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  1. #1
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    Yet another fender thread

    Made these from a plastic 55 gallon drum, very sturdy.




  2. #2
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    Wow, those look great! Nice work!

  3. #3
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    Those look great! Way to use your brain and recycle!
    Jason
    Disclaimer: www.paramountsports.net

  4. #4
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    Great idea, and well executed.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  5. #5
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    Superb!
    2014 milage so far - 2,485
    www.ukfatbikes.co.uk

  6. #6
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    What a great "green" idea.....market it and make millions!

  7. #7
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    Neat job , and match the bike
    plan it...build it....ride it...love it....
    http://coastkid.blogspot.com/

  8. #8
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    "Yet another"?! There is no such thing as too many home brew threads.

  9. #9
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    Very cool and well executed too.

  10. #10
    Machinist
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    Bad a$$!!!!
    "Ya can't argue logic with ignorance.''

  11. #11
    Lighten up.
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    Dang. Great idea!

  12. #12
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    Nice work, Best Fat Fenders I've seen. If your not going to bring them to market and willing to give away details about what parts you used and build details I would love the info to build a set

    cheer

  13. #13
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    Dude, that is an awesome implementation of a fantastic idea! Just friggin' nice!

    Funny, I've been a lurker on this forum for years and was about to post up bragging about my fenders - .063" camera-case finish ABS plastic. It works well and is easy to make, but is very flexible. I needed luggage racks front and rear to support them. The drum idea gives much more rigidity. I will go this route next time! Anyway, here's some pics of my attempt. For the record, I like yours better:







    Cheers, and thanks for the post!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by dead10 View Post
    Nice work, Best Fat Fenders I've seen. If your not going to bring them to market and willing to give away details about what parts you used and build details I would love the info to build a set

    cheer
    Thanks all for the great feedback. This turned out much more easy to do than I thought it would. I was looking at doing the split fender/add material method but thought they would not hold up to my abuse, plus I didn't like the cost of the base fenders. I have had a few plastic barrels behind the shop for years that I was going to use for trash cans, but without handles I never got too excited about that idea. (I am a cabinetmaker by trade and have a small wood shop) The most expensive item on this project was the $4 freeze plug used to attach the front fender to the fork. That also turned out to be the time saver as I thought I was going to have to fabricate some thing to bolt into the tube with a nut to receive the fender. So, here is a quick run down of the barrel fender;

    The barrels I have are only 24" in diameter. Not to worry. The material is a piece of cake to work with and it is colored all the way through so you don't have to worry about scratches or chips showing. You could use a heat gun to re-shape, but hot water works well too. I first cut a 4 1/2" band from the barrel, centered on a support rib.(I didn't think of using the rib until I looked at the barrel and thought to myself, "Self, that would look better and be much stronger, my you are a handsome man.) But I digress!
    Then I notched out some material to fit the fender between the fork tubes and seat stays so I could keep the fender at 4 1/2" inches. This plastic is easy to cut, sand, or grind with standard wood working tools. I am at 9" in front of the fork crown and 22 " behind. I used what was left fron the "hoop" for the rear. If I had to do it over again, I would only go 20" behind the crown. That would leave me 2 more inches to drop around the rear. I tested the set on 14 miles of ATV trail and hit every mud puddle and slime section I could find. I was still getting a small amount of splatter on my back pack from the rear tire (that is how we spell it here you Scotts, but don't be offended, I come from a long line of Duncans) and the front tire was still slinging mud on the BB and rear derailer. I am going to add a mud flap to the front and raised the rear end of the rear 3/4" to deflect the mud better. Since I didn't want the front to come down too low to catch frozen ruts and such, I would prefer it to be a little shorter and add a flexable flap to do the job. Adding a couple inches to the rear will still keep it from extending past the back of the tire, again making sure it doesn't hit when going over logs etc. Even as they are now, I can plow though deep puddles and my feet and water bottle stay dry.
    After cutting and fitting around the fork and seatstays, it's time to bolt things together. My Pugs has mounts below and behind the front derailer and at the seatstay crown. I just drilled a 3/16" hole and used the screws that were filling those holes. On the rear, I mounted a Bontrager "large" rack for disc brakes. These work well for the offset Pugs. Both sides of the rack have a standoff to clear the calipers/center the rack for a standard frame. Cut off the standoff on the cassette side and it will center the rack for our offset frames. I have a zip-ty connecting the forward rung of the rack and made a braket (bent aluminim flat bar) at the rear. There is not enough room to use the struts sent with the rack as they mount under the rack and space is too tight, but the barrel material is very strong and supports the rack great. I also cut a groove in the top side of the fender to allow the cable for the rear derailer more room.
    On the front fender, I cut off a couple rods from a rack I had bought at a garage sale years ago and made struts from them. They attach to the fender with a couple of padded wire clamps, and attach to the fork mounts with nylon spacers to clear the radius of the fork tubes. At the fork crown, I bought a 1" freeze plug and sanded it down to fit in the tube. For those that don't know what a freeze plug is, it is a thick rubber washer around 1" thick, with a steel washer on both ends. It has a bolt that runs through it and as you tighten the bolt it squishes and gets larger in diameter and gets tight inside the tube. This fills the tube and as you have run the bolt through the fender, bolts the fender to the under side of the fork.
    All in all, it only cost me about $7 and a few hours of tinkering.
    Good luck and fun with the project.

