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  1. #101
    My cup runneth over
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    55 and three painful crashes this year, one of which put me in urgent care for stitches. Riding harder and faster this year due to a new bike. First new bike in 7 years so significantly better geo++. 4 KOMs on my local trails, 3 downhill - this bike really rips. Pretty much all three crashes were me finding the limits of what the new bike can handle combined with me being a little lazy/off.

    Lots of weights/cross-training for me as well as riding - typical week is 7,000 feet of climbing; a good week, 10,000 and a great week 14,000.

    The one thing I have been learning is if I am not really 'feeling it' then hold back. I used to not let how I was feeling dictate how I was riding. Just recently I am taking it much more into account. Just this last weekend I skipped a high speed 2 foot drop that I have taken dozens of times because I knew I was slightly 'off my game' - I think that is a valuable adjustment for us as we age. I really, really hate downtime off the bike.

  2. #102
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    I've had a number of crashes OTB, washouts and the like. Had a bad wreck two years ago that sent me to the emergency room. In my earlier years I did a lot of high risk mountain climbing as well spent alot of time in the martial arts competing in tournaments, including full contact. I've been hurt worse on my Mountain bike than any of those two endeavors
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  3. #103
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    For me it has become priorities. I didn't get on a mountain bike until I was 61. I crashed more than I should have but kept pushing to get to intermediate trails. Ironically when I was 63 it was on my road bike that I shattered my clavicle. The very first ride back I clipped a tree. No big thing except it turned out that it caused a couple of partially torn rotator cuff tendons. I did PT and have good movement. Ortho said he would see me in 5 years to do surgery.

    Today I'm 65 and retired and have re-discovered surfing. It has really changed my approach to riding. I know that if I crash wrong, I'm out of the water. I ride not to crash and sometimes walk where I wouldn't have. It is what it is, but I still enjoy it.

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  4. #104
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    A 50+ rider recently died over here.

    Broke his neck on a jump and died after a few days in hospital.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  5. #105
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    I fell over while dismounting the other day! I had noticed the rear tire was low. Pulled to the side of the trail to get off the bike, set my right foot down, twisted my ankle and down I went like a sack of potatoes. Thankfully nobody was watching. I laid there and laughed.

  6. #106
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    Low speed front wheel lockup on some cow rutted section when I looked another direction.

    Also went over like a sack of potatoes, no cat like reaction.

    Luckily my camelbak broke the impact on my my side back! but one hell of a charlie horse on the thigh that lasted a couple days.

    Slow speed no momentum always dangerous!

    Got off lucky.

  7. #107
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    I don't think it makes any difference what other people say or do. You will ride the way you ride and there is nothing you or anyone else can do about it. If you're inclined to take risks you will do that, no matter how much you try to convince yourself not to beforehand.

    I often stop and eye up a feature and will often walk bigger ones. What makes me walk is not so much thinking that I can't ride it but when he consequences of failing are very bad. So I might walk a steep rocky drop I know I could probably ride because falling is virtually guaranteed to be serous.

    Having said that, I don't worry about crashing and go over the bars regularly. You can't ride a bike off road and not crash and I fully expect to break something eventually. Actually, I got x-rays of my left wrist taken last week and I'm waiting for the results so maybe I have already ;0)

  8. #108
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    Rolled an 18" ledge too slow about two weeks ago. Knew it was gonna be a bad moment too late to bail tried to ride it out went down on left side and landed hard on left shoulder blade felt a very sharp pain in my back and chest. No broken ribs but I think I tore my rib cartilage. Just starting not to hurt now. Healing sucks at 55.

  9. #109
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    Mild separation of my right shoulder doing some downhill last weekend at our local ski mountain. Not a big fan of downhill and was reluctant to go because of the risk, should have listened to that inner voice. Like others have said, I just don't take risks I once did. I have come to this sport late, used to road race motorcycles and have had my fill of the "speed" thing. I do this for fun and have no shame in walking something I know I can ride if the consequences look to great, (54 years old BTW).

  10. #110
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    I reckon that if I don't crash from time to time, I'm really not having enough fun.

    I figure on a minor spill like a wash out and slide on average every other ride (esp. in the wet) and a biggie like an endo on rocks (or a high speed bar clip, that being my only ER trip in the last few years) maybe once a year.

