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  1. #1
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    New question here. Retirement, Where when??

    I am 62 avid cyclist,Road and mountain.Want to retire somewhere where I can do both and hang out with like minded.Have been looking at retirement communities,not old folk homes,but places like saddlebrooke in Arizona.Plan on visiting Bend Oregon,Boise Idaho,St George Utah and others.Open to suggestions.Dont like humidty.That sort of rules out Florida.I think Georgia has some biking north of Atlanta.What are all you old guys thinking?

  2. #2
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    Where? I enjoy mountain biking and skiing. Not a fan of big cities I've been looking at some small towns in western Colorado that will give me access to each.

    When? I'm 52. I'd like to be out there by the time I'm 60. Even if I'm not retired. I hope to be able to work part-time from home by then.

    That's the plan, anyway. It's good to have goals.

  3. #3
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    Idyllwild, CA(4600ft) has 40+ miles combined network of trails you can ride straight out of your front door, 300 days out of the year. Idyllwild has homes, starting at $25k to $450k. The riding locals consists of a 69-year-old singlespeeder, 86-year-old trail rider, a few CAT1 XC pros, a World-Class marathon racer and a bunch of bikepackers, mixed with a few trail enthusiasts. Two excellent bike shops are up there, who can do everything from fork, shock and suspension service....to alloy frame repair.

    For a retired biker - Idyllwild is literally a Country Club: with top dining establishments, hiking, nearby lakes.....all in a Alpine environment.
    Last edited by Cayenne_Pepa; 09-17-2015 at 05:31 PM.
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  4. #4
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    Where I live one can do anything from a rails to trails to stuff that requires a six inch bike with body armor. Not to mention we have skiing. But really, where you plan to live should have the consideration of factors that don't just include biking.

  5. #5
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    55 years young and retired and living in Heber Utah. The wife and I moved here 5+ years ago from Park City. We got tired of our taxes being way to high and the have to have something going on in PC 52 weeks out of the year to keep the dirt pimps and merchants happy. Our taxes are 1/3 of what they were in PC and that was one of the things we looked at with both of us being in our fifties and looking at ways to reduce our overhead. We have hundreds of miles of trails in PC and Heber Valley and when the snow flies we are 20 minutes to PCMR or PCM if you drink the kool-aid. Heber is at 5500' feet so the winters are not quite as harsh as what we used to see in PC which is at 7000'and then again there has not been a real winter here in 5 years.
    Such a long long time to be gone, such a short time to be.

  6. #6
    oh my TVC 15
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    My aunt and uncle love Bend, my wife likes Boise and I'm thinking about Laramie.
    The most expensive bike in the world is still cheaper than the cheapest open heart surgery.

  7. #7
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    There are so many factors to retirement, family, cost of living, weather, etc. etc. I like biking but that would have to somewhat down on the list of things that are a factor.

    You mentioned North Georgia, let me tell you it is HOT and humid in the summer pretty much everywhere in the south. I used to work in Ringold, GA.

  8. #8
    fog
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    Laramie, really. You must like cold and wind.
    I grew up there and I am very happy to not living there anymore.
    I am retired and live in Lakewood, CO. Lots of riding in the area. Best place to retire, I do not know; but my wife is a native of Denver, so I had no choice.
    Good luck in your retirement.
    Wayne

  9. #9
    Meatbomb
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    My retirement is not going to be decided on mountain biking. I'm buying a sail boat and heading to the Caribbean.

  10. #10
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    After retiring I found out Tucson is building a 130 mile loop around town The Loop - Pima County

    Summers are brutal here, so ride early in the mornings.

  11. #11
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    Don't like the humidity of Florida, but are thinking of moving closer to Kentucky? You're doing it wrong.

    Move west, young man. Like, at least two hundred miles west of the Mississippi.

    Here's a map to help you find areas void of water. Whatever you do, avoid anything near the Gulf of Google.

    Retirement, Where when??-us.jpg
    I will suffer no butt-hurt fools!

  12. #12
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    Age 59 and retiring to Prescott AZ in one year from Nome AK. Being near family is the main consideration in the choice of Prescott, but really looking forward to nearby cycling opportunities: Sedona, Flag, PHX, BCT. Prescott itself seems to have embraced mtb with new trails going in every year. If not for family, I would probably be looking at Silver City NM. Can't wait. I ride my fatbike year round up here in AK, but I miss riding real singletrack. Looking forward to buying a couple of new bikes, too. Woot!
    Vini vidi velo!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by fog View Post
    Laramie, really. You must like cold and wind.
    I grew up there and I am very happy to not living there anymore.
    I am retired and live in Lakewood, CO. Lots of riding in the area. Best place to retire, I do not know; but my wife is a native of Denver, so I had no choice.
    Good luck in your retirement.
    Wayne
    I couldn't agree with you more about Laramie. One of the coldest windiest places in the U.S. I have a part time airport shuttle gig I do once a week. I've been doing it for a couple of years now. Every shift that I work I'have to drive from Fort Collins to Cheyenne and over to Laramie via I-80. Sometimes twice in a shift. One miserable place that area is. It's very common to have 60 mph winds in blizzard white out conditions going across I-80 between the two cities. Yet Fort Collins is just 1 hour from Laramie via 287 and it's a night and day difference in weather.
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  14. #14
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    North Georgia is not hot ( I can see why someone might think that because ga is beyond hot). Not expensive. With mass mountain trails...

  15. #15
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    My priorities:
    Near my kids, or at least one of them.
    Snow for skiing and fatbiking
    Close to large trail system.

    I might end up in the upper Midwest. Hopefully with an RV so I can ride all over the east coast (and finally learn to kiteboard).

  16. #16
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    I retired four years ago about a week after I turned 62.

    We moved to an "active" adult community this past June. My experience is that the definition of active adult in these communities is "your heart is beating and you have money" and if you have money, they will keep your heart beating. Though there is a hike/bike club, the biking is basically rail trails. Its a fun social event but definitely not the type of biking on MTBR.

    Fortunately, we live in North Jersey so finding like minded people is no problem only you are not going to find them in an adult community. I find rides on Meetup.com and other sites. There are plenty of people our age who want to ride but you have to seek them out.

    I also ski - a lot, like 85 days a season, so living anywhere not near a ski area is not going to happen. Besides our local hills, New England is five hours away and any where else is usually a non-stop flight from Newark Liberty Airport.

    Oh, yeah, I still surf. An ocean better be close and I love NYC too.

    Honestly, if money is an issue, don't move to NJ to retire. It really is a fantastic place to live but there is a reason it was picked deal last as a place to retire. My wife and I are lucky and travel a great deal and I've been to 49 states. Personally, I'd rather vacation in different areas and live here but that is me. We're heading to Norcal next week to ride with friends and have in-laws in Hawaii so we have options other people may not have and both our son's live here.

    Enough though. You are going to have to decide what is most important to you.

  17. #17
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    Year round riding?

    If you are looking for year round riding then you have fewer options. And how much riding do you do, and what type? Some people ride 5 miles per day and put their bikes away in winter. So where they live is not that big a deal. I retired where I could do my kind of mountain biking - 40 miles rides in mountainous terrain, year round. My two choices were the Auburn, CA area and Prescott, AZ. I chose Auburn because Tahoe is my favorite place to ride and it is a reasonable drive to bike there 5 months of the year, and then ride locally the rest of the year. And being a botanist I needed a bit more green than Prescott offered. Being retired I take trips to Arizona in the winter too. Lots of photos and info on these places on my biking site.

