 foot coach. I'd like to pull an enclosed trailer with a small car and all of our toys, this would also give me the opportunity to have a garage and workshop to maintain everything. We still have some time to figure out the details though because I don't even turn 50 for another 3 weeks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post

    I'm sorry, but as the owner of an FCA vehicle, I'm wise to them, and I'm not dumping money into a Fiat van. You might save $10K on a Promaster initially, but you'll lose it in repairs and resale. That transmission is a tragedy.
    If you're getting a 4x4 Sprinter you're going to pay a lot more than $10k more than for a FWD Promaster, probably like $25k more. Funny, Promaster owners are always citing the high cost of maintaining a Sprinter as a reason they didn't go that direction. Many are former Sprinter owners. YMMV.

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    Quote Originally Posted by panchosdad View Post
    If you're getting a 4x4 Sprinter you're going to pay a lot more than $10k more than for a FWD Promaster, probably like $25k more. Funny, Promaster owners are always citing the high cost of maintaining a Sprinter as a reason they didn't go that direction. Many are former Sprinter owners. YMMV.
    4x4 is required, so the Sprinter or a Quigley or other conversion are the only options, but even if FWD would do it, neither a mini-van 6 speed auto nor a goofy single-disk automated manual are good ideas if you are actually going to carry a load. Do some internet research and you'll find that people who actually carry stuff with Promasters have transmission issues with either transmission. I think the Transit is a better idea if you don't need 4x4. Of course, you can get a Transit 4x4 as a conversion, but it won't be any cheaper than a 4x4 Sprinter.

    The resale on a Sprinter justifies the initial cost. It is crazy how well they hold their value.

    As for the RV thing, I guess if you can't deal with campgrounds, then seriously, you need to at least consider a 5th wheel or a trailer rather than an RV. Why would you want to be stuck in a campground without a way to get around? And if you tow a vehicle, the only advantage to an RV is the ability to wander around the back of the thing going down the road, right? Towing a vehicle is no more fun than towing a large trailer.

    RVs are notorious for being money pits. I've known a LOT of people here in CO who went the RV route and regretted the decision, in fact, I don't know a single person who didn't end up in a trailer or 5th wheel eventually if they continued to "camp". Do the math. A co-worker swore to me a Class A pusher was a better financial decision than hotel rooms at 100/night for he and his wife to go to craft shows around the southwest. He was spending 40-60 nights a year in the thing for about five years, and put about 15,000 miles on it each year. So after five years, that was 250 nights in a hotel - $25,000 he would save, right? After five years, he was so fed up - the RV left them stranded several times, the fuel costs (this was when diesel was $3-4 a gallon) killed them, the maintenance was outrageous, and the repair costs were crazy. He had an $11,000 transmission repair once. The thing ate tires and brakes. He had a $4000 bill for suspension repair. He needed to be towed several times, and those ranged from $600-1500. Every time it broke it was days or weeks before it could be fixed. He had to fly home a couple of times and go back and pick up the RV later. That was just the chassis. The interior was a stream of electrical shorts, broken plastic, and appliances flat out failing.

    He paid $105K for it and he got $35K when he sold it five years later. High mile, high use RVs have terrible resale. $70K in depreciation, plus $20K in repairs and maintenance, plus many unexpected nights in hotels/plane tickets, plus the fuel cost for 7-10MPG meant he could have bought a nice van and stayed in hotels for 250 nights at $100/night, eaten every meal in a restaurant, and come out way ahead, with less aggravation.

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    RV's look nice like a boat looks nice. I'm very cautious about that. Maybe stick my toe in some day with a smaller sized used something or other and move up from there if it is working out.

    For now, I have a deluxe canvas tent that is 10 x 14 with a 7 foot ceiling. I have a deluxe folding cot, a deluxe self inflating pad, and my old sleeping bag. I sleep extremely well on my cot. I've been in downpours, and stayed completely dry. Takes less than an hour to setup. Works well for camping near the trails, and I've got less than a grand invested in everything, including the cook stove and numerous other items that make camping enjoyable. I've got my wifi speaker in there connecting to my phone for music. Roughing it is not what I do.

    When I'm setup, I don't envy the people around me in their rv's.

    Here's my tent a couple months ago on a mountain biking trip.

    RV thread-tent.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by sisu View Post
    *thread. Sheesh. For some reason tapatalk won't let me edit the title.


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    fify.
    Try this: HTFU

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    I love the range of options here. Whatever floats your boat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by panchosdad View Post
    I love the range of options here. Whatever floats your boat.
    Go to a couple of RV shows and look around. Then you can get familiar with all the different types, floorplan, options,etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ladmo View Post
    RV's look nice like a boat looks nice. I'm very cautious about that. Maybe stick my toe in some day with a smaller sized used something or other and move up from there if it is working out.

    For now, I have a deluxe canvas tent that is 10 x 14 with a 7 foot ceiling. I have a deluxe folding cot, a deluxe self inflating pad, and my old sleeping bag. I sleep extremely well on my cot. I've been in downpours, and stayed completely dry. Takes less than an hour to setup. Works well for camping near the trails, and I've got less than a grand invested in everything, including the cook stove and numerous other items that make camping enjoyable. I've got my wifi speaker in there connecting to my phone for music. Roughing it is not what I do.

    When I'm setup, I don't envy the people around me in their rv's.

    Here's my tent a couple months ago on a mountain biking trip.

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    This ^^^^

    Our REI Base Camp 6 has logged more nights than we can count, approaching 100 at this point.

    I also once spent two weeks in our 6x12 enclosed utility trailer. It was mid-May at 7000 feet and it was below freezing at night, with snow one night, too. I camped at a state park that had electric hookups, and slept on a cot in the trailer with a little electric heater running when necessary.

    You can google up a lot of utility trailer camper conversions that are quite nice.

    I'll be the first to admit that camping in very hot/humid conditions without A/C is something you have to get used to. If you have an electric hookup, a big ass electric fan or one of those portable swamp coolers can help. If you don't have an electric hookup, there are battery powered fans called O2Cool that can save you.