    So the real question is not how to avoid crashing, but how to survive it at 57? Lots of strength training - weights, etc. so that you can do something pro-active about the impact and then keep your reactions sharp so you can do something fast enough.

    That's my philosophy anyway - hope it helps someone :-)

  11. #111
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    I was close to the end of Town Run trail in Indianapolis today thinking to myself that this has been a great run. Then a tree stump jumped out in front of me and suddenly I'm doing a superman impression over the handlebars. At least nobody saw me.
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    Last edited by Lonn; 1 Week Ago at 11:45 AM.

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lonn View Post
    I was close to the end of Town Run trail in Indianapolis today thinking to myself that this has been a great run. Then a tree stump jumped out in front of me and suddenly I'm doing a superman impression over the handlebars. At least moody saw me.
    Old People Crashes-img_8175.jpg
    Except for the camera
    "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." -Douglas Adams.

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankout View Post
    Here is Chazpat on the 3rd lap of a recent 6 hour race...


    Attachment 1125256
    Fess up. Admit he beat you
    DAMN THE MUD, FULL SPEED AHEAD!!

  14. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by OlMarin View Post
    Fess up. Admit he beat you
    Well that's a bit of a blast from the past. Front end washed out and I couldn't save it.
    "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." -Douglas Adams.

  15. #115
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    I took too many years off the bikes. When I got back on I admit reaching for a water bottle made the bicycle weave (not me, the bike DAMMIT!!). It hurts more and the pain lasts longer when I crash than when I was in my 20's
    DAMN THE MUD, FULL SPEED AHEAD!!

  16. #116
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    I sometimes feel like I need to practice falling more. I seem to lawn dart more now than when younger when I tucked and rolled better. Also like martial arts and contact sports I think we handle regular impacts better when they are more frequent. But at what risk???

  17. #117
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    I crashed twice on the same ride two weeks ago, and the first time I was not even riding. i went out to a section of the local trail that I had not been on for some time. About 1/2 mile down, there is a very narrow stretch, very uneven, with trees and bushes on both sides that overgrow the trail. The last time I was there, I could ride through the overgrowth by ducking my head. This time, no dice. I dismounted, and not paying attention to where I put my foot, I stepped on a ledge of dry clay that broke off, foot went straight down, lost footing, knee and forearm hit the rocks. I was not even moving! What a yutz. A lot of scrapes and gouges.

    Splashed some water from the bottle on it, and continued on. Another 1/2 mile, and a nice little drop to the highway underpass, then a sharp, steep but short uphill, and when I came round the bend, hit sand, and fell again into rocks because the front tire slid out. Hit the exact same spot on forearm and leg! This time, got a nice bruise on my right butt cheek as a bonus. I continued to ride another 8 miles or so until I got to the beach front, and a local coffee shop, where I was able to clean up. Gotta buy some wipes in a foil pack.

    I got back into riding 5 years ago, and had never ridden mountain bikes, as I grew up and lived in Miami, where there ain't a lot of that. Since moving here, I have really gotten into it as I live two miles from the INT, and there is plenty of great riding within an hour to 2 hours of my home by car as well. I have fallen quite a few times, and gone OTB at least 7 times, including one very nasty concussion (yes, was wearing a helmet, and it buckled and cracked on impact).

    What I have learned. One, I can still take a good hit, but I DON'T WANT TO! Second, I have completely rethought my tire pressures, and while I am still not 100% where I want to be, lowering pressures (I ride w/tubes), has given me much more control. Third, I changed my handlebar to a 760 mm Spank Vibracore, and put on SQ Lab grips. Those small changes have made a huge difference in control and stability. I am riding harder and better than ever, and I still push myself and take on new challenges. That said, I am more cautious in that if I have any doubt about a new trail, I stop and take a good long look, and will walk it up or down to get a feel for it, and am not afraid to pass on a trail section if I don't have the confidence. It's a fine line between challenging myself and being stupid, and so far so good.

    Finally, my wife flips out every time she sees blood, and I don't want to deal with it. Let's put it this way, the blood, scrapes, bruises, cuts, etc., hurt her more than they hurt me, and it makes the whole thing that much worse when I come home.

    At age 61, I plan on riding for many more years to come, and I would rather be a little cautious than stupid. I also ride a lot on my own, and don't want to be out there on the trail all messed up by my lonesome. My .02.
    Last edited by Galeforce5; 1 Week Ago at 09:11 AM.