  15. #15
    Rednose/Greenback
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    Excellent. Period

  16. #16
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    Outstanding. It's amazing how well homebrewed projects can turn out.

  17. #17
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    this is a spectacular idea ....where would I get the plastic barrels? Are these 55 gallon drums?

    Thx

    Makr

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slarti View Post
    this is a spectacular idea ....where would I get the plastic barrels? Are these 55 gallon drums?

    Thx

    Makr
    I can't remember how I wound up with these, but they were free. They are 55 gallon or close to it. I think they had soap in them when new. You can google used barrels or hit Craig's list to see if there are some local. If anyone is in the north Idaho/Spokane area I would be happy to part with one for a good cause.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slarti View Post
    this is a spectacular idea ....where would I get the plastic barrels? Are these 55 gallon drums?

    Thx

    Makr
    I work in the dairy industry. If you have any dairy in your area, or any Ag in general, I can guarantee you there are barrels to be had for free. Farmers have to buy needed cleaners, sanitizers, teat dips, etc. And often they get them in 55g drums. Luckily I work for a good company that takes back and re-uses all of our barrels, but many do not. And we can only re-use the barrels in certain colors.
    Farmers and dealers usually have many of these around that they would love to get part with

  20. #20
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    My local carwash has empty soap drums free for the taking. Some are the large 55g some are a smaller 35-40g size. "Shop" around, you can surely pick some up locally for free.

  21. #21
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    Hey guys...
    I finally got around to picking up a barrel from my local carwash. My next question for Idahodirt is, what tool did you use to cut the barrel?

    Thx

    Mark

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slarti View Post
    Hey guys...
    I finally got around to picking up a barrel from my local carwash. My next question for Idahodirt is, what tool did you use to cut the barrel?

    Thx

    Mark
    I used a skill saw to rough cut the hoops. Then I used a table saw for the final cut. I have a small, well equipped cabinet shop so it was easy. I also used a 5" grinder with a sanding disc to round the ends and cut the reliefs for the frame tubes.

  23. #23
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    If you have a heat gun you can flow the plastic enough so that the scratches from cutting and sanding disappear and it will look factory.

    (Just practise on scrap first - you wouldn't want to melt your nice work).
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  24. #24
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    Mate, This gave me a good laugh and BTW, great job.

    Quote;(I didn't think of using the rib until I looked at the barrel and thought to myself, "Self, that would look better and be much stronger, my you are a handsome man.)Quote.

    Al

  25. #25
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    This is gonna seem a daft question, but do you have a photo of the donor barrel??

  26. #26
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    Not yet...but I'll try and take one.

  27. #27
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    Here you go...

    Yet another fender thread-img_20111206_155015-copy.jpg

    Yet another fender thread-img_20111206_155054-copy.jpg


    Now to the OP...the circumference of the barrel is 73 in....do you think that will work? just not sure since the total encumbrance of the tire is about 90 in.