    Retirement, Where when??-auburn.jpg

    Retirement, Where when??-tahoe.jpg
    Last edited by Wherewolf; 09-21-2015 at 07:00 PM.

  18. #18
    Log off and go ride!
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    Consider Reno, NV. Low taxes, full amenity city. Close to Tahoe and all the riding, skiing, and backcountry of the Sierra, but NOT in California. Reno itself has relatively high housing costs. So look at Carson City, Gardnerville/Minden, or one of the outlying Reno suburbs.

    California is NOT a retirement friendly state. Consistently listed as one of the worst states for retirement.
    So many trails... so little time...

  19. #19
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    Santa Cruz Mountains. Nearest trails, 1/2 mile. San Francisco, 1/2 hour drive. It would be expensive to move here now, but I'm already here and the house is paid for. Property taxes are limited by Proposition 13 here and based on what I bought the place for 23 years ago (in the middle of a recession). Why would I want to move?

  20. #20
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    I love the idea of retiring to the Pacific NW but I'm not sure I can pull it off financially. I will move out of town when I go, though--the main advantage of where I am is that I can bike to work (2miles) but once that convenience is no longer required, there's little else holding me here...

  21. #21
    Trail Cubist
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    Sorry...but...retirement? HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!! ROTFL!!! LMAO!!!
    ---
    Ahem...well, I don't know about everyone else here...but I have zero intention of retiring for the following reasons:

    1. (the biggest) I can't afford it. Poke fun at me all you want, but life has dealt me a series of setbacks (some self-induced, others not) that have left me with nowhere near the mountain of cash and investments I'd need to kick back for the last 20+ years of my life and goof around.

    2. I'd very quickly get bored in retirement—unless I had a "Mt. Everest" of cash and investments that would allow me to endlessly travel the world.

    3. Work is fun for me. I enjoy challenging myself by staying relevant as I age—and it keeps my brain in better shape.

    4. If were to ever retire from my current career, I'd just launch a different one.

    ---
    Anyway, good thread—but it's also pretty irrelevant for me. (Anyone else?)

    Scott
    29er wheels are dangerous. They may cause you to go faster which can result in serious bodily injury. —Jim311

  22. #22
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    Retirement means different things to different people. To me it means more freedom and flexibility. Ill have enough retirement income to get by without working, but Ill continue to work part time and stay busy with volunteer work, riding, hiking, trailbuilding, and hobbies like travel, cooking and brewing beer.

  23. #23
    I Tried Them ALL... SuperModerator
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    Oh, the irony....

    LOL....the general premise of "Retirement" is grossly over-rated. Many folks feel just because they paid their dues, busting their asses off for 25-30 years.....they can finally relax and go sedentary, the remainder of their lives. The reality is - once you go sedentary...the weight piles on, the pains increase, new ailments come forward, etc. Next thing you know - you're blowing your entire retirement savings....just to remain alive comfortably. By sitting in front of a TV or movie screen, swinging a golf club, or going on weight gain excursions(ie: cruises), you're basically expediting "waiting to die." Many folks never grasp the "use it or lose it" concept of keeping physically active, for life.

    My final days will be spent either working part-time, and staying as active as I am today....which includes lots of riding.
    Last edited by Cayenne_Pepa; 09-23-2015 at 02:03 PM.
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  24. #24
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    Where do you live now?
    The reason why is to get a baseline for:

    What is humidity to you?

    What are taxes where you are now? ( and are there programs to reduce them in some of your choices)

    What is "year round riding" to you?

  25. #25
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    Live in panhandle of texasPretty windy and dry but can mountainbike Palo Duro Canyon year round and ride road bike 3 seasons pretty well.Property taxes seem high but no state income tax.Thinking snowbird type scenario,Maybe Bend Oregon and Arizona or Boise Idaho and Florida beachReally like retirement community where there is lots of stuff to do and people to do them with.

  26. #26
    Vincit qui patitur
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    Some place where I can ski, fatbike, downhill, crosscountry, bikepack and go 4 wheeling.
    The only place I can think of is...... Colorado Rockies.
    We are currently looking for places since we are hoping to be semi retiring in a couple years.
    Vincit qui patitur
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  27. #27
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    I'm retired in Gallup, New Mexico, which would not be the place to go if you are thinking of a real civilized retirement. But if you are someone who has to have a mountain to roam, most land here is public, so you can pretty much go anywhere and do anything you want to at any time. My opinion is to retire as soon as possible. Everything changes when you have expanded time options, and the younger you are the more options you will have. My wife and I are both artists and retirement has given us the opportunity spend as much time making art as we want to. As the leader of the local trail advocacy and building group, Gallup Trails, I spend a lot of time designing trail routes, constructing trail furniture and signage, going to meetings, maintaining the website, etc. We have a small cabin/bike house on the nearby mountain that I spend a couple nights a week at, doing lots of riding, camping, hiking, xc skiing and thinking. At some point it is good to be involved in something larger than your own hedonism, and I feel like I'm making a difference here and am loved and appreciated by my community. I cannot imaging having a better life than I do right now, hope it lasts a long time to come.
    I ride with the best dogs.




  28. #28
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    Although I am at least ten years from retiring, I have been thinking Prescott, AZ would be an ideal spot (admittedly biased since I already live in Arizona). Lots of intermediate-level trails and decent weather for a good share of the year. It seems to be a very bike-friendly community where they are always building something new. With Sedona, Flagstaff, and Phoenix all just a short drive away you have a diverse choice of good trails and climate year round. For me year-round riding is pretty important; getting back in shape after a three-month layoff I expect to get more difficult as I get older.

  29. #29
    Meatbomb
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    Are you guys really basing your retirement on the mountain biking trails? When I retire, I want to see the world, not Prescott.

  30. #30
    saddlemeat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo View Post
    Are you guys really basing your retirement on the mountain biking trails? When I retire, I want to see the world, not Prescott.
    You MAy find your outlook is different when you actually retire. I've seen much of the world, plan to see more, but I recommend everyone doing that asap if you haven't. If you are hooked into a donkey job quit and pursue your real life now!
    I ride with the best dogs.




  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo View Post
    Are you guys really basing your retirement on the mountain biking trails? When I retire, I want to see the world, not Prescott.
    Prescott, yes, and Flag, Phx, Sedona, Utah, New Mexico, Colorado... One has to live somewhere, and the rest world is only a drive, plane ticket away. I've been to the Caribbean. My wife was born there. A visit every five years or so is plenty. And I've lived on a boat... meh.
    Vini vidi velo!

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by owtdorz View Post
    Some place where I can ski, fatbike, downhill, crosscountry, bikepack and go 4 wheeling.
    The only place I can think of is...... Colorado Rockies.
    We are currently looking for places since we are hoping to be semi retiring in a couple years.
    If you want to get away from the crowds, check out Eagle.

  33. #33
    Anytime. Anywhere.
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    I retired at 55 2 years ago and moved to a mtb mecca on Vancouver Island, Cumberland. I don't ski, but there is a local resort, ocean, some of the best mountain biking ever, and a laid back lifestyle while still having all the amenities that I could want nearby. While the area has lots of retirees, Cumberland is chocked full of young families, and a few not so young. Probably 8 mountain bikers live on my 1 block long street. I ride a lot, whenever I want, and have hooked up with a crew that are mostly in their 40s and 50s. I'm the oldest, but not the slowest. Retire, and ride more.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    I retired at 55 2 years ago and moved to a mtb mecca on Vancouver Island, Cumberland. I don't ski, but there is a local resort, ocean, some of the best mountain biking ever, and a laid back lifestyle while still having all the amenities that I could want nearby. While the area has lots of retirees, Cumberland is chocked full of young families, and a few not so young. Probably 8 mountain bikers live on my 1 block long street. I ride a lot, whenever I want, and have hooked up with a crew that are mostly in their 40s and 50s. I'm the oldest, but not the slowest. Retire, and ride more.
    Vini vidi velo!

