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Thread: The big ride

  1. #1
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    The big ride

    I just turned 50 late last year and it's got me thinking that I may not have the stamina left for a lot of big rides in the near future.

    This summer, I plan to ride the Lord of the Squirrels trail in Whistler. I've read that it's around 5,000' of climbing and an all-day effort.

    I can see the window closing for the big mountain rides that I love so much and really want to get this one in before it's too late. There are some others too in the Cascades that I'd like to knock off while I can.

    Is anyone else trying to fit it big rides before age diminishes the ability to do so?
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

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    Don't overthink it. Just do.

    You'll be able to keep doing big rides for a lot longer.

    (Remember the message in the joke about the young bull, the old bull, and the herd of cows in the next field.)
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    I was 62 when I did a ride with 12,000' of climbing. Right now, I think it's more interest/motivation that's lacking rather than fitness/stamina.
    Do the math.

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    Yep, just ride. I'm in my later 50s and climb steeps. At the beginning of the season things are hard, as I ride more I get into better shape, noticeable improvement. Not to old to ride or improve.

  5. #5
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    Age is just a number.
    The only one holding you back is you!
    Granted you might not ride as fast as you use to but who does.
    I walk parts I use to ride if I don't think it is worth it or it is early season.
    I use to be one of those that had to ride it or at least attempt it all but now I no issue walking it......I still got there just like everyone else.
    I ride with a guy who is 69 and sometimes he out climbs me......that more depressing then getting beat up a hill by a young rider. LOL

    Cheers,
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    I am 57 and rode Lord Of The Squirrels (LOTS) twice this year. I made it up faster than most of the other people on the trail who where much younger than me. My friend put a lot of youngsters to shame on that trail as well, and she is only 60 years old! Keep riding, have fun, and don't start thinking about quitting riding. You have LOTS (see what I did there?) of years ahead of you!

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    Rock on.

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    I turned 50 late last year too. On my 50th birthday I did a 6+ hour ride in 100F heat, so I know I can still ride hard but I've found I've become more interested in shorter 1 hour rides with lots of payout rather than long rides simply for the sake of pedaling. If I'm visiting a different locale then I'm all for an epic route but for my local trails that I've ridden a thousand times I'd rather cut to the chase and hit the fun stuff, then go do something else with the rest of my day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skooks View Post
    I am 57 and rode Lord Of The Squirrels (LOTS) twice this year. I made it up faster than most of the other people on the trail who where much younger than me. My friend put a lot of youngsters to shame on that trail as well, and she is only 60 years old! Keep riding, have fun, and don't start thinking about quitting riding. You have LOTS (see what I did there?) of years ahead of you!
    This great to hear!

    I wouldn't consider giving up riding until I just can't get out of bed anymore. I'm just worried that I won't be able to do the really big climbs anymore.

    I'll just keep at it and not worry so much. Thanks for the encouragement guys.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

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    We're also going up to Whistler this year and plan on riding LOTS. I'm 53 and two other guys are 57 (our fastest climber) and 58....along with two youngsters in their 40's. I'm going to throw a 28 tooth chainring on the 5010 and spin, spin, spin. Speed isn't a factor.
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    The only thing stopping your endurance at 50+ is your ability to keep riding and training. I'm early 50's and can hang tough on long races. While I'm not necessarily faster than I was 15 years or so ago, I think I'm much smarter in my training, nutrition and recovery.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

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    Too old?

    Nah, you just need to take more time, train up, avoid pushing big gears, walk to avoid blowing up, hydrate and eat right.

    I spent the summer doing epics up the Carson range and around the Lake, lots of all day rides with big vertical. Bike set up and conditioning are key, you need the gears and legs to spin the vertical.

    At some point I'll get some assist, but not until I can't do what I want to do (within reason).