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    We used to have an RV. Long story: we sold everything for a midlife crisis and bought a sailboat, spent 3.5 years on the boat, then came back to the real world. We bought a small used RV to get us and our stuff around the country to visit friends and family and and to live in while we figured out where we wanted to live.

    After the solid quality of the boat, the RV - lightweight for fuel mileage reasons - felt like a rickety piece of junk. (Well, okay, it was a cheap model.) But worse was that - before we bought the sailboat, we used to have a VW Westfalia Synchro. Not having 4WD and low clearance meant we couldn't just pull off onto forest service roads and hide out. We couldn't get to the interesting trailheads we used to love.

    We eventually decided to move back to Colorado, bought a house, sold the RV, and eventually sold the boat. At which point we bought a Sportsmobile. It's like the old Westfailure on steroids - it's a little longer, a little wider, and we can actually go highway speeds over highway passes. Plus it gets way better mileage than the RV ever did, and has high clearance, 4WD, and granny gear.

    RV thread-gooseberry.jpg

    No toilet, no shower - but we have a sunshower rig we use, and a set-up for wag bags. Some friends of ours installed a composting toilet in their van and we're thinking about that. I wouldn't want to live in it full-time for more than a month or two, but we're not looking to do that anyway.

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    A couple photos of the van. Built a rack that attaches to the door so you can still open the door with the bikes on.

    RV thread-img_0920.jpgRV thread-img_1146.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by panchosdad View Post
    If you're getting a 4x4 Sprinter you're going to pay a lot more than $10k more than for a FWD Promaster, probably like $25k more. Funny, Promaster owners are always citing the high cost of maintaining a Sprinter as a reason they didn't go that direction. Many are former Sprinter owners. YMMV.
    That would be moi

    MB started the big euro van trend in the US, but the europeans have been wise to these vans for decades.

    I had a Sprinter 118, it was a fine vehicle, but it had wimpy sheet metal (rust is a big problem with MB), also the rear wheel drive is ****e in slippery conditions.

    The Promaster (Fiat Ducato) is the second most popular big van in Europe, second to the Ford Transit. I love my Promaster, the diesel engine and auto manual tranny are amazing, but the fwd is darn near as good as awd, but half the cost. I use my van as a daily driver, for hauling, and for construction. It has great ground clearance, did the drive out to Gooseberry without a problem. I get 25mpg

    I know the OP was talking about extended stay RVing, but that lifestyle is very different from what most people do with their RVs.

    I like my house, there's nothing as fine as having a real bed, your bed, and a nice big shower with a rain can

    We take the van on trips, crash in ut when we don't wantbto fuss with a hotel, most of the time we eat out, get the occassional hotel to cool off and clean up.

    I greatly dislike campgrounds, dry camping is my intetest, and for that you just need shade, a bed, and food.

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    Quote Originally Posted by panchosdad View Post
    A couple photos of the van. Built a rack that attaches to the door so you can still open the door with the bikes on.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    You should drop that rear suspension, it'll reduce load height and smooth out the ride , send me a pm if interested in how to or check out the Promaster forum.

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    If I quit working I'd consider it, but right now I need the towing capacity.

  26. #26
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    My bike is my RV.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
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  27. #27
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    What kind of mileage do the ProMasters get?
    bikes, guns, dogs....perfect

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    Quote Originally Posted by azjeff View Post
    What kind of mileage do the ProMasters get?
    Mines a gas engine, 18-20. Diesels are more like 22-25 I think.

  29. #29
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    Travel trailer and my 3/4 ton Suburban work perfect for us. I do wish the 'burb was available with the Duramax though.
    One gear is all you need.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by azjeff View Post
    What kind of mileage do the ProMasters get?
    24-25mpg in my TD, 4k load rated, 5k tow rated, carries 4 x 8 sheets of plywood with room to spare, 74" interior width so you can sleep crossways, fwd works excellent in the snow, turn radius that puts a CJ to shame.

    There's just something so cool about going for a ride, and having your campsite ready no matter when and how you return. My wife often naps or reads while I ride, she loves the big van

    Best vehicle I've ever owned....and I've had a few.

    Edit: 27mpg on my last tank, just gets better with time, got 20k on odometer now.
    Last edited by Nurse Ben; 09-07-2016 at 09:31 PM.

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    This is my mountain bike race/ride home away from home. A 15' ParkLiner with full head, cooktop, A/C, furnace, etc. it's suitable for boondocking or full hookup cush.

  32. #32
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    I picked up a used class c and love it. Have not been staying at camp grounds but mostly boondocking where ever we can.
    I built a bike rack for the back so I can take along all 4 bikes and still pull my motorcycle trailer.
    RV thread-sdc11973.jpg

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    Pulled a small toy hauler (24ft)we bought new in 2007 all over the western states. It was an inexpensive Carson we paid $15k for and never had a single problem with it. We did dirt bike but used it more for biking. We dry camped and used parks and loved it. Being a smaller size we pretty much could go anywhere with it. My son raced a lot, all over CA, OR and Idaho for Nationals and the trailer was fantastic for it. Nothing better then staying right at or near the race for pre riding and hanging out.
    Sold it last Nov. to a coworker of my brother for $7k. Probably could have gotten more but we were happy. Plan is to buy a nicer all season travel trailer,again not a big one.

  34. #34
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    We love our pickup truck with a slide in camper. We don't camp in campgrounds and since we live in western Colorado we are close to lots of great camping and riding all over the southwest. It works great for us and I don't have pack up a wet tent.

  35. #35
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    We have a Chevy 6.6l duramax that carries either my 25 year old, recently refurbished, 4 wheel poptop camper or a camper shell. We use the shell when we tow our 1995 Kit Companion 20' travel trailer that I bought when I retired.

    We use the trailer for campground trips when we stay in only a few places for a week or so at a time like Waldo Lake in Oregon or Lassen Park. That way, we have a powerful and fuel efficient pickup with a shell to hide stuff that we can drive to trailheads, the grocery store, etc. I also park the trailer at the Mt. Shasta KOA in the spring for tele in the morning and mtb in the afternoon. Repeat for a month or so!

