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  1. #1
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    Wren 150mm Tuning/Setup Guide

    My Wren is supposed to arrive soon, and I have seen lots of minor notes on other threads both in Fat Bikes and Foes about the fork. I wanted to make this single thread so riders could post what their setup is in terms if pressure, dampening, etc.

  2. #2
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    I have been riding a Wren 150mm for a month. In Cold weather and in milder Winter weather with rain. The pressure is changing significant when the temperature is changing a lot. Checked the sag latest today, and I was getting 25% sag when running 55psi on top and bottom. The bottom air Chamber can be runned a bit lower to get more small bump plushness and opposite to get more feedback from the ground. Still doing test rides at different air pressure. The confusing part is that when increasing either Chamber the other will shrink and the pressure will increase. So I think the way to og is to just fill it up so the pressure is in Balance (top/bottom) and then ad pressure. The Reading you will find different, but you need just to note the change in pressure.

  3. #3
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    Large Foes Mutz, 26 x 4" On One Floaters
    CC Inline 5.5", 130-140psi, near factory setting, a little more active LSR
    Wren 150mm, 60 psi/60psi, full open dampener control.
    Me: 195# nakid.

    First ride, ten miles on dirt single track, some out of the seat climbing, some low angle jumps, nothing significant.

    Out of the box I noticed stanchion stikiness not unlike the Bluto. The stikiness improved somewhat with riding, but could probably benefit from some more to break in. I wonder whether this stikiness could be due to having an overly slack HTA (65deg) or there's some flex related "binding" at the seals.

    The initial dampening was excessive, so much so that it noticeably slowed the leg return.

    Anyone brave enough to try and change oil in the dampener unit? Would this void the warranty?

  4. #4
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    I felt also the stickiness when it was new, but it will got away after a while. It is smooth as butter now, and had the same feeling if the head angle was the problem. I have actually dismantled the air side, and it is no signs of wear on the keys yet. The grease had changed a little bit of color some places, from white to grey, but that I think is pretty normal. They use a lot of grease in there btw. The oil is 2.5 grade, so should be thin enough- so is it necessary to get a thinner grade? How is the rebound working on your fork Nurse Ben? Mine is actually doing it going in slow motion when used at max setting. If I did not misunderstand, the damping is only interfering with the high speed compression (like the small knob on the RCT damping unit on the Bluto), not the low speed, until you go full turn, then you have a locked. That is why you do not get very little change, but it works fine for me at high speed damping.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rumblefish2010 View Post
    I felt also the stickiness when it was new, but it will got away after a while. It is smooth as butter now, and had the same feeling if the head angle was the problem. I have actually dismantled the air side, and it is no signs of wear on the keys yet. The grease had changed a little bit of color some places, from white to grey, but that I think is pretty normal. They use a lot of grease in there btw. The oil is 2.5 grade, so should be thin enough- so is it necessary to get a thinner grade? How is the rebound working on your fork Nurse Ben? Mine is actually doing it going in slow motion when used at max setting. If I did not misunderstand, the damping is only interfering with the high speed compression (like the small knob on the RCT damping unit on the Bluto), not the low speed, until you go full turn, then you have a locked. That is why you do not get very little change, but it works fine for me at high speed damping.
    I do need more ride time, but it'll have to be next weekend as the local snow is shite and I don't feel like riding gravel.

    I'll keep thrashing on it, but it has a very slow return, so that needs to change.

    Only 2.5 wt oil??

    As to the lock out, wow!, that's the first lockout I have used that actually locks the fork. I forgot to mention that in my review, but it's worthy for sure.

    I didn't seem to notice any progression in the rebound, only locked and unlocked.

  6. #6
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    I think you need to run the fork for a few weeks until it should work properly. Until it is proper broken in, you will find things it a bit strange. What do you mean with “only 2,5w”, is that oil to thick? The rebound adjustment will also change dramatic after time of use. Try to use the compression adjustment like a high speed adjustment.

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    Subcribe.