    Both my bikes are geared for climbing: 11sp, 26t elliptical x 11-46. I'll get an 12sp 10-50 when the prices drop. Don't need tall gears for going downhill and who cares about how fast you can ride on gravel and pavement

    Quote Originally Posted by Curveball View Post
    I just turned 50 late last year and it's got me thinking that I may not have the stamina left for a lot of big rides in the near future.

    This summer, I plan to ride the Lord of the Squirrels trail in Whistler. I've read that it's around 5,000' of climbing and an all-day effort.

    I can see the window closing for the big mountain rides that I love so much and really want to get this one in before it's too late. There are some others too in the Cascades that I'd like to knock off while I can.

    Is anyone else trying to fit it big rides before age diminishes the ability to do so?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Too old?

    Nah, you just need to take more time, train up, avoid pushing big gears,

    Both my bikes are geared for climbing: 11sp, 26t elliptical x 11-46. I'll get an 12sp 10-50 when the prices drop. Don't need tall gears for going downhill and who cares about how fast you can ride on gravel and pavement
    I rode Lord of the Squirrels late last year. The up track was in great shape, the decent, not so good! I rode with the 28t by 9 x 46 and wish I had a 26 chainring for a few sections! I am going to try and find a 26 chainring for my e-thirteeen crank! Not sure if you know about how the good the riding is in Squamish, but make sure you plan that into your trip!
    Denis

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    I think you meant to quote someone else

    I just moved to NV last year from northeastern WA. We routinely went north to ride in CANADA, really enjoy riding on the coast.

    But alas, the cold and dark sent me packing, so now i ride sagebrush, lava, granite, and sand, all under 12 months of blue skies

    You Canucks need to come south and sample the Sierras, it’d give you a chance to thaw out and get some color on your cheeks.

    Quote Originally Posted by denyski View Post
    I rode Lord of the Squirrels late last year. The up track was in great shape, the decent, not so good! I rode with the 28t by 9 x 46 and wish I had a 26 chainring for a few sections! I am going to try and find a 26 chainring for my e-thirteeen crank! Not sure if you know about how the good the riding is in Squamish, but make sure you plan that into your trip!
    Denis

  15. #15
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    I think you gotta do what fits best with your typical discipline.
    IOW be safe. Build up to that level of fitness and stick with it. Do so and you'll be riding big rides for a long time and I hope it isn't a big downer as it may get tougher and tougher.

    I say this because I'm more the weekend warrior and that's who the hospitals and Dr offices see .
    I know this about myself so I do play it safe and thus I'm 'afraid' to go out and go big. My time, family stuff and energy better fits my routine of rides and days as is and I'm pleased that I have it working this way.

    If I really wanted to, I'd have to build up to the big rides, big miles or big climbs but my recreation comes in smaller doses and I don't have that yearn to go and accomplish at that level.
    ** I think it's great for those that do and certainly a fitness / longevity pay-off !

    My big ride was at birthday 54, I'm now 56. Seemed like a good time to go and do a 54 mile ride but that wasn't big climbs. I found a simple path that probably runs from 7400 feet on down to 6600 or so and I figured a north route of 17 out and back, then south 10 and back. Aside from the fun of being on a bike seat for hours upon hours it was smooth and easy.

    Make plans to do those fun things and big accomplishments and just keep it 'real' in the common sense side of the equation for your health and safety !
    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    I just moved to NV last year from northeastern WA. We routinely went north to ride in CANADA, really enjoy riding on the coast.

    But alas, the cold and dark sent me packing, so now i ride sagebrush, lava, granite, and sand, all under 12 months of blue skies

    You Canucks need to come south and sample the Sierras, it’d give you a chance to thaw out and get some color on your cheeks.
    Well, just remember you don't rust and you will get bored with all that sagebrush, lava, granite, sand and blue skies.........
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    Quote Originally Posted by denyski View Post
    I rode Lord of the Squirrels late last year. The up track was in great shape, the decent, not so good! I rode with the 28t by 9 x 46 and wish I had a 26 chainring for a few sections! I am going to try and find a 26 chainring for my e-thirteeen crank! Not sure if you know about how the good the riding is in Squamish, but make sure you plan that into your trip!
    Denis
    Half-nelson in Squamish is definitely in the plan. I haven't ridden Squamish yet, but we'll hit it this year.

