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  1. #1
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    Yet another fender thread

    Made these from a plastic 55 gallon drum, very sturdy.




  2. #2
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    Wow, those look great! Nice work!

  3. #3
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    Those look great! Way to use your brain and recycle!
    Jason
    Disclaimer: www.paramountsports.net

  4. #4
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    Great idea, and well executed.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  5. #5
    Geordie biker
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    Superb!
    2014 milage so far - 2,485
    www.ukfatbikes.co.uk

  6. #6
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    What a great "green" idea.....market it and make millions!

  7. #7
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    Neat job , and match the bike
    plan it...build it....ride it...love it....
    http://coastkid.blogspot.com/

  8. #8
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    "Yet another"?! There is no such thing as too many home brew threads.

  9. #9
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    Very cool and well executed too.

  10. #10
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    Bad a$$!!!!
    "Ya can't argue logic with ignorance.''

  11. #11
    Lighten up.
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    Dang. Great idea!

  12. #12
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    Nice work, Best Fat Fenders I've seen. If your not going to bring them to market and willing to give away details about what parts you used and build details I would love the info to build a set

    cheer

  13. #13
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    Dude, that is an awesome implementation of a fantastic idea! Just friggin' nice!

    Funny, I've been a lurker on this forum for years and was about to post up bragging about my fenders - .063" camera-case finish ABS plastic. It works well and is easy to make, but is very flexible. I needed luggage racks front and rear to support them. The drum idea gives much more rigidity. I will go this route next time! Anyway, here's some pics of my attempt. For the record, I like yours better:







    Cheers, and thanks for the post!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by dead10 View Post
    Nice work, Best Fat Fenders I've seen. If your not going to bring them to market and willing to give away details about what parts you used and build details I would love the info to build a set

    cheer
    Thanks all for the great feedback. This turned out much more easy to do than I thought it would. I was looking at doing the split fender/add material method but thought they would not hold up to my abuse, plus I didn't like the cost of the base fenders. I have had a few plastic barrels behind the shop for years that I was going to use for trash cans, but without handles I never got too excited about that idea. (I am a cabinetmaker by trade and have a small wood shop) The most expensive item on this project was the $4 freeze plug used to attach the front fender to the fork. That also turned out to be the time saver as I thought I was going to have to fabricate some thing to bolt into the tube with a nut to receive the fender. So, here is a quick run down of the barrel fender;

    The barrels I have are only 24" in diameter. Not to worry. The material is a piece of cake to work with and it is colored all the way through so you don't have to worry about scratches or chips showing. You could use a heat gun to re-shape, but hot water works well too. I first cut a 4 1/2" band from the barrel, centered on a support rib.(I didn't think of using the rib until I looked at the barrel and thought to myself, "Self, that would look better and be much stronger, my you are a handsome man.) But I digress!
    Then I notched out some material to fit the fender between the fork tubes and seat stays so I could keep the fender at 4 1/2" inches. This plastic is easy to cut, sand, or grind with standard wood working tools. I am at 9" in front of the fork crown and 22 " behind. I used what was left fron the "hoop" for the rear. If I had to do it over again, I would only go 20" behind the crown. That would leave me 2 more inches to drop around the rear. I tested the set on 14 miles of ATV trail and hit every mud puddle and slime section I could find. I was still getting a small amount of splatter on my back pack from the rear tire (that is how we spell it here you Scotts, but don't be offended, I come from a long line of Duncans) and the front tire was still slinging mud on the BB and rear derailer. I am going to add a mud flap to the front and raised the rear end of the rear 3/4" to deflect the mud better. Since I didn't want the front to come down too low to catch frozen ruts and such, I would prefer it to be a little shorter and add a flexable flap to do the job. Adding a couple inches to the rear will still keep it from extending past the back of the tire, again making sure it doesn't hit when going over logs etc. Even as they are now, I can plow though deep puddles and my feet and water bottle stay dry.
    After cutting and fitting around the fork and seatstays, it's time to bolt things together. My Pugs has mounts below and behind the front derailer and at the seatstay crown. I just drilled a 3/16" hole and used the screws that were filling those holes. On the rear, I mounted a Bontrager "large" rack for disc brakes. These work well for the offset Pugs. Both sides of the rack have a standoff to clear the calipers/center the rack for a standard frame. Cut off the standoff on the cassette side and it will center the rack for our offset frames. I have a zip-ty connecting the forward rung of the rack and made a braket (bent aluminim flat bar) at the rear. There is not enough room to use the struts sent with the rack as they mount under the rack and space is too tight, but the barrel material is very strong and supports the rack great. I also cut a groove in the top side of the fender to allow the cable for the rear derailer more room.
    On the front fender, I cut off a couple rods from a rack I had bought at a garage sale years ago and made struts from them. They attach to the fender with a couple of padded wire clamps, and attach to the fork mounts with nylon spacers to clear the radius of the fork tubes. At the fork crown, I bought a 1" freeze plug and sanded it down to fit in the tube. For those that don't know what a freeze plug is, it is a thick rubber washer around 1" thick, with a steel washer on both ends. It has a bolt that runs through it and as you tighten the bolt it squishes and gets larger in diameter and gets tight inside the tube. This fills the tube and as you have run the bolt through the fender, bolts the fender to the under side of the fork.
    All in all, it only cost me about $7 and a few hours of tinkering.
    Good luck and fun with the project.