    Thx

    Mark

  28. #28
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    Don't worry about the radius, you can heat the plastic with a heat gun or hot water,etc. and flex it out to match. You may want to research how far to run the fenders around, it pays to have more coverage than less. I have since added the famous "chrome naked lady"mud flap to the front. I hardly have to rinse off after a muddy ride, and you can keep all the muk off the derailer and chain rings and water bottles.

  29. #29
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    This is my bike after a 24 hour solo in a muddy race earlier this month. Above the knee I was clean. More importantly I was dry so the hypothermia risk was avoided.

    I extended the mudguards the day before the race after a recce lap.

    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  30. #30
    Dr. Frost
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    This is my bike after a 24 hour solo in a muddy race earlier this month. Above the knee I was clean. More importantly I was dry so the hypothermia risk was avoided.

    I extended the mudguards the day before the race after a recce lap.

    Are those plastic barrel fenders? And what are the red bar ends??

    Joe

  31. #31
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    I added the mud flap to extend the fender down but still be flexable and not hang up on trail junk. If you imagine a tangent line off your wheel, that is how high the mud will hit.

    Last edited by idahodirt; 01-29-2012 at 09:18 PM.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fastskiguy View Post
    Are those plastic barrel fenders? And what are the red bar ends?...
    Not barrel fenders - just demonstrating the virtues of full coverage.

    The red barends are so I can turn the bike upside down on the trail to work on it and not get crap in my levers etc. (Sometimes have an Alfine shifter to protect)
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  33. #33
    Dr. Frost
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    ah, I get it. So what kind of fenders do you have there? They certainly have a "moto" look!


    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Not barrel fenders - just demonstrating the virtues of full coverage.

    The red barends are so I can turn the bike upside down on the trail to work on it and not get crap in my levers etc. (Sometimes have an Alfine shifter to protect)

  34. #34
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    Ok...so I have taken the plunge and cut the first rib out. It was a rough cut of 5 in total, so I have some shaving to do...Will not be easy as the barrel is 1/4 in thick!

    I want to see if I can get some mounting recommendations. I am just totally sick of the year without a winter here in Chicago. We have had plenty of moisture, :just not much cold. As a result, there is a ton of water on the ground/crushed limestone trails that I ride. I came home this weekend completely covered in fine powdered crushed limestone and I just don't want to deal with that any more. Any faster than 10 mph and that crap was splashing up into my eyes and mouth. I have to get the fenders on the bike. I hope to have them cut out by tomorrow.

    Any ideas on how to mount them would really be appreciated.

    Thx

    mark

    P.S. I'll try and have pics up of current progress tonight or tomorrow.

  35. #35
    Dr. Frost
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    Hey Velobike....what kind of fenders are those? They look really cool!

  36. #36
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    I modified Planet Bike Cascadia 29er fender with the help of a Rubbermaid trashcan. I'd post pictures but I can't because of noob status. Also made up a small one that only protects the drive train and is always on the bike when the full fenders aren't. My next project will be to find a way to scrape caked mud off the rear tire before it is scraped off by the chain.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonic Death Monkey View Post
    I modified Planet Bike Cascadia 29er fender with the help of a Rubbermaid trashcan. I'd post pictures but I can't because of noob status. Also made up a small one that only protects the drive train and is always on the bike when the full fenders aren't. My next project will be to find a way to scrape caked mud off the rear tire before it is scraped off by the chain.
    I'd sure like to see pictures of your work, particularly of the one that protects the drive train. You can make 10 posts here:
    So now we need to have a minimum post count of 10 to post pictures, huh?

  38. #38
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    Thanks for the tip. Here's some pics. Glad to help with questions.









    Drive train only "racing" fender
    Last edited by Sonic Death Monkey; 02-16-2012 at 07:28 PM. Reason: Typo

  39. #39
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    Beautiful AND functional. Well done. What exactly did you use to attach the split fenders to the center material? They look perfect and hopefully lighter than some of the heavy bolts and nuts others are using. What do you suppose the total cost of materials was? Thanks!

  40. #40
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    - I used aluminum pop rivets, which cost about $18 at Ace Hardware. The tool to install them is probably $14 if you don't have one. I had to use a combination of two different lengths: 1/8" and 3/16" (?) I believe, and some spacers. The rivets that go through just the fender and added plastic are shorter than the ones that go through the fender, plastic and stay brackets.
    - The fenders are the Planet Bike Cascadia 29er (polycarbonate) (~$50).
    - The 3" of added material is from a Rubbermaid trashcan - ~$15.