    We'll do the bike park a couple of days. Cheakamus Lake and some of the other XC trails are also on the agenda. My wife and son can't do the Into the Mystic climb and so they'll likely hike while I do my ride. Are there any restaurants or places for them to hang out somewhere near the trailhead?

    I figure I have about 10 more years of being able to do big climbs and then who knows what shape I'll be in.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  18. #18
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    My wife started at 58 (three kids and taking care of me). This last summer, for her 64th birthday, she climbed from 7000 feet to almost 10,000 feet in an 18.7 mile round trip.
    I expect she'll want to top that for her 65th birthday.

    "Just do it".

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curveball View Post
    I just turned 50 late last year and it's got me thinking that I may not have the stamina left for a lot of big rides in the near future.

    This summer, I plan to ride the Lord of the Squirrels trail in Whistler. I've read that it's around 5,000' of climbing and an all-day effort.

    I can see the window closing for the big mountain rides that I love so much and really want to get this one in before it's too late. There are some others too in the Cascades that I'd like to knock off while I can.

    Is anyone else trying to fit it big rides before age diminishes the ability to do so?
    50 is still relatively young, but the time will come when the list of things you cannot do gets longer and longer. What to do about it? I think a couple of things that are somewhat complementary.

    First, don't be delusional. You are good at it, I think, just the fact that you ask the question shows that you are not living in the la-la-land of "50 is the new 30". But I think it is important to really recognize the limitations of our biology: no matter what one does it is very unlikely that he or she will be riding to 100. A very large majority cannot do much in their seventies, just look at the pool with the age distribution for this forum The Official 50 + Years Old Age Poll .....thread.

    Second, and more important, forget what you could do in the past, or what you think you cannot do any longer. Enjoy every ride as if it was your first!

    You get tired sooner? Take a brake and look at the flowers. Enjoy the sight of the younger riders passing by. Marvel at the fact that you are still doing it, marvel at your luck: you are still alive! So many of us die before 50 ...

    Love your life now, do not regret the past!
    Last edited by Davide; 01-14-2018 at 07:08 PM.

  20. #20
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    I can't hardly fathom those climbs I see posted by so many.

    Sunday afternoon I was out with friends riding some open space area at 6000 to 6600 ft for a few hours. I really felt the ups and downs and had what thought of as an impressive ride and work out. I suppose if tracking it properly, I get credit for the number of ups and downs as cumualtive elevation ?

    I mean 600 feet is really nothing at all when I see it expressed this way. The rider leading the way said our ride was about 75% climbing. It sure felt that way.

    I'm still coughing and weezing a bit from a cold and was down a week ago quite ill with fever / chills so I know I'm really in recoup mode but I don't beleive I'll ever come close to big climbs I see posted at times.
    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

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    I have a friend who's 55 and an amatour athlete. He's been cycling for years but thought he'd try track cycling. He's only been doing it for a couple of years but he's on the top step in races! I find it amazing but it just goes to show what you can do.

    Here in the UK there is a game show on TV called Total Wipeout, a crazy obstacle course. A few years ago the guy who won it was 65! Beat folk a third of his age. Do it until you can't do it.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by bachman1961 View Post
    I suppose if tracking it properly, I get credit for the number of ups and downs as cumualtive elevation ?
    Oh, hell yeah!

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    Oh, hell yeah!
    ha ha Good to know, Thank you.

    600 feet don't sound like much but I guess if I did a lot of up's and downs and say I climbed 80 feet 12 or 15 times, that might sound better.
    I use the freebie version of mapmyrun sometimes but I don't believe it tracks elevation in that manor. Is there a simple to use/understand app out there for this kind of thing ?
    Free ?