  15. #15
    Rednose/Greenback
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    Excellent. Period

  16. #16
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    Outstanding. It's amazing how well homebrewed projects can turn out.

  17. #17
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    this is a spectacular idea ....where would I get the plastic barrels? Are these 55 gallon drums?

    Thx

    Makr

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slarti View Post
    this is a spectacular idea ....where would I get the plastic barrels? Are these 55 gallon drums?

    Thx

    Makr
    I can't remember how I wound up with these, but they were free. They are 55 gallon or close to it. I think they had soap in them when new. You can google used barrels or hit Craig's list to see if there are some local. If anyone is in the north Idaho/Spokane area I would be happy to part with one for a good cause.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slarti View Post
    this is a spectacular idea ....where would I get the plastic barrels? Are these 55 gallon drums?

    Thx

    Makr
    I work in the dairy industry. If you have any dairy in your area, or any Ag in general, I can guarantee you there are barrels to be had for free. Farmers have to buy needed cleaners, sanitizers, teat dips, etc. And often they get them in 55g drums. Luckily I work for a good company that takes back and re-uses all of our barrels, but many do not. And we can only re-use the barrels in certain colors.
    Farmers and dealers usually have many of these around that they would love to get part with

  20. #20
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    My local carwash has empty soap drums free for the taking. Some are the large 55g some are a smaller 35-40g size. "Shop" around, you can surely pick some up locally for free.

  21. #21
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    Hey guys...
    I finally got around to picking up a barrel from my local carwash. My next question for Idahodirt is, what tool did you use to cut the barrel?

    Thx

    Mark

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slarti View Post
    Hey guys...
    I finally got around to picking up a barrel from my local carwash. My next question for Idahodirt is, what tool did you use to cut the barrel?

    Thx

    Mark
    I used a skill saw to rough cut the hoops. Then I used a table saw for the final cut. I have a small, well equipped cabinet shop so it was easy. I also used a 5" grinder with a sanding disc to round the ends and cut the reliefs for the frame tubes.

  23. #23
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    If you have a heat gun you can flow the plastic enough so that the scratches from cutting and sanding disappear and it will look factory.

    (Just practise on scrap first - you wouldn't want to melt your nice work).
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  24. #24
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    Mate, This gave me a good laugh and BTW, great job.

    Quote;(I didn't think of using the rib until I looked at the barrel and thought to myself, "Self, that would look better and be much stronger, my you are a handsome man.)Quote.

    Al

  25. #25
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    This is gonna seem a daft question, but do you have a photo of the donor barrel??

  26. #26
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    Not yet...but I'll try and take one.

  27. #27
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    Here you go...

    Yet another fender thread-img_20111206_155015-copy.jpg

    Yet another fender thread-img_20111206_155054-copy.jpg


    Now to the OP...the circumference of the barrel is 73 in....do you think that will work? just not sure since the total encumbrance of the tire is about 90 in.

    Thx

    Mark

  28. #28
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    Don't worry about the radius, you can heat the plastic with a heat gun or hot water,etc. and flex it out to match. You may want to research how far to run the fenders around, it pays to have more coverage than less. I have since added the famous "chrome naked lady"mud flap to the front. I hardly have to rinse off after a muddy ride, and you can keep all the muk off the derailer and chain rings and water bottles.

  29. #29
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    This is my bike after a 24 hour solo in a muddy race earlier this month. Above the knee I was clean. More importantly I was dry so the hypothermia risk was avoided.

    I extended the mudguards the day before the race after a recce lap.

    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    This is my bike after a 24 hour solo in a muddy race earlier this month. Above the knee I was clean. More importantly I was dry so the hypothermia risk was avoided.

    I extended the mudguards the day before the race after a recce lap.

    Are those plastic barrel fenders? And what are the red bar ends??

    Joe

  31. #31
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    I added the mud flap to extend the fender down but still be flexable and not hang up on trail junk. If you imagine a tangent line off your wheel, that is how high the mud will hit.

    Last edited by idahodirt; 01-29-2012 at 10:18 PM.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fastskiguy View Post
    Are those plastic barrel fenders? And what are the red bar ends?...
    Not barrel fenders - just demonstrating the virtues of full coverage.

    The red barends are so I can turn the bike upside down on the trail to work on it and not get crap in my levers etc. (Sometimes have an Alfine shifter to protect)
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  33. #33
    Dr. Frost
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    ah, I get it. So what kind of fenders do you have there? They certainly have a "moto" look!


    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Not barrel fenders - just demonstrating the virtues of full coverage.

    The red barends are so I can turn the bike upside down on the trail to work on it and not get crap in my levers etc. (Sometimes have an Alfine shifter to protect)

  34. #34
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    Ok...so I have taken the plunge and cut the first rib out. It was a rough cut of 5 in total, so I have some shaving to do...Will not be easy as the barrel is 1/4 in thick!