    We use the slide in pop top camper much more for road trips. In 25 years, I've spent over 3 years of nights in this camper skiing, paddling, and of course mountain biking. On the big 4wd truck, the poptop slide in can get many places that the sprinter, the promaster, etc will not ever get to, never mind return from. We'll park next to the guy driving the SportsMobile at the end of the road.

    If you're full timing, then by all means get a big coach or a big fifth wheel. Otherwise, your huge behemoth will be a nightmare on the road. Try parking one in any city in the US; try a restaurant parking lot, a shopping center, a busy gas station. Try camping in the backcounty or going to one of those more remote forest service campgrounds. Forget Chloride city or titus canyon or 95% of anza borrego state park.

    If you get a motor home, go small and go Mercedes diesel sprinter. Most van based and cheap coaches are a huge mass of poorly assembled 2 x 3's and particle board on an overstressed chassis. The inside will still look good when the engine and transmission wear out.

    A pickup and a trailer is a better option. Again, keep it smaller than the ones RV guy wants you to buy. A humpbacked fifth wheel is not a good option if your at all interested in real boondocking. I've watched one get stuck under a big limb on a big oak tree. That RV needed some serious roof work! I've also seen one stuck in the narrow end of a shopping center. Everything he did made it worse!

    Another advantage of a tow behind vs a fifth wheel is that you can put a shell on the truck. Then, you can carry your bikes, generator, etc without posting an armed guard 24 7.

    RV thread-img_0023.jpgRV thread-camper-fremont-cottonwood.jpgRV thread-img_0034.jpg

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    telemike- your exactly correct and I shared your same line of thought with many people over the years. Always go with the smallest TT you'll be comfortable in...The bigger the trailer the harder to get in and out of places. The small toy hauler I owned we pulled all over. I had ordered it with a beefier suspension and it went on several offroad camping trips. I pulled it with and still have our 4x4 P/U. I plan on a little bigger TT next as I don't see as many offroad trips in our future but whatever we buy it'll be under 30'.

  37. #37
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    Been camping most of my life, luckily my wife enjoys it just as much as I do. We started camping in the typical Coleman tent, got tired of having wet bedding/clothes during the monsoon rains here in AZ. Bought a 1966 Stevens M-416 military trailer, modded it to accommodate a RTT and a few other items...
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    Sold that and went to this...
    RV thread-22222img_4909.jpg

    and this year we purchased this baby for longer, further away trips...
    RV thread-2016-pcw.jpg
    Jim


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  38. #38
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    Wife and I will be renting a teardrop trailer in a little over a week for a mtb festival.

    We're taking that opportunity to get a feel for the options we'd want for our own, and have one custom built. We're renting from the actual builder, who's willing/able to do a LOT of custom work.

    We like keeping things small/simple, and the teardrop concept appeals to us. The trailer itself is mostly just a warm/dry place to sleep, and to carry the stuff that usually fills the Subaru. And that's really all we want at this point.

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    A place to nap and get out of the weather

    The Scamp 13, it was our favorite.

    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Wife and I will be renting a teardrop trailer in a little over a week for a mtb festival.

    We're taking that opportunity to get a feel for the options we'd want for our own, and have one custom built. We're renting from the actual builder, who's willing/able to do a LOT of custom work.

    We like keeping things small/simple, and the teardrop concept appeals to us. The trailer itself is mostly just a warm/dry place to sleep, and to carry the stuff that usually fills the Subaru. And that's really all we want at this point.

  40. #40
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    I've had either a truck n camper/truck n shell/truck n travel trailer my whole adult life until 4 years ago.
    Last rig was a truck and camper for 15 years.
    Then the Jeep and M101 trailer 1 year.
    Now the Jeep and tent trailer for the last 2 years, and also the Sprinter this past 6 months.

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    2015 Giant Stance 2 - 1 X 10 11/42 30T
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    This one is what the wife and I are renting and considering having built:

    Hiker Trailer -

    Our rental will be the 5x10. It's small enough I could even pull it behind my Honda Fit.

    Major reason we're looking at these is because of the two spots in the country the company builds 'em, one of them is right in town, so it's maybe a 30min drive to pick it up.

  42. #42
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    My wife wants to do a big month-long cross-country trip in an RV next summer. We have a 9 year old son, so there will be 3 of us. We don't own an RV and are still researching options.

    We were thinking of renting an RV, but the rental would be so expensive for a month that I was thinking I could buy a used RV, use it for the big trip and maybe a few other shorter trips, then I could sell it for close to what I paid for it and it might cost less than a rental. Plus, it would be a nicer RV with more amenities than a rental unit.

    A priority for my wife is having a comfortable place to hang out with the kid in the back of the RV while the other person drives, so this rules out travel trailers.

    I like the idea of something like a Class B that is easier to drive and park than a big RV, but most have the little combo toilet/shower and limited sleeping and hanging out space. I think the ideal for us would be something with an over-the-cab bunk plus a bed in the back, which generally puts us in a Class C RV. There are some Class B-Plus RVs that would probably be okay, but the Mercedes Sprinter chassis units are super expensive, and even the Ford and Dodge based ones are pretty pricey.

    I welcome any thoughts and advice.

  43. #43
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    I went back and forth on RV versus trailer and finally decided the best bet for us was a trailer. I can unhook my trailer use the Suburban for day trips. WAY easier than breaking camp. Some people like to tow a car behind their RV and that's an option, as well. Either way, you'll be relegated to trailering speeds in states where they're enforced.
    One gear is all you need.

  44. #44
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    Here's what my wife and I came up with. We've had a pop up trailer for 20 years while we were raising kids, and schlepped it all over the west. Now, since its just us and the dog, I wanted an easier setup and take down option. This i don't even have to unhook from the truck. Tow vehicle is a little underpowered but that will change in the next year or so when i upgrade my truck. We are very happy with it, after using it once. My son and I are taking it to Indio for Desert Trip next week since there are no motel rooms to be had. Its kind of small to be living out of for a long period of time, but we plan to spend a week or two at a time on the North Rim of the GC, Durango, and who knows where?
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    Great thread! I have been itching to change out my current 30' travel trailer. With the wife and kids I need really need a wet bath. After two years I have come to loath campgrounds and want to do more boondocks style stuff. I am currently liking the Littleguy T@b Max S Outback Edition. With the add on side tent/screen room I think it would work great for my needs.