    It would be nice to know what I can do in that respect.

    We have a newer trail called Ring the Peak and I think a few of us will make a plan for a liesurely two night bike/camp adventure, 100k -ish I think.
    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davide View Post
    ...First, don't be delusional. You are good at it, I think, just the fact that you ask the question shows that you are not living in the la-la-land of "50 is the new 30". But I think it is important to really recognize the limitations of our biology: no matter what one does it is very unlikely that he or she will be riding to 100. A very large majority cannot do much in their seventies, just look at the pool with the age distribution for this forum The Official 50 + Years Old Age Poll .....thread.

    Second, and more important, forget what you could do in the past, or what you think you cannot do any longer. Enjoy every ride as if it was your first!...
    Pretty much it.

    I'd add remove expectations and just do.

    Don't worry about speed comparisons with your younger self or other people.

    Distance is still no barrier. That you can do, it just takes longer.
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  25. #25
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    About a dozen years ago when I was in my mid-40's, a friend and I decided we should do the "Durango Death Ride", or as my wife called it "The Stupid Ride". It was an unsupported 225 mile road ride, with 17,000 feet of climbing -- Durango to Silverton to Ouray to Ridway, past Telluride, to Dolores and then back into Durango. There are 6 mountain legitimate mountain passes/lengthy climgs in there, 4 of them topping out at over 10,000 feet. At the time, it really never crossed either of our minds that we would fail -- and we didn't. It was a big day, but we just went and knocked it off. I've had opportunity to drive sections of that route since then, and the last couple of times my thought was "how the hell did we ever pull that off?". I've stayed fit and active since then, training in much the same way as I did back then, but I can't imagine just going off and doing doing something that big in the cavalier way I did then.

    But between thinking about how I've become (comparatively) scared of the big ride and inspired by this thread, I decided to up the ante a bit this year. I have a race plan of the Gunnison Growler, Laramie Enduro Epic, Steamboat Stinger and our local mid-week race series. The training will require some nice long rides -- road and gravel centuries in the spring, and weekly 4 to 5 hour mtb wanders in local hills once the snow clears. I felt like I'd turned an emotional corner with respect to big rides and long days, and not in a good way -- hope this gets me back on track. That, or it will kill any confidence I have left...
    "The plural of anecdote is not data." -- Attributed to various people in a variety of forms, but always worth remembering...

  26. #26
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    Curveball, I'm 57 and do a lot of big climbs in the Cascades. Most of the guys I ride with are younger than me, some in their mid-30's, yet I am usually the first one to the top of the climbs. Of course when it comes to going down I'm usually one of the last to the bottom (which I chalk up more to wisdom than lack of skill ).

    My "secret" is for the last ten years I ridden my bike to work everyday logging ~30 miles/~2000 feet of ascent round-trip.

    I occasionally ride with a friend in his mid-60's who rides more than me and I have trouble keeping up with him. So the message is just keep pushing the pedals and you'll be fine.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ptor View Post
    About a dozen years ago when I was in my mid-40's, a friend and I decided we should do the "Durango Death Ride", or as my wife called it "The Stupid Ride". It was an unsupported 225 mile road ride, with 17,000 feet of climbing -- Durango to Silverton to Ouray to Ridway, past Telluride, to Dolores and then back into Durango. There are 6 mountain legitimate mountain passes/lengthy climgs in there, 4 of them topping out at over 10,000 feet. At the time, it really never crossed either of our minds that we would fail -- and we didn't. It was a big day, but we just went and knocked it off. I've had opportunity to drive sections of that route since then, and the last couple of times my thought was "how the hell did we ever pull that off?". I've stayed fit and active since then, training in much the same way as I did back then, but I can't imagine just going off and doing doing something that big in the cavalier way I did then.