    I want to see if I can get some mounting recommendations. I am just totally sick of the year without a winter here in Chicago. We have had plenty of moisture, :just not much cold. As a result, there is a ton of water on the ground/crushed limestone trails that I ride. I came home this weekend completely covered in fine powdered crushed limestone and I just don't want to deal with that any more. Any faster than 10 mph and that crap was splashing up into my eyes and mouth. I have to get the fenders on the bike. I hope to have them cut out by tomorrow.

    Any ideas on how to mount them would really be appreciated.

    Thx

    mark

    P.S. I'll try and have pics up of current progress tonight or tomorrow.

  35. #35
    Dr. Frost
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    Hey Velobike....what kind of fenders are those? They look really cool!

  36. #36
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    I modified Planet Bike Cascadia 29er fender with the help of a Rubbermaid trashcan. I'd post pictures but I can't because of noob status. Also made up a small one that only protects the drive train and is always on the bike when the full fenders aren't. My next project will be to find a way to scrape caked mud off the rear tire before it is scraped off by the chain.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonic Death Monkey View Post
    I modified Planet Bike Cascadia 29er fender with the help of a Rubbermaid trashcan. I'd post pictures but I can't because of noob status. Also made up a small one that only protects the drive train and is always on the bike when the full fenders aren't. My next project will be to find a way to scrape caked mud off the rear tire before it is scraped off by the chain.
    I'd sure like to see pictures of your work, particularly of the one that protects the drive train. You can make 10 posts here:
    So now we need to have a minimum post count of 10 to post pictures, huh?

  38. #38
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    Thanks for the tip. Here's some pics. Glad to help with questions.









    Drive train only "racing" fender
    Last edited by Sonic Death Monkey; 02-16-2012 at 08:28 PM. Reason: Typo

  39. #39
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    Beautiful AND functional. Well done. What exactly did you use to attach the split fenders to the center material? They look perfect and hopefully lighter than some of the heavy bolts and nuts others are using. What do you suppose the total cost of materials was? Thanks!

  40. #40
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    - I used aluminum pop rivets, which cost about $18 at Ace Hardware. The tool to install them is probably $14 if you don't have one. I had to use a combination of two different lengths: 1/8" and 3/16" (?) I believe, and some spacers. The rivets that go through just the fender and added plastic are shorter than the ones that go through the fender, plastic and stay brackets.
    - The fenders are the Planet Bike Cascadia 29er (polycarbonate) (~$50).
    - The 3" of added material is from a Rubbermaid trashcan - ~$15.

    So, if you have all the tools to do this, and a good full day to fully build and fit, it's very affordable. I think the only other thing I had to buy was a piece of metal and some screws to modify into the front fender bracket.

    Using the Rubbermaid-derived material takes significantly longer than using a roll of Aluminum (I've done both). The AL is much easier to cut because you can buy a roll of it from Home Depot with a nice square edge, but it's not nearly as durable, and in my opinion doesn't look as good as the black on black.
    Last edited by Sonic Death Monkey; 02-13-2012 at 10:16 PM. Reason: typo

  41. #41
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    I just finished my front fender. Need to start the rear now! I used planet bike fenders also. It looks like theres wrinkles in the fender in the pic, but, its just a bad picture. I also used black silicone when I put the fender together, to seal everything up nice.

  42. #42
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    Great idea (silicone)! Let me know what you decide to do for a front fork mounting bracket. It's the only part of my design that I'm not 100% happy with: While the rear fender is very stable, the back of the front fender has a little more wobble than I'd like over rough terrain. I have some ideas on how to improve it but nothing that will be light or cosmetically pleasing.

    Also, if anyone is interested, I've successfully modified my Thule T2 Platform rack to better accommodate the 3.8" tires (fully inflated) using some 4" PVC, a few bolts, and a 2x4. But that's for another thread.

  43. #43
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    Thanks for the very helpful info, Sonic. Your racing fender is great too; I made something similar for riding my FS mtb through winter sand/salt/ice crud. Keeping crap out of the drivetrain keeps me spinning through the winter, certainly on a 26 x 2".

    Now I'm in the 2 x 3.8" club and considering all sorts of fender options. My plastic sled fenders would provide some amusement but I can't upload photos, no matter what file type, size, name I try. I made them with stuff, okay junk, but free junk, we had lying around while waiting for a local entrepreneur to restock his $125 fat fenders. His look great from the photos but wow, pretty expensive considering Planet Bike 29er fenders sells for as little as $45.

    I'm heavily weighing out your engineering plan and the costs involved. They do add up, don't they? BTW, Planet Bike told me they don't have immediate plans to build fat fenders. My bet is that Surly (QBP) will contract them to build fat fenders in the near future, or vice versa.

  44. #44
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    I like the barrel fenders. Cheap, robust and light.

    If you're going to spend money on fenders don't forget motorcycle trials bike fenders look like they are made to fit a fatbike, are very strong yet light, and they are a lot less work to setup than those split ones (which do look very nice though).
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    This is my bike after a 24 hour solo in a muddy race earlier this month. Above the knee I was clean. More importantly I was dry so the hypothermia risk was avoided.