    Anyone have experience with this one? Real reviews seems sparse on the Interweb.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G890A using Tapatalk

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    I had a 27' trailer with a pop out that I pulled behind my 25' crew cab Duramax. It was great for a trip to Yellowstone but I sold it shortly afterwards because is was just too long for the good (non-hookup) camping spots around here.

    If I were to do a trailer again I would definitely get a Toy hauler even though I am not into motor sports. A toy hauler would be a whole lot less work carting bikes, kayaks, sups etc. Most toy haulers have a generator or a generator compartment for dry camping. Most trailers I have seen do not. The toy haulers with dual drop down queen beds look like a great option. Lots of sleeping room, one of the queens becomes sofa during the day and tons of cargo room while moving! I also really like having our bikes and stuff inside instead of flapping in the wind and getting encrusted with road grime during nasty weather or caked with dust during the summer.

    I have been looking at slide in campers for my Duramax which has an 8' bed. I think I am going to prefer a camper to a trailer for the type of camping we like to do. I figure I will pull a utility trailer setup for toys (Bicycles, Kayaks, paddleboards, etc.). I might have to figure out some type of hitch mount platform bike carrier for day trips. I think this setup will also work nice for XC ski day trips... warm dry change of clothes and hot chocolate!

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabrabu View Post
    My wife wants to do a big month-long cross-country trip in an RV next summer. We have a 9 year old son, so there will be 3 of us. We don't own an RV and are still researching options.

    We were thinking of renting an RV, but the rental would be so expensive for a month that I was thinking I could buy a used RV, use it for the big trip and maybe a few other shorter trips, then I could sell it for close to what I paid for it and it might cost less than a rental. Plus, it would be a nicer RV with more amenities than a rental unit.

    A priority for my wife is having a comfortable place to hang out with the kid in the back of the RV while the other person drives, so this rules out travel trailers.

    I like the idea of something like a Class B that is easier to drive and park than a big RV, but most have the little combo toilet/shower and limited sleeping and hanging out space. I think the ideal for us would be something with an over-the-cab bunk plus a bed in the back, which generally puts us in a Class C RV. There are some Class B-Plus RVs that would probably be okay, but the Mercedes Sprinter chassis units are super expensive, and even the Ford and Dodge based ones are pretty pricey.

    I welcome any thoughts and advice.
    A month is not as long as you think. Between the hassle of finding, buying, maintaining, and storing an RV, there is the reality that your wife will ultimately want to stay in hotels at least a few times a week.

    Also, one month of staying places, not a month of driving, so there will be a lot more parked time to enjoy a homey trailer. You should not be up and moving around in an RV while it's on the road, not safe, esp in an RV which have terrible crash protection.

    If you have a small truck or minivan, that would be plenty for towing a small trailer, which is all you need for a family of three. A Scamp or similar, get one used, keep it until you have the need more trailer or until you get tired of looking at it sit unused.

    The money you save in gas, maintenance, and headaches can be spent on hotel rooms, fine dining, and spa treatments for your wife.

    My wife agrees with the above statement

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    A month is not as long as you think. Between the hassle of finding, buying, maintaining, and storing an RV, there is the reality that your wife will ultimately want to stay in hotels at least a few times a week.

    Also, one month of staying places, not a month of driving, so there will be a lot more parked time to enjoy a homey trailer. You should not be up and moving around in an RV while it's on the road, not safe, esp in an RV which have terrible crash protection.

    If you have a small truck or minivan, that would be plenty for towing a small trailer, which is all you need for a family of three. A Scamp or similar, get one used, keep it until you have the need more trailer or until you get tired of looking at it sit unused.

    The money you save in gas, maintenance, and headaches can be spent on hotel rooms, fine dining, and spa treatments for your wife.

    My wife agrees with the above statement
    My wife is actually the one who is pushing the RV thing. I would prefer to drive our minivan and stay in hotels since an RV would be a hassle to maneuver and park, and may not even be allowed on certain national park roads. In her mind, the big advantage is being able to hang out in the back during the driving and use a computer, watch movies, play games with our son, take a nap, etc. For her, it's more about the comfort during the driving than the camping/sleeping. This rules out the travel trailer option.

  49. #49
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    My wife wants me to build one of these:


    https://books.google.com/books?id=BC...page&q&f=false

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    Quote Originally Posted by andytiedye View Post
    My wife wants me to build one of these:


    https://books.google.com/books?id=BC...page&q&f=false


    That's pretty funny. You see all kinds if homebuilt campers in Moab. My favorites look like tiny houses built in the back of pickup beds.

    I'd prefer being a little more under the radar, like the cargo van that looks like a cargo van on the outside, but which is fully decked out on the inside.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabrabu View Post
    My wife is actually the one who is pushing the RV thing. I would prefer to drive our minivan and stay in hotels since an RV would be a hassle to maneuver and park, and may not even be allowed on certain national park roads. In her mind, the big advantage is being able to hang out in the back during the driving and use a computer, watch movies, play games with our son, take a nap, etc. For her, it's more about the comfort during the driving than the camping/sleeping. This rules out the travel trailer option.
    Maybe you could set up a van conversion as your tow vehicle? It would be easy enough to set the back up comfortable for your wife and kids and get the towing package to handle a travel trailer too...

  52. #52
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    We've done two cross-country trips in an Astro van with a Coleman tent trailer. My wife and I and our two sons did one in '98 and another one in '01. These are the memories that last a lifetime. My sons are now 26 and 28 and still talk about the things we did on those two trips. We planned an approximate route and then gave them an atlas and a National Parks guide and said that virtually everything along the route was fair game.