  35. #35
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    Zachariah: Speak for yourself.

    I retired over four years ago and my savings have grown since then, I weight the same now as in college and the army, ride almost every day in the warm months and ski almost every day in the cold months. The sex is better too. What is this sedentary life you talk about? I never had time to have so much fun when I worked. Ailments? Nothing to speak about. Travel? Hell yes! Lots of travel.

    As I said, speak for yourself when you pan retirement.

  36. #36
    Anytime. Anywhere.
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    If you are not enjoying retirement, you are doing it wrong.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  37. #37
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    Your choice

    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    LOL....the general premise of "Retirement" is grossly over-rated.... The reality is - once you go sedentary...the weight piles on, the pains increase, new ailments come forward, etc. Next thing you know - you're blowing your entire retirement savings....just to remain alive comfortably. By sitting in front of a TV or movie screen, swinging a golf club, or going on weight gain excursions(ie: cruises), you're basically expediting "waiting to die."
    That's your choice, not mine.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by speedyd View Post
    I am 62 avid cyclist,Road and mountain.Want to retire somewhere where I can do both and hang out with like minded.Have been looking at retirement communities,not old folk homes,but places like saddlebrooke in Arizona.Plan on visiting Bend Oregon,Boise Idaho,St George Utah and others.Open to suggestions.Dont like humidty.That sort of rules out Florida.I think Georgia has some biking north of Atlanta.What are all you old guys thinking?
    Come to Haywood County, North Carolina. We are located just west of Asheville, NC, the road biking is great. Although mtbing options within the county are limited, there are unlimited mtb trails located in all directions, you will be living in the hub of mtbing in western North Carolina.

  39. #39
    Keep on Rockin...
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    Cool thread, so I'm tuning in. Though I am only 44 and plan to never retire - I'm in medicine and like it, and pays too well, but plan to go part time in my 50s.

    Trail work, designing and building and upgrading, are probably my favorite things, and keep me in better shape than riding itself. So, wherever I end up I'll need the freedom to pick up my mattock and saw and hike and build what I want, where I want, when I want. - without being hassled. I've been to areas that are very restrictive (rightfully so) when it comes to this sort of thing, and while the trails may be great, the loss of freedom would be too much for me. I suppose if I did live in an are with an abundance of very dialed trails I might be happy with riding by itself.

    Where I live right now is hardly exotic but I've got twenty plus acres adjacent to a vast tract of remote State Forest that is ripe for both riding, building, and trail skiing, and am in good with the Forestry guy. The family camps and rides from there all the time. I'm working on building my own cabin to live out of, and ride from, when the kids move on. Rough cut lumber mill up the road. I digress...

    So, I'll probably end up staying put, but take the extra time and money I save and spend time in places like BC and the like.


    Any advice on places that might be good for builders?

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by wncbiker View Post
    Come to Haywood County, North Carolina. We are located just west of Asheville, NC, the road biking is great. Although mtbing options within the county are limited, there are unlimited mtb trails located in all directions, you will be living in the hub of mtbing in western North Carolina.
    Oooo plenty of MTB trails and awesome roads to drive, I have an S2000 that is made for that area.

    Sounds tempting

  41. #41
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    I moved to Bend 10 years ago so I already live where I'm going to retire. I don't think I will ever move unless my husband and I find a place that suites us better and I can't see that happening.

    I'm not retiring anytime soon. I help people find houses to buy and I really enjoy that. I also work a bit in the creative field too.

  42. #42
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    I'm buying a 18 acre plot near DuPont State Forest in Brevard NC. It's got over 10,000 acres of land and 100 miles of trails, waterfalls, lakes and streams. Just turned 60 and will hanging it up at 65. Building a new home on this property which has a 1/2 mile border with DuPont, I can work from there during my last few years. It's about 30 minutes SW from Asheville, NC, where deadheads go to retire. The county is about half state or national forest. Fly fishing, kayaking, hiking and biking plus Asheville is home to about 24 breweries including Sierra Nevada and New Belgium. Not a bad plan, if you ask me

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by SWriverstone View Post
    Sorry...but...retirement? HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!! ROTFL!!! LMAO!!!
    ---
    Ahem...well, I don't know about everyone else here...but I have zero intention of retiring for the following reasons:

    1. (the biggest) I can't afford it. Poke fun at me all you want, but life has dealt me a series of setbacks (some self-induced, others not) that have left me with nowhere near the mountain of cash and investments I'd need to kick back for the last 20+ years of my life and goof around.

    2. I'd very quickly get bored in retirement—unless I had a "Mt. Everest" of cash and investments that would allow me to endlessly travel the world.

    3. Work is fun for me. I enjoy challenging myself by staying relevant as I age—and it keeps my brain in better shape.

    4. If were to ever retire from my current career, I'd just launch a different one.

    ---
    Anyway, good thread—but it's also pretty irrelevant for me. (Anyone else?)

    Scott

    Mr. SWriverstone,

    From what I have read about you, I think your a lucky guy .

  44. #44
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    i'm going to retire somewhere that i can bowhunt easily..and have great hospital care.

    haha..i cannot believe how fast life is playing on. crazy.
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  45. #45
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    I feel compelled to post up that all you guys retiring in your 40's and 50's are in a VERY elite and lucky minority. Do I envy you? Absolutely. But are you "normal?" Not even close. You're probably part of the 1% (or darn close to it).

    As I mentioned earlier, having enough of a mountain of cash and investments to kick back and goof around for a decade or three means you are FAR above the means of the majority of Americans.

    So enjoy it! :-)
    Scott
    29er wheels are dangerous. They may cause you to go faster which can result in serious bodily injury. —Jim311

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by SWriverstone View Post
    I feel compelled to post up that all you guys retiring in your 40's and 50's are in a VERY elite and lucky minority. Do I envy you? Absolutely. But are you "normal?" Not even close. You're probably part of the 1% (or darn close to it).

    As I mentioned earlier, having enough of a mountain of cash and investments to kick back and goof around for a decade or three means you are FAR above the means of the majority of Americans.

    So enjoy it! :-)
    Scott
    true.

    i wasted the early years of earning $ doing stupid things. mostly thinking with my pecker. i finally wised up and got a job. a career.

    i am on schedule to retire at 62, which is the best i can do. i'll be super comfortable.
    currently love my job as a civil engineer. mostly low stress, and i'm not full time behind a desk. i live near some great MTB bike areas..and being in the Bay Area, CA..i am not bored ever. food, shows, friends..mtn biking, and the outdoors is untapped by all the city folk here. i love it. i ride almost everyday now...if i'm not riding a trail, i'm jogging it.

    i learned one thing as i aged..it isnt just money you need to enter retirement..you need a good healthy foundation too. all the money isnt gonna last if you are fat, diabetic..have a bad heart..life will derail fast. really fast.

    keep moving!! now!
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  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by SWriverstone View Post
    I feel compelled to post up that all you guys retiring in your 40's and 50's are in a VERY elite and lucky minority. Do I envy you? Absolutely. But are you "normal?" Not even close. You're probably part of the 1% (or darn close to it).

    As I mentioned earlier, having enough of a mountain of cash and investments to kick back and goof around for a decade or three means you are FAR above the means of the majority of Americans.