  18. #118
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    At 72 and still ok, a word of caution. Keep your wheels on the ground.

    That's unless you're willing to accept that one bad landing may mean an end to your cycling and mobility, full stop.

    I've seen too many riding mates lose their capacities from jumps and drops gone wrong. The odds are with you if you're skilled, but once you're past 50 your chances of permanently damaging yourself rise dramatically.

    A buzz is for seconds, but a maiming is for life.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  19. #119
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    I had an almost crash not too long back. Had my rack trunk, getting a gallon of milk. When I got to the store I found a slip from the post office I'd forgotten about. Got the milk, went to USPS, got the package. Box of 500 insulin syringes from the VA. I always carry a strap, box is light but a bit bulky. Strapped it on top. Stayed in place fine. But see, coming home there's this downhill, train tracks at the bottom. I can get some nice air if I'm going fast enough. But I run bobbed fenders. AND I forgot about the load. Hit the ground, box went flying and the strap got between the rear fender and the wheel. Locked up the wheel which brought me to a bit of an abrupt stop. I managed to stay upright and the rack trunk and milk stayed in place. Coulda been a lot worse.
    I admit, I sometimes forget I'm an old f@*t
    DAMN THE MUD, FULL SPEED AHEAD!!

  20. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    At 72 and still ok, a word of caution. Keep your wheels on the ground.
    This is probably very good advice. I should follow it. I really should.

  21. #121
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    Off topic

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    This is probably very good advice. I should follow it. I really should.
    Hey, if you fancy a bit of exercise next weekend, a few of us are riding from Achnasheen over the Bealach na Ba to Applecross, camping there overnight, then heading back to Achnasheen via Sheildaig and Kinlochewe.

    Road ride, pace leisurely tourist but there a few wee climbs involved. Retro theme, but not compulsory.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Hey, if you fancy a bit of exercise next weekend, a few of us are riding from Achnasheen over the Bealach na Ba to Applecross...
    Thanks for the invite :0) Already made plans for next Saturday but keep asking, might take you up on one.

    You know how far away I am from there, right? ;0)

  23. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Thanks for the invite :0) Already made plans for next Saturday but keep asking, might take you up on one.

    You know how far away I am from there, right? ;0)
    There may be someone coming up from London by train (hence Achnasheen because it has a station).
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  24. #124
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    Funny discussion with my boss last Friday, seemed to fit the forum. I'm getting ready for a 75 mile gravel ride and he asks
    "Didn't you just break your elbow?"
    - "That was the end of April."
    "Aren't you worried that you'll fall during the Gravel race?"
    - "Nope, never crashed during a race yet."
    "Yeah, but this is a really long race and it's on gravel."
    - "Yup, ridden farther, ridden on worse terrain, last bad crash was when I was 11."
    "Sure, but you're getting older and what if you're elbow gets shattered again?"
    - "Well, they make replacements for most joints and prosthetics for every limb, besides, there's no waiting list for artificial knees or shoulders."

    Then I tell him my mantra about expensive bikes verses cheap open heart surgery and he nods and says
    "Yup, our deductible for my surgery would buy the three nicest bikes in town."

    He certainly has no idea how much the three nicest bikes in our city cost
    The most expensive bike in the world is still cheaper than the cheapest open heart surgery.

  25. #125
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    54 year old fart here. I really want/need to shed some pounds to see what I really can or can't do with my bike.

    No real crashes yet, so I have been patient and cautious to some degree. Here is a clip of me simply falling over into a creek. I focused on one particular flat wet rock too much and that's where the problem began. I bruised my thigh but did not feel that until the day or two after the fall.

    My buddies have gotten a big laugh out of this. https://youtu.be/XNwoYEEkXEA

  26. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by J-5 View Post
    My buddies have gotten a big laugh out of this.
    Brave of you to share it. I would've burned the evidence!

  27. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Brave of you to share it. I would've burned the evidence!
    Haaaaaaaaa. I know right. A buddy of mine came out from the desert for a visit. He asked if he could see it and I knew if I showed him the clip, the barely can breath laughter would be endless; and it was.

    Giggled like the 14 year olds we used to be. It was shamefully funny.

  28. #128
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    I'm thankful that we didn't have portable cameras when I was a kid.