    When they returned to school at summer's end, they had some great stories for "What I did on my summer vacation". In fact, we got a call from my youngest son's teacher, she was concerned about him exaggerating his summer activities.

    Great times and great memories!
    One gear is all you need.

  53. #53
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    Been full timing in a 40 foot motorhome for 4 years now. Love the lifestyle. I carry a hardtail, FS, cross and road bike off the back. We get to ride in some great places and there are so many more on the list. I love Tsali in the Fall, Moab in the Spring, CB in the Summer, and currently in So Cal. We have met many full timers. Mostly older and retired, but some younger families with kids. Not a lot of serious bikers. Happy hour starts pretty early in the RV world. Depreciating asset? Of course. Life is a depreciating asset. I dont know why so many people focus so hard on that.

    Now heading out to do wind sprints in San Diego.

  54. #54
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    After many, many years of tent / bivy bag camping I have persuaded the better half we should get off of the ground. So we went with this, which was ok for dry nights.RV thread-tent-truck.jpg
    After a very wet holidays to the Yukon this past August she went and bought something bigger. We have a choice of trucks to pull it with so now we can camp in the Canadian Rockies in comfort.
    RV thread-black-rock.jpg

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake21 View Post
    Been full timing in a 40 foot motorhome for 4 years now. Love the lifestyle. I carry a hardtail, FS, cross and road bike off the back. We get to ride in some great places and there are so many more on the list. I love Tsali in the Fall, Moab in the Spring, CB in the Summer, and currently in So Cal. We have met many full timers. Mostly older and retired, but some younger families with kids. Not a lot of serious bikers. Happy hour starts pretty early in the RV world. Depreciating asset? Of course. Life is a depreciating asset. I dont know why so many people focus so hard on that.

    Now heading out to do wind sprints in San Diego.
    Biggest detractor to that full time RV lifestyle is work. Gotta have income that is compatible with a mobile lifestyle.

    I am getting into mtb coaching and guiding, which is compatible. My minor 2nd income source of cartography can also be handled out of an rv to a degree (but the power needs of the robust computing power that requires are no joke). But my wife is a veterinarian, which requires state licenses and such. Her job, not so much. Lots of other people have incompatible income sources.

    Doing the RV thing full time after retirement is definitely attractive, though.

  56. #56
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    If you are going to full time after retirement, better start binge drinking now just to prepare. These old farts out here make my college partying days look like kindergarten.


    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Biggest detractor to that full time RV lifestyle is work. Gotta have income that is compatible with a mobile lifestyle.

    I am getting into mtb coaching and guiding, which is compatible. My minor 2nd income source of cartography can also be handled out of an rv to a degree (but the power needs of the robust computing power that requires are no joke). But my wife is a veterinarian, which requires state licenses and such. Her job, not so much. Lots of other people have incompatible income sources.

    Doing the RV thing full time after retirement is definitely attractive, though.

  57. #57
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    Maybe not full time but very much interested in several weeks/months per year. Retired earlier this year and working a fun (bike job) a couple days a week. Pension is solid and will hold us fine, especially once my youngest heads to college in June. Been looking at trailers a long while, we had a toy hauler for 8 yrs and used it for biking. I have so many areas on my list, can't wait!

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake21 View Post
    If you are going to full time after retirement, better start binge drinking now just to prepare. These old farts out here make my college partying days look like kindergarten.
    I have some friends who RV part time (big mtb destinations and LOTS of beer destinations) and they definitely resemble that statement. They are approaching retirement and I think they do want to full time when they get there.

    One thing I have learned from hanging out with them is to look like I am drinking hard without actually drinking that hard. Fake it till you make it, right?

  59. #59
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    New Set Up

    Hitting the roads in our new set up. Well worth the expense for the added comfort and convenience as compared to the tent.
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    Sweet set up R3D4!

    Been focused on a ORV Timber Ridge trailer for a couple years now. I like how they are put together. Not sure we will stay in our home or sell and move elsewhere now that we are technically retired. We do really enjoy RVing and we have the time. I figure we could move our home base and save quite a bit and we'd have the RV to escape whenever we like.
    Last edited by MTB Dad; 01-07-2017 at 12:36 PM.

  61. #61
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    I can't get away with RV life or van life yet. So I'm going with Roof Top Tent life and get my butt off the ground.

    Got a Tacoma and had a custom rack built to accommodate the tent and the bikes on the tailgate.RV thread-pb080012.jpg

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    I just don't get the roof top tent appeal. How is it different from just a tent on the ground? Isn't a pain to have to breakdown every time you want to move the truck? Wouldn't just leaving the tent as a basecamp be simpler?

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    Quote Originally Posted by panchosdad View Post
    I just don't get the roof top tent appeal. How is it different from just a tent on the ground? Isn't a pain to have to breakdown every time you want to move the truck? Wouldn't just leaving the tent as a basecamp be simpler?
    i have always agreed with this. when i camp near my truck, i use a big 6 person tent wtih a cot in it. super comfy, and i can stand up to pull on my hunting pants.
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  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boomchakabowwow View Post
    i have always agreed with this. when i camp near my truck, i use a big 6 person tent wtih a cot in it. super comfy, and i can stand up to pull on my hunting pants.
    I have a similar campsite setup. Large canvas tent, deluxe cot, plenty of room even for my recliner lounger if I want to bring it in. Add in my wireless speaker playing music from my phone and there is nothing about this picture that resembles roughing it. I bring my bike inside over night for piece of mind and still plenty of room left over. No crawling around or getting dressed laying down.

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    Quote Originally Posted by panchosdad View Post
    I just don't get the roof top tent appeal. How is it different from just a tent on the ground? Isn't a pain to have to breakdown every time you want to move the truck? Wouldn't just leaving the tent as a basecamp be simpler?
    The way I understand them, they're popular in the overlander crowd. Where you're likely to be moving camp fairly regularly. At least the ones I've seen vids of, they look a little less complicated than freestanding tents to setup/takedown. They also look to be nice for adding capacity to a teardrop type trailer. Speaking of which, putting a RTT on a burly teardrop or otherwise offroad trailer gets you an overland setup you can detach from your Jeep/truck.