    So enjoy it! :-)
    Scott
    Part of the 1%, ha... hardly! But you are right to a point, and I do feel fortunate to have this opportunity. I'll be retiring from my current job in just under a year at age 60, but I expect to work part-time at a job I enjoy until 64 or 65. Part time work will still leave me plenty of time to ride and travel. Our income will be modest, by many people's standards, but we'll have enough to get by and do the things we enjoy. One of the biggest benefits is that I'll have excellent heath care coverage as part of my retirement package. A small, affordable home and a simple lifestyle centered on outdoor activities is what makes this possible for us. My wife and I simply don't feel like we "need" a lot of the "trappings" (in all senses of the word) of what many people call "success". We also don't have any credit card debt, big loans to pay off, or kids to put through college, etc. The only "extravagance" is what I plan to spend on a couple of new bikes next year, but since riding keeps me young in heart and mind, I can easily justify that expense as a "need."

    I'm not sure what your circumstances are. You mentioned having a financial setback in a previous post. We've weathered a few of those ourselves. But is it possible you, like many Americans, think you "need" more than you actually do? All the best, VB
    Vini vidi velo!

  48. #48
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    Yeah, you don't have to be obscenely rich to retire before 60. My wife and I together make mid-$70k before taxes-I'm not sure that even counts as middle class any more. All it takes is a little planning, some sacrifices, and learning to live frugally. I've been saving toward retirement for 25 years, Anne's been doing so even longer I think. We have no kids, mortgage is paid off, we have few expenses or debts. I hope and believe we can comfortably retire at or even before age 60. I really want to go while I'm still young enough to ride and enjoy life a bit before I'm too decrepit!
    Last edited by SteveF; 10-08-2015 at 10:16 AM.

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    This is a great thread. Interesting to see other perspectives, along with the place suggestions.

    Living in Montreal is great in the summers. I hate the cold, so ideally I would love to leave from Jan to mid March every year. Turned 50 this year, my goal would be to leave during those months by the age of 55.

    Love the idea of Arizona, some of the pics other bikers put up are spectacular. Only I also love the ocean, and would love a place with biking and the ocean.

    If I could afford to retire today and spend my time outdoors from this age onward? ABSOLUTELY!

  50. #50
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    1%, hardly. I got a decent pension after serving in the Canadian Army, and RCAF. Could have stayed til age 60 but it wouldn't have increased my pension by much. Smaller house, low taxes, great riding.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cptjack View Post
    North Georgia is not hot ( I can see why someone might think that because ga is beyond hot). Not expensive. With mass mountain trails...
    That's where i plan on going.Been there abouts a couple of times , beautiful area.
    It's got mtns , streams , and lots of good riding .SHHHHHHHHH don't tell everyone !

  52. #52
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    While it has been hinted at, I'm surprised Durango Colorado has not been mentioned directly.
    I too am biased because I live here, but there is great mountain and road biking, skiing, no interstate nearby, 6 brewpubs, a college, and access to more diverse locations than just about anywhere. In the winter. Moab is only 2.5 hours away, Sedona is only 5. And in the summer, we have some of the best high country riding in the state, just 30 minutes away.
    I don't know that there is anything particularly geared towards retired folks, but if you want a town of like minded, outdoor orientated folks of every age, it is certainly here.
    YMMV
    Craig, Durango CO
    "Lighten up PAL" ... King Cage

  53. #53
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    Okay, I'll throw in my 2 cents...

    Fountain Hills, AZ(winter) / Durango, CO(summer). The wife and I are in our early fifties and not retired. McDowell Mtn park in our backyard in AZ and Raider Ridge in our backyard in CO. The cost of living is cheap in AZ and the Mayo clinic is down the road. Read the post above for a Durango description. 7.5 hour hi-way drive door-to-door.

    And please don't give me that b.s. about the 1% as both my wife and I have saved since leaving college and continue to bust our asses. If you want to retire at a decent age you need to live beneath your means, set some goals and invest your money wisely. If you're a trust fund baby, inherited a bunch of money or business then good for you otherwise you need to plan wisely for early retirement. 😉

  54. #54
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    Why retire to any one place is my opinion. I am planning on retiring in a couple of more years, sell the house here in Seattle, buy a trailer, and then the wife and I will set out on the 2 year, at least, trip that we have always wanted. I am forever cruising the web checking out the vibe of all the different places we all read about. Keeping a list. Love the vibe of Prescott; "yeah we can give you a map but why don't you stop by the bike shop. I am sure there will be a local hanging out that would love to show you around". Driggs ID, with TetonMTB and TVTAP looks very promising. And of course there is always all of Utah. Price UT springs mind right now. I am very excited about the journey ahead. Glorious, Simply Glorious.
    "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race" H.G. Wells

  55. #55
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    Isn't Craig Bierly from Seattle area, and did a similar thing in his sprinter. I believe he hangs out in Sedona mostly.
    Craig, Durango CO
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    I don't know Craig but I have a friend in Tucson that does the Sprinter thing for half the year when he is not working. I want a little more comfort for me and the wife myself. Plus she doesn't bike (mobility issues) and needs some place nice to hang out when she isn't shuttling me or I am out riding. Plus the trailer makes a great base/hangout when you meet people on the trail.

    Sedona has some really cool stuff but it gets a little hot during the summer. According to the NOAA app, Heber Valley, Ut is just about perfect for me right now. It is hanging right around 55/76 so not too cold and not too hot.

    As a brief aside, one really cool thing about our online community is it makes a great way to hook up with people when you are traveling. Cool stuff.

    Hmmmmm,.....as big believer in lots of forums for more traffic to a site that might be an idea for another one; traveling.
    "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race" H.G. Wells

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rev Bubba View Post

    Fortunately, we live in North Jersey.
    New Jersey is a beautiful state. Property taxes though are through the roof and I couldn't imagine retiring there unless I had a huge retirement cash cushion just to pay that huge property tax nut. I lived in N. NJ for 20 years, miss the Italian food. It's a great place to enjoy a high professional salary, but at a cost..

    For $hits and giggles I just zillowed my old house in Bernardsville - 2500 sq/ft house on a 19,000 sq/ft lot Zestimate $954K with 2014 property taxes of....ready for it..$14,544!

    As a comparison, my house in western metro Denver area: 3800 sq/ft on 17,000 sq/ft lot zestimate $485K and $2,600 in property taxes.

    Snow sports - take your pick some of the best big mtn terrain in the country. I can be at Loveland/A-Basin in an hour and change, Vail in under 2. GJ/Fruita in under 4 hours, Moab 5.5 hours. Local riding is stellar as well, but getting busy during the weekends.

    What I struggle with is the snow in March and April in Denver. We are all done with it and want to push into spring. The goal is to have the house paid off and I would get a tow-behind RV for some camping in warmer weather during the fringe months. Tucson is an easy 14 hour drive. We ran into a couple from MA rolling through town who just purchased a 2015 Forest River Vibe Extreme Lite 308BH, Little Falls MN - - RVtrader.com and he gets 12 mpg pulling it with a F150 Ecoboost. Said it pulled 65 up Loveland/Vail passes and "barely knew it was there"...

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by cbrossman View Post
    Isn't Craig Bierly from Seattle area, and did a similar thing in his sprinter. I believe he hangs out in Sedona mostly.
    Craig has been doing it for awhile now, we always enjoy his visits to the Zuni Mountains!

    Quote Originally Posted by SlimL View Post

    As a brief aside, one really cool thing about our online community is it makes a great way to hook up with people when you are traveling. Cool stuff.