    I extended the mudguards the day before the race after a recce lap.

    How are those drum brakes?

  46. #46
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    The barrel fender is a great idea. I'm going to look into obtaining one of these large plastic barrels to try out. I've become s bit of a fat bike fender addict.

  47. #47
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    Well done!
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  48. #48
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    The good folks at MTBR have helped me upload this shot of my designer fenders with custom coat hanger stays. I knew there'd be a reason to keeping a crappy orange sled around for 20 years. It's labeled Paris so I knew it must be rare and valuable.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Yet another fender thread-dsc_0059.jpg  

    Yet another fender thread-dsc_0060.jpg  


  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonic Death Monkey View Post
    Great idea (silicone)! Let me know what you decide to do for a front fork mounting bracket. It's the only part of my design that I'm not 100% happy with: While the rear fender is very stable, the back of the front fender has a little more wobble than I'd like over rough terrain. I have some ideas on how to improve it but nothing that will be light or cosmetically pleasing.
    I had to stiffen up the front of mine with some aluminum bar stock. I found the fender bounced up and down too much on rougher terrain and would hit the wheel. No exactly cosmetically pleasing, but it worked out well. I just think of it as a racing stripe.


  50. #50
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    My fenders don't rattle, bounce, or otherwise move around. Maybe there's something to be said for motorbike parts
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by NewFat1 View Post
    The good folks at MTBR have helped me upload this shot of my designer fenders with custom coat hanger stays. I knew there'd be a reason to keeping a crappy orange sled around for 20 years. It's labeled Paris so I knew it must be rare and valuable.
    This is the evolution of creativity. I salute you, mr. snow sled killer.

    - the trashcan killer

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    My fenders don't rattle, bounce, or otherwise move around. Maybe there's something to be said for motorbike parts
    Give yourself a well deserved pat on the back, sir.

  53. #53
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    Velobike, exactly where did you get your motorcycle fenders? What is the model name? I find nothing like yours locally, just more stuff I'd have to add to/modify.

  54. #54
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    Here is my first effort:

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/rmplum/6881257063/" title="Untitled by rmplum, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7067/6881257063_2f0ffa7931_b.jpg" width="768" height="1024" alt=""></a>

    had an old Rubbermaid barrel around that was already cut up, so I finished it off. It's ugly, but should be somewhat effective until I have the time to do something better/cleaner - including some time with the heat gun to shape it a bit. The barrel was quite old though, so it's fairly brittle - making this a short term solution.

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/rmplum/6881260221/" title="Untitled by rmplum, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7204/6881260221_b7751929e7_b.jpg" width="768" height="1024" alt=""></a>

    On the up side - it is VERY solid and quiet. The benefit of mounting it off the rack, and not using flimsy stays. Ordered an SKS Grand D.A.D. for the front.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonic Death Monkey View Post
    This is the evolution of creativity. I salute you, mr. snow sled killer.

    - the trashcan killer
    Sonic Death one, I'm certain yours is an equally noble cause, serving to weed out the sick and/or injured trash cans of the world. And through you, they actually see the world rather than idly sit by in the garage as life passes by.

    See how happy people are on a fat bike:
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  56. #56
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    Fatchanceti, you must've gone hunting with Sonic Death. Well done. You can now rename it Muk-less.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by NewFat1 View Post
    Fatchanceti, you must've gone hunting with Sonic Death. Well done. You can now rename it Muk-less.
    We'll see - the lower part of mine will work well, but I think the top/back part may be too far away to catch all of the splatter. Version 2.0 will be wider in the back, and I'll do some shaping with the extra width to match the tire's profile - and try to drop it down closer to the tire so the spacing from tire to fender is more consistent.

    But so far I've spent $0 on a rear fender, so that's a win.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonic Death Monkey View Post
    Also, if anyone is interested, I've successfully modified my Thule T2 Platform rack to better accommodate the 3.8" tires (fully inflated) using some 4" PVC, a few bolts, and a 2x4. But that's for another thread.
    Interested, do tell!

    Regarding fenders, I stumbled across an interesting fender material in my garage for center section: landscape edging. I have just enough for the procedure. Own a new rivet tool as of today (how did I miss this essential man tool for so long?), just need PB 29ers to operate on.

  59. #59
    A Surly Maverick
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    SDM start that rack mod thread please
    A Fatback'd Lefty for who life IS a Beach

  60. #60
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    hey Sonic,
    Nice job. You've answered a few questions that I had. I've abandoned the barrel for now in favor of the Cascadia. I'm going to cut/split the fenders tomorrow. I already bought the pop rivet tool and figured I'd need 1/8 rivets for the general fender attachments and 3/16 or 1/4 for anchors. How big was the rubber maid can you bought? I was looking at buying some plastic ABS sheet, but if I can find the rubber maid can, I'll do that.

    Did you have extra from the cascadia to make your racing fender?

  61. #61
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    I think I posted the link to the trashcan previously, but if not here it is, available at your friendly neighborhood home depot.

