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  1. #1
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    Felt RXC Hardtail

    I bought my first "real" mountain bike a few days ago. Had an ironhorse hardtail that was stolen from me about 6 years ago, but finally am getting back into the sport. This one had been ridden only on the road with the fork locked out for about 500 miles when I bought it from the original owner, who kept it in great shape. He also threw in some shoes that fit me, extra crank bro's egg beater cleats, and several tubes with slime. I've ridden it on trails twice now in the two days I've owned it and have had a blast. It saw its first creek and also its first crash yesterday! I have a few questions:

    1. Where can I find a manual for this bike?
    2. The fork: Manitou Axel Elite with I believe 80mm of travel... How long can I expect to use this one before I'll want to upgrade? And, if I'm riding cross country, single-track trails and not dropping off ledges or anything like that, what kind of fork should I be looking for? Suggestions?
    3. Tell me about this frame. I knew it was a nice frame for what I'd consider myself to be an entry-intermediate level rider, and the carbon seat stays look to be in immaculate condition. Is this a frame I could keep around for a long time if I take care of it and the carbon pieces at least are kept intact?
    4. Components: looks to be a mixture of Shimano deore and XT groupings. What can I expect to wear out first?
    5. What are indicia of tires that are worn out? They look pretty good, but the middle tread on the rear tire looks more worn that that of the front tire.
    6. Disc Brakes: Do I really need them? That involves getting new wheels, right?
    7. Anything else I should know about this bike?
    8. Did I do well with $450?
    9. Any recommendations as to what my next chunk of change spent on this bike should be spent on? (If the answer is don't spend anything else and go ride for a season or two, ya moron, then great!)

    Thanks!
    Jason W, from Albuquerque, NM










  2. #2
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    After reading this thread, I am slightly worried about the carbon seatstays. Even though they appear to be in good condition, how careful do I need to be about them breaking? I took a spill the day before, but no damage was done that I can see. Not even a scratch. But do I need to be extra careful on this frame? Thanks!

    My terrible, awful experience with FELT

  3. #3
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    Great bike! I did exactly what you did...bought that Felt RXC used for about $400...you did a lot better than me as mine was fairly used and yours looks to be in better shape. I rode mine for a whole summer and then started to have the upgrade itch...and after some extensive research I sold it and bought a new bike. I would be careful whether to upgrade. For a $450 bike, if you throw say a new fork and some drivetrain parts that would cost $2-$400...and at that point you should have just sold the Felt and bought something else with better parts.

    This particular Felt if kept in good shape is a solid entry level bike. The fork really sucks though...I would just upgrade that and not a single other thing unless it breaks. Going to disc brakes is not worth is since 1) it has no rear disc tab and 2) you would need to get a new rim.

    $200 max for a new fork...I'd recommend an old Reba or the Rock Shox Recon at Performance on sale. Don't worry about the seat stays...not aware of any RXC that had issues. The parts are mostly Deore but they should work fine.

    I liked my RXC so much that I keep my eye out for a frame (latter years were disc compatible) and if I can score a cheap one, I just might build up another.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by hken2 View Post
    $200 max for a new fork...I'd recommend an old Reba or the Rock Shox Recon at Performance on sale. Don't worry about the seat stays...not aware of any RXC that had issues. The parts are mostly Deore but they should work fine.
    Thanks for the post! As for the front fork, how much travel do those forks afford and where should I start if trying to find an old Reba? Love the looks of Rebas that I've seen around on this forum.

  5. #5
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    Don't spend a lot of money upgrading the bike. If you decide you want a new fork, the most I would consider would be a Rockshox XC series (formerly Dart). Entry level, but decent. You may want to see if tubeless is an option with a Stan's rimstrip/kit but I don't know anything about the wheels. If the rim width is under 20mm, I personally wouldn't do it. Wider is better here.

    Otherwise, ride the heck out of it and have fun. You'll know when you've out-ridden the capabilities of the bike, and when you do, upgrade.
    Please donate to IMBA or your local IMBA chapter. It's trail karma.

  6. #6
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    The RXC uses an 80mm fork so Ebay, Craigslist or Pinkbike is your best bet. I would say to make this upgrade worthwhile try and get an air fork. Not saying coil is bad but if you can be patient I think you'll like the air fork.

  7. #7
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    You can put a disc brake up front, but your frame was not designed to mount a rear disc.
    I crashed hard enough on my Tallboy to break my leg,
    The carbon is way more durable than most people.

  8. #8
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    I say ride the heck out of it. Don't sweat the carbon fiber thing, theres tons of bikes with it in use and problems are few in relation. As for any changes to the bike. I would only change out the things that improove your personal comfort, like the saddle, bars, stem, and grips. If it already fits you like a glove then cool, you could look at tires that are better suited to your local riding conditions. In regards to tires. If you don't have other expierienced riders that you currently ride with that you could ask for recomendations, search this site by starting with your state. Oh and look into it real good before you attemp to convert to tubeless. Some rims are not good canidates for this conversion. This is no joke, and could end in a fatality.

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