    Hmmmmm,.....as big believer in lots of forums for more traffic to a site that might be an idea for another one; traveling.
    Great idea!
    I ride with the best dogs.




  59. #59
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    Moab

    Hiking, river rafting, fishing/hunting, Lake Powell, 4x4, great backcountry and groomed XC skiing and snowmobiling in the winter in the mountains while it is generally really nice in town, great library, great arts scene, relatively low property taxes and other expenses, small but well equipped hospital, new USU campus will (probably) be built by the time I get there so there will be educational opportunities, etc. etc. etc.

    Oh and there are a few mountain bike trails there, too.

    Not for everyone, but perfect for me. I can't wait to get out of the clusterf**k that the Colorado Front Range is becoming.

  60. #60
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    This November marks 4 years since retirement. I mention this as what WAS supposedly our dream (travel) didn't pan out, and things NEVER considered (Mountain biking) could turn out to be the best part of the day.

    Have several hobbies. doing the same thing every day gets booooooorrrrrrrrring.

    We get old because we stop playing

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    Moab

    Hiking, river rafting, fishing/hunting, Lake Powell, 4x4, great backcountry and groomed XC skiing and snowmobiling in the winter in the mountains while it is generally really nice in town, great library, great arts scene, relatively low property taxes and other expenses, small but well equipped hospital, new USU campus will (probably) be built by the time I get there so there will be educational opportunities, etc. etc. etc.

    Oh and there are a few mountain bike trails there, too.

    Not for everyone, but perfect for me. I can't wait to get out of the clusterf**k that the Colorado Front Range is becoming.
    What's happening to the FR to make it a CF? I honestly am curious...

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by sisu View Post
    What's happening to the FR to make it a CF? I honestly am curious...
    The bottom line is too many people. This affects mountain biking in that all of the accessible trails are crowded after working hours and on weekends, sometimes so crowded you can't even park at the trailheads. Even if you can find a place to park, you end up only being able to ride a minute or two at a time on singletrack because you are constantly having to stop to yield to hikes/horses/other riders. So, you have to drive to get away from everyone, but the highways are jammed, too. You don't dare go to the high country unless you can go Monday-Thursday, unless you like sitting in traffic jams. Like to ski? Forget that for the same reasons, unless you are rich enough to buy a condo near a ski area. Even then, you can forget DH skiing on weekends or holiday periods. Too crowded.


    If you were retired right now, today, you could deal by riding/skiing/hiking during the week, but my retirement is 5-7 years out. When I moved here in the late 80's, the population on the FR was about 1.5 million. Now, it is over 3 million, by the time I retire it will be 4 million, and by the time I die it will likely be 6-8 million. The main close in trails are on the west side of the Denver metro, and between Lakewood and Longmont there are over 30,000 houses already approved and in the process of being built. The trail use has doubled just in the past few years in Jeffco and Boulder, and another 75,000 people will be landing in the next 2-4 years as those houses are built. Add to that the population growth in the eastern metro, at least a few of those people drive out and ride, and it is just not enjoyable any more.

    I do many other things besides ride, and they all have the same issues. I used to shoot trap, and when I moved here there were three gun clubs within thirty minutes of my house, and two designated National Forest ranges. EVERY SINGLE ONE has closed. The closest public trap is now over an hour away, and there are ZERO sanctioned shooting areas in the National Forest.

    They finally opened Gross Reservoir to kayaking a few years ago, so I bought a kayak. The first few years were fine. Now, if you aren't parked at the ramp by 9 AM, you can't get within a mile of it.

    DH skiing? Even if you want to deal with the traffic, even discounted lift tickets are $50-70. I used to go to Eldora a lot, but they close the parking lot on good days now, due to being at capacity.

    I moved here for the outdoor rec opportunities, and I decided I could put up with the city/suburb life for the job opportunities combined with the convenient and relatively uncrowded rec. It has all changed. People from the east and west coasts love it when they move here, but they are used to being ******* to elbow everywhere they go. I grew up in a small town in the midwest, my wife grew up on a farm, and we just aren't cut out for this crap. On top of all of this, the cost of living is getting stupid. Yes, property taxes are low, but CO has figured out how to get the money back through fees, tolls and sales taxes. Housing is ridiculous now, but since we bought many years ago, we are OK with that aspect. I can't believe what people are paying to live in extremely poorly built houses on postage stamp lots next to highways, train tracks, superfund sites, garbage dumps, etc. The builders here cut corners at every phase, and the owners are stuck with the issues 10 years down the line. I saw it when they built Rock Creek, and I see it now with all of the crap they are building between Lakewood and Longmont. Not to mention the very idea of having a $500,000 "single family" house so close to the one next door you can hear your neighbor fart. You would be better off in a townhouse or apartment where they at least have sound barriers.

    Think Silicon Valley. Chicago suburbs. Houston. Dallas. That is what the FR has become.

    Not. For. Us.

  63. #63
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    honkinunit- You will like Moab and the Southwest! Drop by Gallup sometime after you get there.
    I ride with the best dogs.




  64. #64
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    I retired three years ago at age 61 and live in a little town in Marin County called San Anselmo. I've lived here my entire life and my wife is still employed as the Pastry Chef at a local restaurant/deli.

    Gary Fisher lived in the neighborhood before moving to San Francisco and the weather is perfect for riding all year long. I rode the Hoo Koo E Koo trail two days ago that was the name of one of Fisher's mountain bikes and ride Mount Tamalpais three days a week.

    I own my home so I can live off my pension and my wife's income. Life is prertty good so far.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by matuchi View Post
    I retired three years ago at age 61 and live in a little town in Marin County called San Anselmo. I've lived here my entire life and my wife is still employed as the Pastry Chef at a local restaurant/deli.

    Gary Fisher lived in the neighborhood before moving to San Francisco and the weather is perfect for riding all year long. I rode the Hoo Koo E Koo trail two days ago that was the name of one of Fisher's mountain bikes and ride Mount Tamalpais three days a week.

    I own my home so I can live off my pension and my wife's income. Life is prertty good so far.
    A little crowded for my taste, but a nice area for sure. Love the climate in Marin. But with a median home price of over $1 million, it's hard for average Joes to retire there, unless you were raised there.
    Vini vidi velo!

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by veloborealis View Post
    A little crowded for my taste, but a nice area for sure. Love the climate in Marin. But with a median home price of over $1 million, it's hard for average Joes to retire there, unless you were raised there.
    I was born in Ross Hospital in 1951 and grew up here and lived my entire live in Marin. Many years ago you could afford to buy a home with a decent full time job. I could not afford to move here if I was buying now.

  67. #67
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    I was born in Boulder, CO in 1951.
    My wife and I are retired 2 years now in the PacNW. We sold the house in the mountains but not just because the snow sucked last year. Hoping to hang out in Whistler and Whitefish in winter, and summer on the sailboat we live on in Puget Sound. Last summer included some bluegrass in Ladysmith, BC, and crabbing in Sucia. Sailing (like mountain biking) is a lot more awesome when you don't have deadlines.
    Just returned from 3 months in Europe and waiting for the snow to dump! Mt Biking fills in any time in the NW. We do ride in the rain and sleet!
    Bought a cargo bike for grocery shopping and riding to the pub! I keep it on the deck when cruising.
    I still work as custodian on our investment properties on occasion to beat the doldrums of drinking too early! not that it always wins (wink, wink, know wha aye mean)
    I am trying to get my wife to move to Bellingham, WA. We lived there many moons ago! Great snowboarding and mountaineering, great sailing and biking, small college town with a great attitude and close to Seattle and Vancouver, BC (not to mention Whistler!)