    But between thinking about how I've become (comparatively) scared of the big ride and inspired by this thread, I decided to up the ante a bit this year. I have a race plan of the Gunnison Growler, Laramie Enduro Epic, Steamboat Stinger and our local mid-week race series. The training will require some nice long rides -- road and gravel centuries in the spring, and weekly 4 to 5 hour mtb wanders in local hills once the snow clears. I felt like I'd turned an emotional corner with respect to big rides and long days, and not in a good way -- hope this gets me back on track. That, or it will kill any confidence I have left...
    Very cool that you're going for it on big rides!

    This might be a good thread for posting about our 50+ accomplishments to inspire other older riders.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ptor View Post
    About a dozen years ago when I was in my mid-40's, a friend and I decided we should do the "Durango Death Ride", or as my wife called it "The Stupid Ride". It was an unsupported 225 mile road ride, with 17,000 feet of climbing -- Durango to Silverton to Ouray to Ridway, past Telluride, to Dolores and then back into Durango. There are 6 mountain legitimate mountain passes/lengthy climgs in there, 4 of them topping out at over 10,000 feet.
    How do you get the resources or calculate the total climb elevations on something like that or is there a souce for that kind of info ?

    I can see there is really no way for me to know of my fitness or expectations until I start tracking that kind of stuff, at least some sort of baseline.

    As of now and previous rides/history, I just relate what/where I ride locally to others here as a gauge of some sort for comaprison but I can see this information as a very healthy and forward-thinking approach.
    T Y
    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by bachman1961
    How do you get the resources or calculate the total climb elevations on something like that or is there a souce for that kind of info ?
    I did the ride well before Strava (we didn't even have a cell phone), but that would get you close to what reality is for total climbing. I use Strava now and it seems like it gets both distance and climbing pretty close. At the time, there were a couple of published accounts of the ride and we choose to believe the one that said 25,000 feet of climbing! But now there's several sites that report (only) 16,500. I think Bike Maps, Cycling Workout, Biking Routes | MapMyRide will get you the sort of information you might want for a lot of different routes that you have or think you might ride.
    "The plural of anecdote is not data." -- Attributed to various people in a variety of forms, but always worth remembering...

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by bachman1961 View Post
    How do you get the resources or calculate the total climb elevations on something like that or is there a souce for that kind of info ?

    I can see there is really no way for me to know of my fitness or expectations until I start tracking that kind of stuff, at least some sort of baseline.

    As of now and previous rides/history, I just relate what/where I ride locally to others here as a gauge of some sort for comaprison but I can see this information as a very healthy and forward-thinking approach.
    T Y
    A Garmin bike computer will calculate total climb/descent for you. Most of their newer models actually have a barometric altimeter so they are pretty accurate.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by bachman1961 View Post
    How do you get the resources or calculate the total climb elevations on something like that or is there a souce for that kind of info ?

    I can see there is really no way for me to know of my fitness or expectations until I start tracking that kind of stuff, at least some sort of baseline.

    As of now and previous rides/history, I just relate what/where I ride locally to others here as a gauge of some sort for comaprison but I can see this information as a very healthy and forward-thinking approach.
    T Y
    Just sign up for Strava its free, you don't have to go premium, and you can track your stuff.

    It is an extra motivator as well. All the negative stuff said about it here, is all rider based..IMHumbleO.
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  32. #32
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    Thanks for the input guys.
    It'll be nice to at least see what I'm doing on current rides, monthly or any tally of specifics. I'd like the freedom to make bigger ride plans knowing what I'm up for or needing to prepare for.

    Take a look at this link to interpret the stretch of trail and elevations posted for this 3.8 section. Do you add the ups and downs for a cumulative total ?
    Trail Segment 1-1a | Friends of the Peak


    I can see two big climbs are 6470 - 7250 or so and then 6980 - 7350.
    This is part of a 60 mile loop that might be a fun 2 n - 3 day event for a few of us. It starts around 6400 and the highest point is 11,300.
    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

  33. #33
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    Every time I see this thread title I think it's going to be stories about "The Big Ride" to the other side..... maybe because it's in the 50+
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