    A friend and I were down the glen one day and had to cross the burn (small river). This usually involved walking along the bank until you found a tree fallen across or something. This day we found a suitable tree but it was quite narrow. I was walking across the trunk holding onto a branch above my head when I let the branch slip out of my hands and it sprung out of reach. I was now balanced sideways on the narrow trunk on the middle of the burn.

    The water wasn't even that deep but I was determined I wasn't getting my feet wet. As I started to wobble I knelt down and grabbed the trunk with my hands. Almost immediately I swung backwards around it and landed on my back in the burn. Couldn't have gotten more wet if I'd fallen in a swimming pool. If I'd just jumped off the branch only my feet would've gotten wet ;0)

    Do you have a dropper post? If so, drop it as you come up to things like this stream as you'll just step off the bike rather than falling over.

  29. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    I'm thankful that we didn't have portable cameras when I was a kid.

    A friend and I were down the glen one day and had to cross the burn (small river). This usually involved walking along the bank until you found a tree fallen across or something. This day we found a suitable tree but it was quite narrow. I was walking across the trunk holding onto a branch above my head when I let the branch slip out of my hands and it sprung out of reach. I was now balanced sideways on the narrow trunk on the middle of the burn.

    The water wasn't even that deep but I was determined I wasn't getting my feet wet. As I started to wobble I knelt down and grabbed the trunk with my hands. Almost immediately I swung backwards around it and landed on my back in the burn. Couldn't have gotten more wet if I'd fallen in a swimming pool. If I'd just jumped off the branch only my feet would've gotten wet ;0)

    Do you have a dropper post? If so, drop it as you come up to things like this stream as you'll just step off the bike rather than falling over.
    Oh yes. I do have one and immediately knew I should have dropped my saddle (as soon as I put my foot down and touched nothing but the top of the water).

    Great pointer/reminder!

  30. #130
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    After a year of riding, I had my first real crash today. Clipped a tiny twig of a tree at speed on a relatively easy part of the trail. Needless to say, my bike stopped dead, but I did not. My shoulder bore the brunt of the impact, I landed in the middle of the dry-as-a-bone trail which of course provided zero "give". I've had other moments in the past, but nothing I couldn't bail out of. There was no mitigating this crash, I didn't even see it coming.

    I have some trail rash going down my right side, no biggie there. I may have bruised a rib or something as it hurts when I breathe in deep, but overall not *too* painful, we'll see how I feel tomorrow.

    The only damage to the bike was crooked handle bars and some scratches. I likely would've lost a brake lever had I not read on this forum to keep brakes/shifters loose enough to move in case of a crash.

    My real concern is how long will I be off the bike. Kinda crazy how quickly this sport gets its hooks in you.

  31. #131
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    My legs never fully healed, I have pedal bites front and back in various stages of scabbing. I can't imagine what people think of my legs when I go out in public wearing shorts.

    This summer I focused on epic rides, endurance, extreme climbs, so less super tech, more like xc with moderate tech.

    No serious spills since moving to NV, though I did get stitches for a machete incident

    New bike build next weekend, so I'm sure a crash is in my near future.

  32. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajmtb View Post
    After a year of riding, I had my first real crash today.
    Get used to the idea. If you do anything at all interesting on a bicycle, you will crash sometimes.

  33. #133
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    I'm not "old people" at 46. Most people are surprised I'm that old, and I'm actually in great shape, but it doesn't take much to cripple me up. I don't even have to crash.
    Been down again since this weekend. Very rough ride squaring up on damp roots and rocks to avoid sliding had me taking lines I wouldn't normally take on a hardtail. Damaged derailleur-dang it, back/pelvis out of alignment(chronic condition from old injury), couldn't stand up straight for a couple of days, knots from hip to shoulder, muscle spasms and all that good stuff.
    Three visits to the chiropractor(who wants me to get a FS bike and back to deadlifting) to get my sacrum back in place, 4 days at 3x per day on the inversion table plus a lot of stretching in between, and I'm back to "normal". Paying to play is nothing new here, and so the cycle begins again.

    For all you genuinely ancient jokers, I highly recommend trying an inversion table to anyone with back problems who doesn't have blood pressure issues or physical damage that would prevent using one. Mine has been life-changing as far as keeping my spine aligned and preventing overall stiffness, though it can't do anything about my pelvis getting knocked out of place.
    Core exercises(less problems the more consistent I am), and the homeopathic remedy Arnica for bruising and trauma are also high on my list. I did have a crash, recently, where I burped a tire and OTB'd with my hand taking the brunt of the impact. I could practically watch the bruising fade away when the arnica kicked in.
    Pretty scary going back and forth between fully functional and not, but it sure beats being "not" all the time. This weekend I couldn't stand up straight, but would have been right back to riding trails today or in the morning if I weren't working overtime and having to catch up on the yard work I couldn't do early in the week like usual.