    Retirement sucks!

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    The bottom line is too many people. This affects mountain biking in that all of the accessible trails are crowded after working hours and on weekends, sometimes so crowded you can't even park at the trailheads. Even if you can find a place to park, you end up only being able to ride a minute or two at a time on singletrack because you are constantly having to stop to yield to hikes/horses/other riders. So, you have to drive to get away from everyone, but the highways are jammed, too. You don't dare go to the high country unless you can go Monday-Thursday, unless you like sitting in traffic jams. Like to ski? Forget that for the same reasons, unless you are rich enough to buy a condo near a ski area. Even then, you can forget DH skiing on weekends or holiday periods. Too crowded.


    If you were retired right now, today, you could deal by riding/skiing/hiking during the week, but my retirement is 5-7 years out. When I moved here in the late 80's, the population on the FR was about 1.5 million. Now, it is over 3 million, by the time I retire it will be 4 million, and by the time I die it will likely be 6-8 million. The main close in trails are on the west side of the Denver metro, and between Lakewood and Longmont there are over 30,000 houses already approved and in the process of being built. The trail use has doubled just in the past few years in Jeffco and Boulder, and another 75,000 people will be landing in the next 2-4 years as those houses are built. Add to that the population growth in the eastern metro, at least a few of those people drive out and ride, and it is just not enjoyable any more.

    I do many other things besides ride, and they all have the same issues. I used to shoot trap, and when I moved here there were three gun clubs within thirty minutes of my house, and two designated National Forest ranges. EVERY SINGLE ONE has closed. The closest public trap is now over an hour away, and there are ZERO sanctioned shooting areas in the National Forest.

    They finally opened Gross Reservoir to kayaking a few years ago, so I bought a kayak. The first few years were fine. Now, if you aren't parked at the ramp by 9 AM, you can't get within a mile of it.

    DH skiing? Even if you want to deal with the traffic, even discounted lift tickets are $50-70. I used to go to Eldora a lot, but they close the parking lot on good days now, due to being at capacity.

    I moved here for the outdoor rec opportunities, and I decided I could put up with the city/suburb life for the job opportunities combined with the convenient and relatively uncrowded rec. It has all changed. People from the east and west coasts love it when they move here, but they are used to being ******* to elbow everywhere they go. I grew up in a small town in the midwest, my wife grew up on a farm, and we just aren't cut out for this crap. On top of all of this, the cost of living is getting stupid. Yes, property taxes are low, but CO has figured out how to get the money back through fees, tolls and sales taxes. Housing is ridiculous now, but since we bought many years ago, we are OK with that aspect. I can't believe what people are paying to live in extremely poorly built houses on postage stamp lots next to highways, train tracks, superfund sites, garbage dumps, etc. The builders here cut corners at every phase, and the owners are stuck with the issues 10 years down the line. I saw it when they built Rock Creek, and I see it now with all of the crap they are building between Lakewood and Longmont. Not to mention the very idea of having a $500,000 "single family" house so close to the one next door you can hear your neighbor fart. You would be better off in a townhouse or apartment where they at least have sound barriers.

    Think Silicon Valley. Chicago suburbs. Houston. Dallas. That is what the FR has become.

    Not. For. Us.
    Sounds like Seattle to me. Born and raised here and can't wait to get out. I understand that it is great for some but you know; different spokes for different folks.
    "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race" H.G. Wells

  69. #69
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    Enjoy your good fortune...

    Quote Originally Posted by matuchi View Post
    I was born in Ross Hospital in 1951 and grew up here and lived my entire live in Marin. Many years ago you could afford to buy a home with a decent full time job. I could not afford to move here if I was buying now.
    I have family scattered along the stretch of coast between Pacifica and Half Moon Bay. I love the Coast Range trails between there and SC, as well as the climate. I would love to retire there, but there's just no way. The little 900 sq. ft. cottage my grandfather built for $5K in 1955 (land included, 1/4 acre lot), just sold for $775K, one of the cheapest properties in the area. Sold to family, so it's still standing. Most potential buyers would have torn the house down and rebuilt. Makes me wish (kinda) I'd followed by Bay Area cousins into the building trades instead of going off to college and moving to Alaska. Still looking forward to heading south to AZ in a year, though, where I can ride year round AND afford to live.
    Vini vidi velo!

  70. #70
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    [QUOTE'.......Still looking forward to heading south to AZ in a year, though, where I can ride year round AND afford to live.[/QUOTE]

    Got that right. While Tucson still seems a little hot for me right now, Prescott looks just about perfect.

    Heber City in Utah also.
    "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race" H.G. Wells

  71. #71
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    sold our place in PC Feb 2014 and have not got back except to visit. we live in the mid atlantic and have been thinking about finding a community in PC. My wife does not ride and thinks we need one of the golf club communities to really meet people...what are your thoughts?

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by dcitron View Post
    sold our place in PC Feb 2014 and have not got back except to visit. we live in the mid atlantic and have been thinking about finding a community in PC. My wife does not ride and thinks we need one of the golf club communities to really meet people...what are your thoughts?
    I don't golf so I don't know what a golf community would be like. But as long as there are other people that are doing the things that you enjoy also, there probably would be a group that you could hook up with. I do a few different things so I always find ways to hook up with people. Though the other side of that coin is I am one of my favorite people to spend time with.

    This is specially true with the tourist based town. Prescott's MTB club provides an email addy to get in contact with someone to ride with. Driggs, ID has the TVTAP which is both bike and X-Country skiing. Just to name a few.

    If you're a joiner, you probably could meet people any where you go. Sign up for a few newsletters and you will see what I mean.
    "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race" H.G. Wells

  73. #73
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    In the EastBay in N. Cal and am basically retired. I plan on doing some part time stuff but I find plenty to do around the house. I ride daily as I'm only a mile from trails and quiet. I have one in college and one still in HS so until the wife and I know where they might end up we are staying put. We have traveled the entire coast and every state west of Colorado with our trailer to see where we might like to move someday. Weather wise N.Cal is hard to beat but our $'s go so much farther elsewhere. We loved the Boise area, parts of Colorado, and AZ but all have limitations for riding during the year. Bend,OR is fantastic but overall cost isn't much different then the BayArea.
    I guess we could stay as a home base and just invest in a big RV.

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    Not for everyone, but perfect for me. I can't wait to get out of the clusterf**k that the Colorado Front Range is becoming.
    Half the people moving to Durango are from that side of the hill, including myself. I travel back for work occasionally, I can hardly wait to leave once I'm there.
    And with like 1000 brew pubs, why can't I find one with a happy hour?
    Craig, Durango CO
    "Lighten up PAL" ... King Cage

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankyone View Post
    I am trying to get my wife to move to Bellingham, WA. We lived there many moons ago! Great snowboarding and mountaineering, great sailing and biking, small college town with a great attitude and close to Seattle and Vancouver, BC (not to mention Whistler!)

    Retirement sucks!
    Bellingham has always interested me, I spent some time there with friends when I was a graduate student at WSU. Our children are on the west coast now, so it Bellingham would put us closer to them.
    So while me and my asthma would appreciate the abundance of air out there, it is sure would be a difficult transition from SW weather to PNW weather.
    Craig, Durango CO
    "Lighten up PAL" ... King Cage

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    Quote Originally Posted by cbrossman View Post
    Half the people moving to Durango are from that side of the hill, including myself. I travel back for work occasionally, I can hardly wait to leave once I'm there.