    Some more tips that might help:
    - Pic up some sheets of 120 or 150 grit sandpaper to to smooth out the imperfections in the Cascadia's sawed edges. Just put the paper flat on some plywood or your workbench and work the cut edge of the fender halves over that paper. With a few minutes of sanding, you'll have it almost pro looking.
    - Also get some blue painters tape if you don't have it already
    - If you drill out the rivets for the stay brackets and re-rivet them later, sandwiched between the fender and the spacer material, the fender will be much stronger. To pull this off, you cut the brackets in half, obviously.
    - The Rubbermaid material is extremely durable to everything but heat, so be careful if you need to Dremel anything that you don't let it heat up through the plastic.
    - The Rubbermaid material should be cut to exactly 3" wide. Any wider and the fender will not seat well into the frame and will be too close to the tire (assuming Mukluk - I have no idea if 3" will work on a pugs but it probably will).
    - In order to get a strip of material 3" wide out of that trashcan for both fenders, you will have to cut around those wavy contours that Rubbermaid designed into the can for aesthetics very closely. Lay out the strip that you'll cut with paper first and you'll see what I mean.
    - That said, one trashcan should yield plenty of material for both fenders. You will need both the top and bottom parts of the can. Give the lid to your kids to use as shields to defend against evil.
    - The smoother side (from the inside of the can) is also the inside of the fender.
    - Use the painters tape to mock up the fender by taping up the inside (smooth side). You can't tape the rough side with this painters tape and you wont need to. This makes it easy to test fit it on the bike and get your bearings before you start drilling holes in things. Although, if I ever make another set, I may drill the holes for the new rivets prior to ripping because I know it will fit.
    - Center punch everything before drilling or your bit will walk all over the place. The polycarbonate is not super stiff.

    Good luck with your project! I had a blast doing this, and you will too.
    Last edited by Sonic Death Monkey; 02-18-2012 at 10:38 PM. Reason: Typos

  62. #62
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    Hey guys, I found an existing thread on fat bike racking. I recommend starting on page 1 (there's only 2 pages). I'm on page two with my mod and reasons why (some guys have been able to jam their bikes into the factory setup). The link

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by NewFat1 View Post
    Velobike, exactly where did you get your motorcycle fenders? What is the model name? I find nothing like yours locally, just more stuff I'd have to add to/modify.
    In the UK
    TY Trials

    I'm sure they would be available in the USA.

    How to do it is in this thread.

    Fat mudguards - Do it yourself :)
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  64. #64
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    Here's my solution:
    Yet another fender thread-fender-001.jpg
    Yet another fender thread-fender-002.jpg
    Works in snow
    I haven't tried it in the mud yet
    Mr.Green

  65. #65
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    Those like pretty darn good Lars. What's the source material/fender?

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lars Thomsen View Post
    Here's my solution:
    Works in snow
    I haven't tried it in the mud yet
    Are those trials fronts?
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  67. #67
    Mr.Green
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    The fenders are 3x'Universal Trials Fender Mudguard - Front' from 'TYTrials.co.uk'
    (Modified by boiling wather and some cutting/drilling)
    The aluminium stays are 2xGB stainless fenders 60 (219TRI1/60) cut into 4,
    'bent into submission'
    Name:  21P15.jpg
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    I've used a' front fender silent bloc screw' (219SIL100),
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    (I've not used the washers/silent bloc)
    a 'fixing screw set for fender stay on drop out' (219KIT100),
    with some additional washers, to make the 'aluminium stay's clear the fork.
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    and a 'fixing screw set for fender stay on fenders' (219KIT102)
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    (I've also not used these washers)
    from 'gillesberthoud.fr'
    The Mudflap is a slightly modified 'Brompton' front Mud Flap

    It's my second attempt and I've made a pair for my brother's Pug to.
    Mr.Green

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatchanceti View Post
    Here is my first effort:

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/rmplum/6881257063/" title="Untitled by rmplum, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7067/6881257063_2f0ffa7931_b.jpg" width="768" height="1024" alt=""></a>

    had an old Rubbermaid barrel around that was already cut up, so I finished it off. It's ugly, but should be somewhat effective until I have the time to do something better/cleaner - including some time with the heat gun to shape it a bit. The barrel was quite old though, so it's fairly brittle - making this a short term solution.

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/rmplum/6881260221/" title="Untitled by rmplum, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7204/6881260221_b7751929e7_b.jpg" width="768" height="1024" alt=""></a>

    On the up side - it is VERY solid and quiet. The benefit of mounting it off the rack, and not using flimsy stays. Ordered an SKS Grand D.A.D. for the front.
    hey y'all - just to save you some time - don't bother with what I did above. Didn't work worth a $hit. You need the curve profile around the tire, and mine are too far away from the tire at the top. I have one of the SKS Grand D.A.D. fenders on the front. Eh. Anyway, after 30 minutes in the mud, I was covered with much of it, as was the bike.

  69. #69
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    Finished my fenders.


    Salsa Mukluk 2 by HAGASAN, on Flickr

  70. #70
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    Hey guys...
    first off let me say my hat is off to all you guys that home brew these fenders...it is not easy.