    Sedentary speeds, though? Negative. I just really got into this the last couple years. Steadily advancing skills, getting faster and faster, and setting new PRs almost every time I ride. Can't think of anything I'd rather do, so it'd take an awful lot to make me give it up, and I have no intention of slowing down. I just try to be careful, and use some common sense, by systematically increasing the intensity of my rides and gradually incorporating the skills that I work on off the trail(I practice my manuals, wheelies, small drops and tight cornering at home-neighbors probably think I've bumped my head!).
    This is some really fun stuff

  34. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Get used to the idea. If you do anything at all interesting on a bicycle, you will crash sometimes.
    Yep, I knew it was only a matter of time. My colleague at work says that I'm too old (37) to be doing such activities, but I'm on the younger side when compared to most of the guys I see on the trail.

    It's been over 3 days since the crash, feel better but definitely not ride ready yet. Mornings are the worst.

    Quote Originally Posted by OwenM View Post
    For all you genuinely ancient jokers, I highly recommend trying an inversion table
    Thank you for the recommendation. I have been suffering with a lower back injury for about a year and a half now, seems to be disc related. How often/how long do you use the table?

  35. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajmtb View Post
    Yep, I knew it was only a matter of time. My colleague at work says that I'm too old (37) to be doing such activities..
    Good grief!

    It's amazing the way some people just give up on being alive! When you're a kid, every one looks much the same but by the time you get to my age, fifty, it's a different story. Some folk are still fit and active while others look like old men or women. My boss and my mother are the same age. My boss comes into work every day and puts a shift in. My mother is bent double, can't get up if she ends up on the floor and never leaves the house. There is no medical reason why she's effectively disabled, she's just spent her life sitting watching TV.

    I know I could get hurt on a mountain bike but I'll take the risk!

  36. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajmtb View Post
    How often/how long do you use the table?
    As needed. That may mean once every few days, or several times in one day. It usually doesn't take much, though, just a few minutes. Getting on it multiple times generally means it's not going to work, because it's treating the symptom(spine getting out of alignment), not the cause(pelvis has a permanent twist, but gets knocked out of place from impacts, which practically cripples me). That's when I head to the chiropractor. When I bought it, I was having lots of problems, and going to the chiro and a massage therapist regularly. Got a Teeter EP-970, which is one of the more expensive ones at $400, but it paid for itself quickly, since my insurance coverage for chiropractic care is only $400 per year after a $200 deductible. I've gone *months* at a time without needing the chiropractor, since.
    Usually get on it before and after bike rides or lifting weights whether I feel the need to or not.

  37. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Good grief!

    It's amazing the way some people just give up on being alive! When you're a kid, every one looks much the same but by the time you get to my age, fifty, it's a different story. Some folk are still fit and active while others look like old men or women. My boss and my mother are the same age. My boss comes into work every day and puts a shift in. My mother is bent double, can't get up if she ends up on the floor and never leaves the house. There is no medical reason why she's effectively disabled, she's just spent her life sitting watching TV.

    I know I could get hurt on a mountain bike but I'll take the risk!
    The funny thing is that the effects of poor diet and exercise are reversible!!!!! even after decades. Bones mend, bruises go away, rashes heal.

    But I do hear the "discretion is the better part of valor" on HOW much of a child gets released.

  38. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by milliesand View Post
    The funny thing is that the effects of poor diet and exercise are reversible!!!!!
    I spent a good 10 years living a sedentary lifestyle, and the vast majority of that time I basically felt like crap all the time. I had very low energy, little motivation, and my overall mental state wasn't great. I had known for some time that exercise can help issues like these, but I could never get motivated to go for a run or hit the gym. I stumbled on a MTB YouTube channel and thought that it may be something I could get into, so I bought a bike.

    The bike sat in my garage for a month, then one day I decided to give it a go. One lap around one of my local trails and I was hooked. Those issues I was having slowly started to ease, and while I'm not cured, I'm in far better shape (mentally and physically) than I was before.

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