    And with like 1000 brew pubs, why can't I find one with a happy hour?
    You cannot find a brewpub with a happy hour for the same reason you can't find a studio apartment for $1000/mo: (some) businesses are booming, and people are spending money like there is no tomorrow. Why sell for $3.50 when you can get $5?

    There was an article in the Denver Post last weekend about just how urban the Front Range has become. No surprise here, but I'm guessing many people from "elsewhere" would be surprised:

    Colorado rurality an urban legend - The Denver Post

    We've had a good run on the Front Range, but believe me, we are counting down until we can GTFO. I can't imagine anyone retiring here, but obviously I am in the minority, because there are 55+ retirement communities popping up.

    The next five years are going to be a challenge for us.

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by cbrossman View Post
    Bellingham has always interested me, I spent some time there with friends when I was a graduate student at WSU. Our children are on the west coast now, so it Bellingham would put us closer to them.
    So while me and my asthma would appreciate the abundance of air out there, it is sure would be a difficult transition from SW weather to PNW weather.
    A good friend of mine who is a Colorado native and who has never lived anywhere else, just retired to Bellingham, and five years ago our next-door neighbors, also CO natives, retired there. They love it.

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    Albuquerque for a medium sized city. You can ride all year or go skiing in the winter (depends on the winter). Outstanding road riding as the shoulders are huge and bike paths extensive plus excellent mtb. No humidity, no bugs, limited culture, cheap housing, 2.5 hour drive from Mexico and 6 hours to Sedona or Moab.
    Albuquerque Mountain Bike Association (AMBA) - Albuquerque, New Mexico Mountain Bike Advocacy and the NM thread on this site

    Prescott or Sedona for a small town.

  79. #79
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    Retired last May and just turned 61. Loving ever minute of it so far, but it was definitely a change from a well paying, but relatively high stress position. Felt like jumping out of a moving vehicle at first!

    We were fortunate enough to have a solid plan that we have been working on for quite some time, and also sought professional guidance with Financial Planning.

    Surprised to see the negative comments on retirement, but it is definitely a very personal choice. One post in particular seems to think that retirement is a binary choice. You retire and you sit and await the grim reaper, or you keep working! I'm sure there are people that do that, but there are tons of levels in-between. I gave my self one year to just play and do whatever the hell I want to and then I plan to either work part time or get significantly involved with a volunteering effort. I have plenty to keep me busy!

    In regards to location we're in the Sierra Foothills on Lake Folsom. I can roll out of my garage and be on the trails in about 4 minutes. Its awesome and I ride 2-4 times a week locally with trips to the multitude of other areas in-between. I'm also a big motorcycle guy and the riding around here is spectacular. Yosemite to the south, Tahoe, Lassen, out to the coast, wine country, all lots of fun. If you ski, Tahoe is a little over an hour away. Sacramento and the Bay Area 90 minutes provide just about anything you can think of from an entertainment, arts and dining experience.

    Great year round MTB riding with the exception of a couple of months in the summer that get pretty toasty, but our group is usually out on the trails by 6:30am so its still great.

    CA isn't for everyone, as pointed out. It is not retirement friendly from a financial perspective, but the majority of Northern CA is a pretty cool place to live. East of Sacramento in the foothills is pretty affordable compared to the Bay. The Bay Area is just nuts price wise and the bubble keeps growing. Scary stuff.

    The only other place we would consider is the Portland, OR area since we spent 8 years there and loved it except for the gray and overcast winter. If you don't ride in mud and rain, you don't ride, but the summer months are spectacular. We lived across the river in Vancouver so no state income tax and Oregon has no sales tax, so its the best of both worlds. We also lived in Seattle, but that was even worse weather wise and I need sun!

    Good luck to all the future MTB retirees figuring out which locale makes the most sense to their particular situation!

    Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by granpa View Post
    Albuquerque for a medium sized city. You can ride all year or go skiing in the winter (depends on the winter). Outstanding road riding as the shoulders are huge and bike paths extensive plus excellent mtb. No humidity, no bugs, limited culture, cheap housing, 2.5 hour drive from Mexico and 6 hours to Sedona or Moab.
    Albuquerque Mountain Bike Association (AMBA) - Albuquerque, New Mexico Mountain Bike Advocacy and the NM thread on this site

    Prescott or Sedona for a small town.
    The problem with ABQ is the crime rate, real or perceived. I know that north of ABQ there are some great places, but my friend who lives up there has a super expensive security system on his house and packs heat everywhere he goes. I asked him if things were really that bad, and he just looked at me and "Yes!". He is retiring to Pagosa Springs.

    One thing I can say about the FR that is positive is that the overall crime rate is not terribly high, and most of the crime is predictable in both location and situation. Yes, if you make a habit of hanging in LoDo until the bars close you are going to have some issues, and Denver has its 'hoods that you want to steer clear from but outside of that, crime is not that bad.

    If you live in the burbs and have a "normal" life, you will probably be OK.

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    The problem with ABQ is the crime rate, real or perceived.

    Can't argue with a local that say's that, however I've talked with numerous "locals" that say that the crime is more relegated to the "high crime areas" that most cities have. IE, don't go there and you won't have problems.
    I don't know personally, but I think ABQ has everything I'm looking for in a community, re recreation, sufficient airport (SWA...yeah), proximity to other recreation, dry, temperate climate. Just wished I knew more about the real crime scene.
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    Well put Abq. on your list to visit and we'll do a ride. The state is poor and burglary is random and rampant. Violent crime is (mostly) confined to criminals shooting/stabbing each other. If you're not prone to bar hopping at 2 in the morning your OK.

    There is a huge road riding community and large mtb. community. The closest mountain biking is in the foothills east of the city and in many places its an easy ride to the trails out of your door.

    There is a huge hispanic community which may be a bit of a culture shock depending on where your from.

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    70's, sunshine and 60+ miles of single track and not a soul in sight...

    For you guys tired of the crowded front range, Cali, etc, here's an option for you... Fountain Hills, AZ. Blow up the pic. Do you see crowds on the trail looking down the mountain ? I thought not ! Also, you have Prescott, Sedona, Tucson and Flagstaff all within a two hour drive. ALL of these areas are at different elevations and have different types of riding terrain.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Retirement, Where when??-image.jpg  


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    Quote Originally Posted by Ob1Hoagie View Post
    For you guys tired of the crowded front range, Cali, etc, here's an option for you... Fountain Hills, AZ. Blow up the pic. Do you see crowds on the trail looking down the mountain ? I thought not ! Also, you have Prescott, Sedona, Tucson and Flagstaff all within a two hour drive. ALL of these areas are at different elevations and have different types of riding terrain.
    Is that McDowell Park? I put it on list to check out. Right along side your name :-)
    "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race" H.G. Wells

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    What about Pine/Strawberry? I think they have a pretty extensive Mtb trail system. Downsides?
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    It's actually a view from the Scottsdale preserve which has trails that are directly connected to McDowell Mtn park. You can look at online maps for the Scottsdale preserve, McDowell Mtn park and the Fountain Hills preserve and view all of the interconnected trails. Scottsdale is continually adding land to their preserve which is going north right into Tonto National forest.

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    I'm just not that familiar w/the trails around Pine/Strawberry. I'd page some guys on this thread -> Pine / Strawberry trails
    and see if they can help you out.