    I finished my Cascadia conversion...and after the first ride in the dirt, it was basically an epic fail. I'll post pics later, but first off I agree with Sonic...Make your drill holes in the fender prior to cutting the fender...for those like me that aren't that good at exact measurements, it will make for a much cleaner easier installation. Next I also agree, make a template of what you're going to cut out of the barrel and lay that over the barrel so you know what to cut and what will fit. Again, avoids mistakes.

    NOTE: This is only for the rear fender. The front is complete but I have some challenges in mounting.

    My problem was this...while the Pugsly was static...everything looked/rolled good. As soon as I got out on the trail and was bouncing around, the fender swayed side to side way too much and the Nate just punished it. The stays are bent and the bottom of the fender (back of the bike) got caught somehow and ripped the rivet right out. There is just not enough clearance side to side. I will either have to bend the the stays or cut another piece of material to a longer width to widen the fenders somehow. Really sucks. I need fenders here in Chicago...been no real winter, and it's plenty wet, so as soon as it get even close to freezing with the sun out everything turns to muck and the crushed limestone on the trails is brutal...you come home covered in cement.

    any suggestions would be appreciated. I'm sure part of my challenge is the offset on the Pugsly with the Large Marge wheels...

    I may end up trying the Trial bike fenders, but I can't find the ones Velo used here the Chicago area.

    thx guys.

    Mark

  71. #71
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    Mark,

    I first tried to fit the fenders I made to a Moolander and noticed that because of the frame being offset, sliding drop-outs and the verticle mounting holes on the braces, i had to figure out a way to install the fenders in a way that they can be removed from the rear kind of like a quick release so I would be able to change the rear tube if needed.

    Anyway, I changed my mind and installed them on the Mukluk as it is easier. Not sure if you want to spend the cash, but i highly recommend MKfenders. Mark does great work and they are exactly what you need. I live in the Chicago area also and i hate cleaning concrete of my bike too. I will be trying to sell the ones on my bike I made because I already purchased a set from Mark and they should be here soon.

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by HAGASAN View Post
    ...i had to figure out a way to install the fenders in a way that they can be removed from the rear kind of like a quick release so I would be able to change the rear tube if needed....
    This is how I do it on my Pug. I used the mounts for a rear rack for the pivoting bit.

    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slarti View Post
    Hey guys...
    first off let me say my hat is off to all you guys that home brew these fenders...it is not easy.

    I finished my Cascadia conversion...and after the first ride in the dirt, it was basically an epic fail. I'll post pics later, but first off I agree with Sonic...Make your drill holes in the fender prior to cutting the fender...for those like me that aren't that good at exact measurements, it will make for a much cleaner easier installation. Next I also agree, make a template of what you're going to cut out of the barrel and lay that over the barrel so you know what to cut and what will fit. Again, avoids mistakes.

    NOTE: This is only for the rear fender. The front is complete but I have some challenges in mounting.

    My problem was this...while the Pugsly was static...everything looked/rolled good. As soon as I got out on the trail and was bouncing around, the fender swayed side to side way too much and the Nate just punished it. The stays are bent and the bottom of the fender (back of the bike) got caught somehow and ripped the rivet right out. There is just not enough clearance side to side. I will either have to bend the the stays or cut another piece of material to a longer width to widen the fenders somehow. Really sucks. I need fenders here in Chicago...been no real winter, and it's plenty wet, so as soon as it get even close to freezing with the sun out everything turns to muck and the crushed limestone on the trails is brutal...you come home covered in cement.

    any suggestions would be appreciated. I'm sure part of my challenge is the offset on the Pugsly with the Large Marge wheels...

    I may end up trying the Trial bike fenders, but I can't find the ones Velo used here the Chicago area.

    thx guys.

    Mark
    When I first read about the Planet Bike fender modification back in another post last fall. The original post had used 3" strips of aluminum. I used plastic strips. I also cut about 10 " off the front section of the rear fender to make it a bit lighter. Didn't need it wrapping way down the tire like the original length. As for mounting, when I put the front fender on first, I could not get it to sit "just right" I ended up putting a spacer ( the one's they supply for the disk brake spacing) on each side. This holds the mounting brackets out a bit more from the tire, puts a lot more "pressure" on the mounting points at the fender and holds the fender firmer. I made two more spacers for the rear, one on each side as well. I have not tried my fenders other than in snow conditions, but yes, they move around in the rough stuff but not too badly yet. I'll have to see once the snow melts and my trails are a bit rougher. I can see where the added lugs of the nates might cause problems.

    There is another post on here about a guy starting to make fat bike fenders. They look very good. New Pugsley Fenders!






  74. #74
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    Holy crap there are some great ideas here.

  75. #75
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    Well, I just got my wooden MKfenders in so I am selling the fenders I currently made. Never been outside just mounted to make adjustments.