    RV thread-ecb43d9eab855ddc7ed4ffdcc973a4cc.jpg




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    Better get some jackstands under that first rig, otherwise they're gonna get a suprise!

    Rooftop rigs are just tents, I'd sooner have a tow behind.

    Vans are da bomb!

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Better get some jackstands under that first rig, otherwise they're gonna get a suprise!

    Rooftop rigs are just tents, I'd sooner have a tow behind.

    Vans are da bomb!
    Most of the non offroad teardrops do not come with jack stands. Mine will not, but I will be getting some leveling stands separately in case I wind up with a campsite on a slope somewhere. One of my favorite local parks has some sites with pretty steep grades. They can cause some problems for people with long travel trailers.

    I suspect the pic I shared is just a marketing shot.

  68. #68
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    Great thread. I am inching toward retirement and am considering lots of options. I currently have a Eurovan Weekender Westfalia (& formerly owned an '84 Westy full camper). It is an awesome rig and being able to set-up or take down the top in under a minute without stepping outside is pretty killer. Downside is low clearance, FWD and lousy winter performance, plus lack of kitchen facilities. So in winter it goes in the garage and a 1st gen. Tacoma takes over for our salt-encrusted roads.

    One of those microtrailers is super appealing for extended trips. Thanks for that link, Nate. However trailers can be a PITA and I really like the simplicity of one self-contained rig. Previously rented Cruise America campers (25' length on a Ford E350 chassis) on some family trips but the kids are grown up and only need to accommodate 2 adults and bikes. A front receiver hitch gives options for bike hauling and ideally a small dual sport moto would be pretty handy.

    A smaller 4x4 Sprinter has a lot of appeal but i can appreciate the maintenance and repair cost issues. Sportsmobiles are a solid option too. Nice to have so many sweet options (1st world problems),
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    I responded previously about our trips with a pop up, but never updated with our current set up.

    In August of '14 we picked up a near pristine '09 24' Cougar. I've already towed it to Moab and to Oregon and we use it for weekend excursions more locally. So far, it's been trouble free and we love it!
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  70. #70
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    Let's talk van conversions and campers. A tow behind is out of the question for us as we tow a flatbed rafting trailer. We haven't started looking yet, just in the dreaming/beginning research stages.
    Vans - Sportsmobile, Sprinter, Promaster, travato.... what's the big deal with Sprinter? I hear that these names a lot.
    Pre built or build your own?
    4x4 or not?

    Campers... How do ya'll like the low profiel ones that pop up?

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    Let's talk van conversions and campers. A tow behind is out of the question for us as we tow a flatbed rafting trailer. We haven't started looking yet, just in the dreaming/beginning research stages.
    Vans - Sportsmobile, Sprinter, Promaster, travato.... what's the big deal with Sprinter? I hear that these names a lot.
    Pre built or build your own?
    4x4 or not?

    Campers... How do ya'll like the low profiel ones that pop up?




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  72. #72
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    doh, maybe that's the thread I couldn't find earlier, thanks. I had no idea until today that there was a car forum.

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    Pros and cons to each position here when you start talking about RV's, tents, slide ins, etc. Biggest thing, I think you have to sort out first is what kind of camping do you want to do? Then how many people, bikes, etc. Of course there is also the budget. We have gone the RV route for the past 30 years: tents (not an RV), tent trailer, slide in, travel trailer, 5th wheel (4X) and now a class C motorhome. We do not like RV parks, crowded areas on concrete, and prefer boon docking on BLM lands to national forests. Biggest problem we encountered with BLM and NF campsites is what size RV you can fit in it. Most of these sites, 25 or 26 feet is about the max. with out 24 foot Mercedes Sprinter MH, piece of cake. Just have to have somewhat decent road to get in and out. I have seen lot of people lately taking the Sprinter van and making conversions on them for camping. Some have been pretty slick and others, well.....The smaller class C's are easy to drive, gets around town and food center parking lots with with ease, as compared to TT's or 5th wheels. Like buying a really nice bike, you need to sort through priorities and affordability. None of these options discussed are a bad idea.

  74. #74
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    Formica, We have had two different Pop Up Campers and loved them both, our last one is this picture. It is an 8' model and is really very spacious. Ours had an outside shower with hot water but no bathroom. This model is about 1400# which was not a problem for our truck but could be a consideration for a smaller truck. It has a cooktop, propane fridge, heater, queen size bed and plenty of storage.

    Our style of camping is never in an RV Park, sometimes in a FS campground, but mostly off a dirt road in the forest. The Pop Up works perfectly for this as it is small and light enough for extensive dirt road driving.

    If you already have a truck capable of holding a camper I would suggest looking into this option. If you are starting from scratch maybe a van conversion makes sense. For my lifestyle a truck is mandatory so a slide in camper works well for us.RV thread-pop-up.jpg

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    thanks

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    Let's talk van conversions and campers. A tow behind is out of the question for us as we tow a flatbed rafting trailer. We haven't started looking yet, just in the dreaming/beginning research stages.
    Vans - Sportsmobile, Sprinter, Promaster, travato.... what's the big deal with Sprinter? I hear that these names a lot.
    Pre built or build your own?
    4x4 or not?

    Campers... How do ya'll like the low profiel ones that pop up?
    The Pro master is amazing, fwd with all terrain tires and you're good for all but the serious off road excursions. I've got 40k on mine, been out and back to Gooseberry and never scraped a rock.

    The Sprinter 4 x 4 is quite capable "for a big arse unibody van", but it's not an off road excursion vehicle by any stretch. It's also a large van, only available as a long wheelbase tall.

    It's important to decide on must haves, want to haves, and don't really need.

    Very few people "Boony bash" in their very expensive RV, so buying AWD might fall under the don't really need column. AWD costs more up front, mpg suffers, and it costs more to maintain.

    I live in the central Cascades, drive on ice and snow four months out of the year, drive up to the ski resort multiple times a week, drive up into the Methow, etc... and I don't have studs or chain.