    "Some" folks like to keep trails on the down-low in AZ ;-)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ob1Hoagie View Post
    It's actually a view from the Scottsdale preserve which has trails that are directly connected to McDowell Mtn park. You can look at online maps for the Scottsdale preserve, McDowell Mtn park and the Fountain Hills preserve and view all of the interconnected trails. Scottsdale is continually adding land to their preserve which is going north right into Tonto National forest.
    Looks like a great place to ride. Ginie is already talking about going to Phoenix next year so I may hit you up for a place to ride or where to rent a bike. It's Tucson this year for Thanksgiving and a ride with SDMB.

    The only thing about Strawberry that I have on my list is Strawberry Mountain. Just time to go exploring I guess.
    "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race" H.G. Wells

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ob1Hoagie View Post
    It's actually a view from the Scottsdale preserve which has trails that are directly connected to McDowell Mtn park. You can look at online maps for the Scottsdale preserve, McDowell Mtn park and the Fountain Hills preserve and view all of the interconnected trails. Scottsdale is continually adding land to their preserve which is going north right into Tonto National forest.
    We spend time in the Scottsdale area during late winter/spring. Have you ridden Brown's Ranch yet? I was mostly riding McD Mtn and Phx Preserve until this yr when someone told me about Brown's. Worth adding to your list of tracks to check out if haven't already.

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    I have Brown's Ranch on my list under Phoenix. I have heard that between McDowell Mountain, Scottsdale Preserve and Brown's Ranch there is over 100 miles of single track up there. I will never get that all done.
    "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race" H.G. Wells

  91. #91
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    Interesting. I spent almost 3 years on sailboats, two of those years were on my own sloop. I preferred the South Pacific but that is a big step since you only really sail one way, with the wind. I'd love to hear how this works out.

  92. #92
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    3 years until I hang it up at 59.5 Palisade, western Colorado is where we live and where we'll stay. Lots of bike trails close here in the desert and the high country. Moab is 2 hours away. Bike 9 months of the year or more, ski our butt's off when we can't ride. hunt, fish, and live in a town with no stop lights. There's always New Zealand if winter gets too long.

    I don't get the retire and die attitude, they must not have enough curiosity and creativity.

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    Yup, Durango is where I'm headed. Retiring in a year and happy. I bought a house there a couple of years ago and have been fixing it up. I won't be bored because there is still plenty of work to do on the property. For the last 20 years work has seriously gotten in the way of my projects. So, I'll be busy.

    Travel the world? I know many disagree but traveling is way overrated (unless its to ride new trails). Been around the world and Like Dorothy said, "There's no place like home." We've arrived! Now what? I guess we eat.

    What can I say about cruises?, Been on several. Food was good. Now what?
    I found I was always wishing I was home and cycling, improving my home, flying RC, driving my Cobra, restoring my Land Cruiser, playing guitar, cooking, spending time with friends. Did I mention cycling?

    Yes, I think it's a good idea to include activities you like when deciding where to live. Hmm, Durango will shorten my Cobra driving season...Time for a fat bike.
    Goat Rider

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    Ha-ha...."top dining establishments"? That's comical. "Excellent bike shops"? Maybe talented, helpful employees but the "shops" are pathetic compared to a quality shop such as The Path or Bike Bling for starters. The best riding up there (by far) burned two years ago and will NEVER come back the way it was *per the guys at The Hub*.

    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    Idyllwild, CA(4600ft) has 40+ miles combined network of trails you can ride straight out of your front door, 300 days out of the year. Idyllwild has homes, starting at $25k to $450k. The riding locals consists of a 69-year-old singlespeeder, 86-year-old trail rider, a few CAT1 XC pros, a World-Class marathon racer and a bunch of bikepackers, mixed with a few trail enthusiasts. Two excellent bike shops are up there, who can do everything from fork, shock and suspension service....to alloy frame repair.

    For a retired biker - Idyllwild is literally a Country Club: with top dining establishments, hiking, nearby lakes.....all in a Alpine environment.

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    I'm going to guess you're not retired eh since you couldn't be more wrong. Admittedly, as someone posted above, retirement means something different to everybody but I retired last December after 31 years in my profession. I've lost weight, ride or workout in some way (6) days a week, many times twice a day. In just 10 months, I've been on MTB trips to Oregon, Sedona, Durango, St George twice on top of vacations to Cancun, Cabo twice, Chicago and Texas. For 2016, I already have MTB trips planned for St George, Moab and Durango on top of rafting the Grand Canyon and house boating on Lake Powell. So much for sitting around and waiting to die.

    As far as money, I have TRIPLE the money in my bank account now than I used to carry. it's all proper planning on going on trips with like minded folks to split the costs.


    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    LOL....the general premise of "Retirement" is grossly over-rated. Many folks feel just because they paid their dues, busting their asses off for 25-30 years.....they can finally relax and go sedentary, the remainder of their lives. The reality is - once you go sedentary...the weight piles on, the pains increase, new ailments come forward, etc. Next thing you know - you're blowing your entire retirement savings....just to remain alive comfortably. By sitting in front of a TV or movie screen, swinging a golf club, or going on weight gain excursions(ie: cruises), you're basically expediting "waiting to die." Many folks never grasp the "use it or lose it" concept of keeping physically active, for life.

    My final days will be spent either working part-time, and staying as active as I am today....which includes lots of riding.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    If you are not enjoying retirement, you are doing it wrong.
    Exactly!! Ride on!!!

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    I have family out in Bayfield so I'm there every year for 10-14 days. I bike every other day when I'm there and generally like the area but Durango is too over-run and built up for my tastes. Real estate is also pricey compared to many other areas people are mentioning. If Phil's World was in Durango instead of Cortez, I may change my mind


    Quote Originally Posted by cbrossman View Post
    While it has been hinted at, I'm surprised Durango Colorado has not been mentioned directly.
    I too am biased because I live here, but there is great mountain and road biking, skiing, no interstate nearby, 6 brewpubs, a college, and access to more diverse locations than just about anywhere. In the winter. Moab is only 2.5 hours away, Sedona is only 5. And in the summer, we have some of the best high country riding in the state, just 30 minutes away.
    I don't know that there is anything particularly geared towards retired folks, but if you want a town of like minded, outdoor orientated folks of every age, it is certainly here.
    YMMV

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    I checked out last December after 31 years in law enforcement. We live in North San Diego County and I can ride 350 days a year. As it is, I ride one form of bike, go to the gym or hike/walk (6) days a week. But it's crowded, traffic sucks, CA taxes are ridiculous and the political scene is turning into a Bernie Sanders nirvana. My wife has an awesome job with great pay and benefits which is what keeps us here...and content for now. Once she gets burned out, we're outta here.

    Between mountain biking and/or skiing/snowboarding, I've been all over the Western US including 90% of the places mentioned over these (4) pages. I have family in Durango, a kid in Boise, another in the Texas Hill Country. I ride in Utah, AZ and Oregon every year and every place has their pluses and minuses. When the time comes, I'll make some sort of chart to compare the places I'm interested in (and where my wife is willing to live). MTB riding, proximity to a decent ski resort are important and I will also factor in where the kids are currently stationed as they are both officers in the Army.

  99. #99
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    Very good. Fact is life can be awesome if you want it to be that way. Good job People!

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    I love this thread! I am getting more good ideas on where I want to visit then I ever thought I could have. There are good trails everywhere. Maybe I won't ever stop being a gypsy. Specially now that my wife is buying into it.

    One of the things I really like is that we all are a little different, but all really enjoy good trails what ever we as individuals think they are. Ride On Old Guys

    My buddy from AZ suggested I look at Payson for some good places to ride. Hmmmmmm, sounds like a Google Challenge.

    As far as the downer guy on retirement, sounds like he might not have planned ahead.
    "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race" H.G. Wells

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