    Front fender by HAGASAN, on Flickr


    Stainless steel hardware. by HAGASAN, on Flickr


    no front spacer needed by HAGASAN, on Flickr


    Bent-to-fit by HAGASAN, on Flickr


    Chain stay brace by HAGASAN, on Flickr


    seat stay brace by HAGASAN, on Flickr


    Salsa Mukluk 2 by HAGASAN, on Flickr

    Make offer if interested: hagasan2000@gmail.com

    Thanks,
    Joe T

  76. #76
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    I was building fenders today and was pretty far into the rear fender before the Pugsley rear loading dropouts entered my mind. Its getting late so I'll have to pick it up again tomorrow.


  77. #77
    bikeboatbrewski
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    I totally love the barrel fenders, might have to rig some up myself in the spring.

  78. #78
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    Made these about 2 weeks ago didn't know where to put them.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Yet another fender thread-samsung-galaxy-note-050.jpg  

    Yet another fender thread-samsung-galaxy-note-046.jpg  

    Yet another fender thread-samsung-galaxy-note-052.jpg  

    Yet another fender thread-bike.jpg  


  79. #79
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    My masking job leaves something to be desired, but I'm loving the color. Krylon Fusion plastic paint, Burgundy.


  80. #80
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    I gave the front fender a second spray this morning and sprayed the rear one. This evening I got them mounted and will leave the bike inside overnight for the paint to continue curing.

    I used masking tape to mark the center line of the fender as a guide when I cut it using a dremel metal cutting wheel.

    I got a bag of spring clamps for $8 to hold the center strip in place while drilling / riveting. A pair of paint cans helped hold the proper arch while clamping. I was using a vinyl center strip, so while it was clamped I went over it with a heat gun to help the plastic accept its new shape. I'm not sure if that step was necessary.


    After drilling I needed to de-burr the drill holes for the pieces to lay flat.

    I used 3/16" aluminum short rivets with backing plates to hold everything together. I started with a long rivet, but it was too long and I had to drill the first one out. I used a medium length rivet and a backing plate for the first fender stay, but for the rest I used short rivets with no backing plate as the stay material was very sturdy.

    The bracket that connects to the fork crown was far too short. I should have tested the fit before riveting it into place. Rather than remove it I just used another piece of metal to make it fit.


    I needed to do a bit of trimming of the rear fender near the front derailleur to get the fit right. I'm glad I decided to do the fitting before I painted the center strip. If I disconnect the stays I can get the rear wheel in / out with the fender on.






  81. #81
    Dinner for wolves
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    So do ^^^these^^^ great looking fenders work well?
    Responds to gravity

  82. #82
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    Mine seemed to work well today, except they didn't extend down far enough. Once I add a mud flap they should be fine.

  83. #83
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    Okay Gecho, we've seen it clean and it looks great. Now give us a picture of how well they work.

  84. #84
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    They've been working very well since I added a mud flap, though I've encountered mostly water but not much mud. The dirtiest part of the bike seems to be the front of the fork arms. I might ditch the leather flap and install a rubber one.

    A few more tips based on my experiences with the fenders:

    If you plan on using a rear rack, do a test fit before permanently attaching the rear stays. I had to drill out the rivets and move the top two further back. The rack I used fit best if I mounted it to the inside of the drive side seat stay and used a 1/4" space on the outside of the non-drive side.

    Like I said before test fit the fork crown bracket. The stock one almost certainly won't be long enough.

    A front mud flap will be needed otherwise the tire will spray from the middle of the downtube all the way to the bottom bracket and bottom of the rear fender. So think about how you want to attach one before adding the bottom rivets to the front fender. This older fender thread shows a good way to do it if using the Planet Bike fenders: Custom Fenders


  85. #85
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    Thanks for the update, Gecho

    Thoughts of a DIY carbon fiber fender set haunt me these days. Need to marinate on this for a few more days...
    Responds to gravity

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak View Post
    Thanks for the update, Gecho

    Thoughts of a DIY carbon fiber fender set haunt me these days. Need to marinate on this for a few more days...
    I am about done with a set of full coverage carbon fenders for my mukluk. All the carbon is laid up and rough trimmed so I am pretty much on the home stretch. It was A TON of work, esp making the molds, but I really enjoy working with carbon so it has also been a ton of fun. I'll make a thread about the process once I get them sorted out which should be pretty soon here.

    PS - Here is a teaser pic... yes there are two sets this round and no you can't have the other one
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Yet another fender thread-11_05_2012-1437-.jpg  

    Whatever floats your bike, dude

  87. #87
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    Yea! I knew someone out there must be making CF fenders in their well ventilated mancave. I have many questions, but I will save them for the thread
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  88. #88
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    Old skis work well too

    A quick bit of work with a drawknife, some old hardware, and presto! fenders with tips. I've fine-tuned them since I took this picture. Amazingly tough and durable.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Yet another fender thread-pugs2.jpg  


  89. #89
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    My attempt.

    Yet another fender thread-1.jpg

    Yet another fender thread-2.jpg

    Yet another fender thread-3.jpg

    Yet another fender thread-4.jpg

    Yet another fender thread-5.pg.jpg

    Yet another fender thread-6.jpg

    Yet another fender thread-7.jpg

    Yet another fender thread-8.jpg

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak View Post
    So do ^^^these^^^ great looking fenders work well?
    Just thought I'd chuck in my experiences with that sort of fender/mudguard.