    So, if you have all the tools to do this, and a good full day to fully build and fit, it's very affordable. I think the only other thing I had to buy was a piece of metal and some screws to modify into the front fender bracket.

    Using the Rubbermaid-derived material takes significantly longer than using a roll of Aluminum (I've done both). The AL is much easier to cut because you can buy a roll of it from Home Depot with a nice square edge, but it's not nearly as durable, and in my opinion doesn't look as good as the black on black.
    Last edited by Sonic Death Monkey; 02-13-2012 at 09:16 PM. Reason: typo

  41. #41
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    I just finished my front fender. Need to start the rear now! I used planet bike fenders also. It looks like theres wrinkles in the fender in the pic, but, its just a bad picture. I also used black silicone when I put the fender together, to seal everything up nice.

  42. #42
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    Great idea (silicone)! Let me know what you decide to do for a front fork mounting bracket. It's the only part of my design that I'm not 100% happy with: While the rear fender is very stable, the back of the front fender has a little more wobble than I'd like over rough terrain. I have some ideas on how to improve it but nothing that will be light or cosmetically pleasing.

    Also, if anyone is interested, I've successfully modified my Thule T2 Platform rack to better accommodate the 3.8" tires (fully inflated) using some 4" PVC, a few bolts, and a 2x4. But that's for another thread.

  43. #43
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    Thanks for the very helpful info, Sonic. Your racing fender is great too; I made something similar for riding my FS mtb through winter sand/salt/ice crud. Keeping crap out of the drivetrain keeps me spinning through the winter, certainly on a 26 x 2".

    Now I'm in the 2 x 3.8" club and considering all sorts of fender options. My plastic sled fenders would provide some amusement but I can't upload photos, no matter what file type, size, name I try. I made them with stuff, okay junk, but free junk, we had lying around while waiting for a local entrepreneur to restock his $125 fat fenders. His look great from the photos but wow, pretty expensive considering Planet Bike 29er fenders sells for as little as $45.

    I'm heavily weighing out your engineering plan and the costs involved. They do add up, don't they? BTW, Planet Bike told me they don't have immediate plans to build fat fenders. My bet is that Surly (QBP) will contract them to build fat fenders in the near future, or vice versa.

  44. #44
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    I like the barrel fenders. Cheap, robust and light.

    If you're going to spend money on fenders don't forget motorcycle trials bike fenders look like they are made to fit a fatbike, are very strong yet light, and they are a lot less work to setup than those split ones (which do look very nice though).
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  45. #45
    wheelmanron
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    This is my bike after a 24 hour solo in a muddy race earlier this month. Above the knee I was clean. More importantly I was dry so the hypothermia risk was avoided.

    I extended the mudguards the day before the race after a recce lap.

    How are those drum brakes?

  46. #46
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    The barrel fender is a great idea. I'm going to look into obtaining one of these large plastic barrels to try out. I've become s bit of a fat bike fender addict.

  47. #47
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    Well done!
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  48. #48
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    The good folks at MTBR have helped me upload this shot of my designer fenders with custom coat hanger stays. I knew there'd be a reason to keeping a crappy orange sled around for 20 years. It's labeled Paris so I knew it must be rare and valuable.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Yet another fender thread-dsc_0059.jpg  

    Yet another fender thread-dsc_0060.jpg  


  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonic Death Monkey View Post
    Great idea (silicone)! Let me know what you decide to do for a front fork mounting bracket. It's the only part of my design that I'm not 100% happy with: While the rear fender is very stable, the back of the front fender has a little more wobble than I'd like over rough terrain. I have some ideas on how to improve it but nothing that will be light or cosmetically pleasing.
    I had to stiffen up the front of mine with some aluminum bar stock. I found the fender bounced up and down too much on rougher terrain and would hit the wheel. No exactly cosmetically pleasing, but it worked out well. I just think of it as a racing stripe.


  50. #50
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    My fenders don't rattle, bounce, or otherwise move around. Maybe there's something to be said for motorbike parts
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

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