    FWD is the ticket. Diesel, averaging 25mpg, can get as much as 28mpg if I keep my foot out of the floor

  77. #77
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    thx that is what I'm looking for

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    I am not 50 yet (1 month from 43), but I did just get an RV to use as basecamp for Mtn biking rides, 24 hr races, XC races and general camping.


    I had two requirements. 1) Towable with my existing car 2) fit in my garage. My Aliner checks off both.

    Box is 12feet long, 15ft with tongue, 1750lbs dry, Has water/heat, 3 way fridge, A/C, outside shower. rear sofa converts to bed and front dinette that turns to bed.

    I considered a driveable RV (like van or truck camper) and the issue that if use the RV as "basecamp" I have to move camp every time I drive to a TH. Last year I used campground just outside Durango as base and drove each day to different TH's. With this set-up I can unhook and drive vs taking the RV every time. Of course a trailer is harder to maneuver in places.



    Here is my first trip pictures. I used a NF Campground, but will also use dispersed camping when possible. I do have some RV park trip booked mostly because wanted to "work" from the RV using internet and bridging a longer trip.

    Joe's Biking Adventures and other Ramblings







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    '12 Santa Cruz Highball 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5",Vassago Verhauen SS 29" XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

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    [QUOTE=JoePAz;13182983]I am not 50 yet (1 month from 43), but I did just get an RV to use as basecamp for Mtn biking rides, 24 hr races, XC races and general camping.


    I had two requirements. 1) Towable with my existing car 2) fit in my garage. My Aliner checks off both.

    Box is 12feet long, 15ft with tongue, 1750lbs dry, Has water/heat, 3 way fridge, A/C, outside shower. rear sofa converts to bed and front dinette that turns to bed.

    I considered a driveable RV (like van or truck camper) and the issue that if use the RV as "basecamp" I have to move camp every time I drive to a TH. Last year I used campground just outside Durango as base and drove each day to different TH's. With this set-up I can unhook and drive vs taking the RV every time. Of course a trailer is harder to maneuver in places.


    I'm thinking about a pop-up, but one of the concerns I have about the tent sided option is that it doesn't offer any sound blocking advantage over a tent. I hate having noisy neighbors in camp but it happens. Hos does the A-liner do in this respect? I'd imagine it's quieter than a tent camper, not as quiet as a travel trailer? Thanks...

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveF View Post
    I'm thinking about a pop-up, but one of the concerns I have about the tent sided option is that it doesn't offer any sound blocking advantage over a tent. I hate having noisy neighbors in camp but it happens. Hos does the A-liner do in this respect? I'd imagine it's quieter than a tent camper, not as quiet as a travel trailer? Thanks...
    Well the soft dormers at a tent so no sound proofing at all. However I don't have raise them up. Most models don't come with them anyway. I chose them for added space and a more open feel. Some models have hardside dormers. These use hard walls just like the rest of the Aframe. Those don't have the same open fee, but should do better on sound reduction. Really everything is a compromise so you just have to decide what is more critical for you.
    Joe
    '12 Santa Cruz Highball 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5",Vassago Verhauen SS 29" XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    Well the soft dormers at a tent so no sound proofing at all. However I don't have raise them up. Most models don't come with them anyway. I chose them for added space and a more open feel. Some models have hardside dormers. These use hard walls just like the rest of the Aframe. Those don't have the same open fee, but should do better on sound reduction. Really everything is a compromise so you just have to decide what is more critical for you.
    Ah, I don't know why I assumed the dormers were knock-down panels-soft panels there would make at least as much sense. Thanks for the feedback, and enjoy your camper! I'm still not sure what way I'll go but I'm not in a huge hurry...

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    RV = Repair Vehicle. That said we spend 3 or 4 months a year in our Class C Motorhome.

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    We had a pop up, they are a serious pain in the backside, it takes time and effort to put one up and take one down, try doing that in a rain or wind storm and it's really exciting! Popups y are the most breathable system, but they also got hotter and colder than an enclosed camper/van.

    Folding campers in general are prone to problems, the A Liner is no exception, just think about the moving parts, stress, and the idea that the assembly is bouncing down the highway at 70 mph for hours on end, any joint or fastener will fatigure, plumbing and electrical will fail, them RV's are not that durable.

    We had the most enjoyment out of a Scamp 13', lightweight, easy to maneuver, ready to use, just open the door, not heavy, not expensive, weather proof.

    I drive a Promaster van that I've converted for sleeping, it's not an RV as I use it as a daily driver and for hauling building materials, dogs, etc... I love my van, but it would be nice to have a camper we can park and come back too, but at this point the van serves my needs.

    As to all those extras: shower, AC, water, heat... I think you need to pay attention to what you really need. We never cook in our campers, it's too hot and it makes them smell. We never stay places where there isn't a shower or a lake/river to use for bathing. 3 way fridges are fine, but the pilots often blow out and 110 is rarely available unless you're in a developed park.

    Reality is this: You will cook/eat out side if you don't go out to eat. You will not shower often, face it, mountain bikers are grubby. For keeping things cool a 12v fridge or icebox is ideal. In terms of heat, nothing works as well as a sleeping bag or a nice down blanket. If it's that cold and nasty, odds are you will be at home or in a hotel. Water, propane, and electrical systems are a weak link, they fail, they get gunky due to non use, and they require maintenance.

    A fiberglass egg with a nice full or queen sized bed, 12v fridge, propane heater if you must, storage for gear. Skip the water system, toilet, and cooking. Get a port-a-pot, some water jugs, a folding table and chairs, and a coleman stove. Spend your money on a solar system and a good 12v battery set up.

    If you must have 110, buy a really quiet, high end generator, use it to run AC if you dry camp in hot places and to charge the batteries. YOU DO NOT NEED A MICROWAVE!

    Here's my top choice for a new lightweight camper: The 17 Foot Escape

    The idea behind fiberglass is durability, fixability, insulation, and lightweight. The Scamp has a composite wood floor bonded into a two piece fiberglass shell, not ideal. Casita is about the same, but the bottom is fiberglass shell wraps the composite floor.