    At any decent speed our big tyres can chuck a phenomenal amount of wet filth at us. On a long day this can make the difference between stopping early because you're sodden or frozen and keeping riding because it's still fun.

    Mudguards/fenders that have a good wrap around the tyre make a huge difference. About the only part of your body that's exposed is your lower leg.



    The pic is after a winter 24 hour race with some deep mud. The top half of the bike is still clean. The lower part is muddy because it is not practical to extend the mudguard lower at the front because it would catch in technical terrain. This was reflected in my condition - the lower part of my leg was mud soaked, but my upper body was dry, and therefore warm.

    In slushy conditions this can make the difference between hypothermia and comfort.

    Where I ride it's not often below -15C and more usually hovering between -10 to +5C when snow is around which means it's wet sticky stuff. The colder days are much more fun because snow is "drier" and doesn't stick so much.

    I'm contemplating adding skirts to my mudguards - like those used on ladies bikes to stop long skirts getting sucked into the spokes. There's a significant amount of fine spray comes out of the sides of the mudguards and reducing that would be a help. That would just leave the stuff hitting my lower leg, and I suspect the answer to that is motocross boots

    SImilar to this, but front and rear


    Last edited by Velobike; 11-17-2012 at 02:12 PM.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
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  91. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    ...The lower part is muddy because it is not practical to extend the mudguard lower at the front because it would catch in technical terrain. ...
    Have you tried mud flaps? I've got a huge one on the set I am building. Still trying to figure out the best way to get this on it:

    Whatever floats your bike, dude

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Okay, I'll just come out and ask for all of the people out there who don't know....what are the little red bar ends for? And you've got some kind of hub brake thing going on? Still LOVE the moto-like fenders, those look really cool

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fastskiguy View Post
    Okay, I'll just come out and ask for all of the people out there who don't know....what are the little red bar ends for? And you've got some kind of hub brake thing going on?...
    The little red bar ends are for when I have to do trackside repairs. When I flip the bike upside down they keep my levers out of the mire.

    The hub brakes are so I don't lose time changing disk brake pads during the race. In the past I've had to do a few changes of pads in this race although in others the pads last the whole 24 hours. Seeing as it's usually subzero my fingers get like sausages and what's usually a 15 minute job can take a half hour or more. The drum brakes can gain me time for a couple of extra laps otherwise wasted on maintenance. BTW the brakes were in perfect nick at he end of the race.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dustin Mustangs View Post
    Have you tried mud flaps?...
    Yes, but they keep getting jammed under the mudguard on technical stuff, or if stiff enough to stick out, get tangled with my feet.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
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  94. #94
    Lord Thunderbottom
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    Y'all Better Redneckonize

    my $10 20 min fender

    an old reflector mount, gutter end and a toilet tank trip arm
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Yet another fender thread-2012-12-19-16.45.45.jpg  

    Yet another fender thread-2012-12-19-17.22.40.jpg  

    Yet another fender thread-2012-12-19-17.22.52.jpg  

    Yet another fender thread-2012-12-19-22.52.36.jpg  


  95. #95
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    I'm a huge fan of the ghetto methods. How does the toilet arm and gutter hold up on bumpy single tracks? Does it rattle like mad?

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by boogman View Post
    I'm a huge fan of the ghetto methods. How does the toilet arm and gutter hold up on bumpy single tracks? Does it rattle like mad?
    truthfully, I haven't ridden it yet, but there's no loose parts to rattle, the parts are all pretty flexible and connected nylon/vinyl to each other, I pushed it around side to side to see what it would do in a minor crash and I keep flexing the tail end of it to try and flare it out more so it catches more crudd and it seems surprisingly more solid than it looks

    I'll have a report for you if it changes post muddy/snow ride sunday morning

  97. #97
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    Cool how did u mount the toilet arm to the gutter? Does the arm itself have mounting hole on the gutter-end?

    My challenge had been finding a suitable material thats light weight and impervious to water.. Strolling around the hardware store yielded no candidates

  98. #98
    Lord Thunderbottom
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    Here's a better picture of the toilet arm, this is the brass version obviously but same difference, it's a kohler specific replacement part, IDK if others will work as nicely



    here's a link to the exact part on amazon, I spent only $3 on it at menards, I assume lowes/home depot would be similar Amazon.com: Lasco 04-1777 Toilet Flush Lever Kohler Plastic Arm Only: Home Improvement

    it has a hole, which I made a little larger to slip the screw thru on the reflector mount end

    the other end has a flat surface and a hole/brass screw already in it, I just made the necessary hole in the gutter where needed and used the screw that came with the arm to attach it thru the gutter

  99. #99
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    If the plastic doesn't hold up it would be pretty easy to fab something like that out of the raw aluminum stock also available at menards. Just anneal it before trying any sharp bends.
    Whatever floats your bike, dude

  100. #100
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    TC - did you glue the plastic together or anything where it overlaps at the bend? I don't see a pop rivet or anything.

    I like it!

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