    There are a few others out there worth considering, I can't remember names, but it's worth going on the Fiberglass RV forum for ideas.

    Stay away from aluminum and composites, the aluminum is cold and damp, the composites are rattletraps and rot/fall apart. The fiberglass "eggs" last forever and are re-buildable.



    [QUOTE=JoePAz;13182983]I am not 50 yet (1 month from 43), but I did just get an RV to use as basecamp for Mtn biking rides, 24 hr races, XC races and general camping.


    I had two requirements. 1) Towable with my existing car 2) fit in my garage. My Aliner checks off both.

    Box is 12feet long, 15ft with tongue, 1750lbs dry, Has water/heat, 3 way fridge, A/C, outside shower. rear sofa converts to bed and front dinette that turns to bed.

    I considered a driveable RV (like van or truck camper) and the issue that if use the RV as "basecamp" I have to move camp every time I drive to a TH. Last year I used campground just outside Durango as base and drove each day to different TH's. With this set [QUOTE=SteveF;13183991]

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post

    Stay away from aluminum and composites, the aluminum is cold and damp
    You mean on of these? I have no idea how people can afford them (or the bigger units). I like the concept of the Basecamp, bike washing station too.
    BBB (big beautiful bike)

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by temporoad View Post
    You mean on of these? I have no idea how people can afford them (or the bigger units). I like the concept of the Basecamp, bike washing station too.
    That Basecamp is obscenely expensive for its size. It def caters to the high end market.

    Why I went with a camper that has a wood/alu exterior cladding. Much less expensive. Yeah, the insulating properties could be better. But it is small enough that it doesn't take much to warm the interior. And it stays surprisingly cool even on 90F+ days.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  86. #86
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    Haha, must have some sort of shower capabilty. Nurse Ben, good post - thank you.

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    Solar showers work nice

    Sent from my SM-P900 using Tapatalk

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    Camping trailers are ridiculously over priced, especially the "boutique" ones. That nice fiberglass one Nurse Ben linked to STARTS at $25K and it doesn't have A/C or other stuff that would put it close to $30K by the time it had what I wanted.

    Unfortunately, lower end trailers are pretty cheaply built. But, they are functional. Jayco makes a 3000lb (sticker weight) fully-self contained trailer with a tub/shower/toilet, A/C, microwave, ect., and you can get it factory lifted. They run about $13K.

    Google "Jayco Jay Flight SLX 145RB Baja". They are hard to find, but I'm pretty sure that is the least expensive fully self contained rig out there, and you can get it into some tighter places.

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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    Camping trailers are ridiculously over priced, especially the "boutique" ones.
    Why I bought what I did. Nice feature set and within my reach. No bathroom inside, but I don't need that anyway.


    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by andytiedye View Post
    solar showers work nice when the sun is shining
    fify

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    Wow, that unit that Ben posted is pricey! Generally speaking a nice travel trailer, at the end of a model year can be had for $1K per foot; i.e, a 20 foot trailer should be $20K new, or less. Lower end models with fewer features can be had for much less.

    Finding a used trailer in good condition is generally where the bargains lie. Our Cougar was five years old when we bought it and it still had the stickers in the sink and shower from new. It still smelled new. We picked it up for $16K while it booked at over $20K.

    I'll almost always let someone else take the depreciation hit.
    One gear is all you need.

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    @chuckha62- agree 100% good used trailers are out there as often people buy and for whatever reason decide it's not what they thought and sell cheap....

    I bought a small brand new (21') Carson toy hauler years ago for under 20k, served my family fantastically for 9 years. Not top quality but it held up fine for a family of 4 and having a full bath, full kitchen, A/C and heater

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    This just happened...

    2018 Travato.

    The custom conversion thing was starting to give me a headache. Too many options: which builder, which van, which configuration, how long do you want to wait.....This ticks off most of the boxes and is turnkey.

    21'
    Bed is big when converted
    shower/bath (non negotiable item for hub)
    2 burner galley w/propane-electric stove
    solar
    awning
    non-hitch bike rack (we tow a raft at times)
    FWD

    other goodies I'm usre.

    What's not to love? An eclipse getaway will be the shakedown.

    RV thread-img_20170812_135058_101.jpg
    Last edited by formica; 08-14-2017 at 11:11 AM.

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    Really cool!
    I probably have 2 more years of planning, but I hope a class B is in our future,
    Craig, Durango CO
    "Lighten up PAL" ... King Cage

  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    2018 Travato.

    What's not to love? An eclipse getaway will be the shakedown.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_20170812_135058_101.jpg 
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    What's not to love? $100k+ price tag.

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    Planning, saving, budgeting... nothing wrong with that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    Planning, saving, budgeting... nothing wrong with that.
    Exactly. Just made a similar move to a Class A diesel pusher 40 foot RV.

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    Quote Originally Posted by temporoad View Post
    You mean on of these? I have no idea how people can afford them (or the bigger units). I like the concept of the Basecamp, bike washing station too.
    Not an Airstream, I was talking about aluminum pop ups. Airstreams are pricey.

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    2018 Travato.

    The custom conversion thing was starting to give me a headache. Too many options: which builder, which van, which configuration, how long do you want to wait.....This ticks off most of the boxes and is turnkey.

    21'
    Bed is big when converted
    shower/bath (non negotiable item for hub)
    2 burner galley w/propane-electric stove
    solar
    awning
    non-hitch bike rack (we tow a raft at times)
    FWD

    other goodies I'm usre.

    What's not to love? An eclipse getaway will be the shakedown.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_20170812_135058_101.jpg 
Views:	74 
Size:	157.5 KB 
ID:	1152072
    Good choice, the Promaster is the best base vehicle for an RV build.

    I assume you got diesel.

    I love my Promaster, it's my everyday driver, hauls my dogs and gear, great for carrying construction materials, can pull a trailer if needed, averages 24mpg if I drive "normal".

  100. #100
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    Congrats on the new rig, Formica!
    One gear is all you need.

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