  8. #8
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    you'd definitely benefit from lighter fork oil, that should speed up rebound damping, especially in the cold. You should talk to Wren first, but someone like Max at Traxxion Dynamics ( Bicycle Suspension Services ) could improve the valving in the compression and rebound circuits. It would be custom work, but if anyone has the capability, it would be them, as they've been manufacturing cartridges for motorcycle forks for years.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rumblefish2010 View Post
    I think you need to run the fork for a few weeks until it should work properly. Until it is proper broken in, you will find things it a bit strange. What do you mean with “only 2,5w”, is that oil to thick? The rebound adjustment will also change dramatic after time of use. Try to use the compression adjustment like a high speed adjustment.
    I've had a few forks over the years, so the idea of break in is not new to me. The Wren takes break-in to another level, which suggests that break-in alone is not going to be enough, but time will tell. If I had a machine that could cycle the fork a few thousand times, that would be an interesting before and after test.

    5-10wt oil is typical, so 2.5wt is pretty light, which is why I was wondering if that is accurate. If it is only 2.5wt, that makes going to a lighter weight oil kinda tough.

    The Damper is a closed unit, so I'm not sure what can be done to improve it other than a redesign. I can't imagine that Wren wants to send their forks to a custom shop for revalving, though one user has already done that.

    I'm not prepared to send my brand new fork to a custom shop, that seems like a strange proposition ... shouldn't the fork work as designed?

    The Compression damper didn't work except as a lockout, so I just left it open. Same with the dampener adjuster, it didn't really work, so I left it open.

    I'd like to hear more from the Foes guys who tested the fork initially...did they start with a broken in fork or did they do an install straight from the box? Was it a production Wren? Did they make any changes? Did they notice any break in issues?

    If I had tried this fork new on a floor model bike, I would have passed. If break in proves you right, then we'll see that in time. I already paid the piper, so I'll ride it until I don't.

  10. #10
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    I have one of the 150mm forks. It was more or less DOA out of the box. Problems with the air spring, problems with the damper, problems with the seals and seal heads.

    To their credit, Wren have been great to talk to and are having me send the fork to Jerry @ Hippie Tech (on their dime -- parts, labor, and shipping both ways) to diagnose and fix.

    I'll be out of the shop starting Monday, and for the next few weeks, so it'll be early Feb before I can get the fork back and ridden. Will check back in here then.

  11. #11
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    I just spoke to Russ at Wren central, I told him about my damper issues, he's going to check with the factory. Since my damper adjuster only turns ~3.5 rotations and my lock out is functional, he does not believe the fork was assembled incorrectly. He may send me a replacement damper cartridge.

    Russ said that future forks will be shipped with a travel adjustment clip "pack" consisting of a 10mm and 20mm clip, this will allow reducing travel to 140mm, 130mm, or 120
    Last edited by Nurse Ben; 01-15-2016 at 11:03 AM.

  12. #12
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    The Clip that followed the fork is only limitating the travel, it is not lowering the fork.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rumblefish2010 View Post
    The Clip that followed the fork is only limitating the travel, it is not lowering the fork.
    THE CLIPS DO CHANGE FORK LENGTH.

    Clarification from WREN:

    "Hi Ben!
    Yes the clips reduce travel and length. You can stop down to 140, 130 or 120. Use 1-10mm to go to 140, use 1 - 20mm to go to 130 and use both to go to 120. When using the 20mm it always goes on first and right up against the top of the air spring. The 20mm has one more open side, that side goes on top (faces up). If you use both, the 10mm goes under the 20.

    Regards,

    Russ Johnson
    Wren Sports, LLC"

  14. #14
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    Okay, that was good to clarify then. I was certain the Clip will only be a bump stop, limitating the travel- I must have misunderstood what has been said and how it Works. Sorry for that! It says "stop Down" but I assume it should be step Down??

  15. #15
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    No worries, I think this design is a big positive to the Wren, changing travel on a Bluto is time consuming and not free. With thd Wren you could easilly use this fork across multiple platforms or use the ease of travel adjustment to play with "trim".

  16. #16
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    Think I have found out a way to fill air in the fork now. Fill the air Chambers With similar air pressure in both Chambers. Start then to increase or decrease the air pressure in the bottom air Chamber. Think about the bottom air Chamber as you will add or remove tokens to an ordinary fork. This means you will be able to find the accurate bottom out resistance, since you can just dial in by a small amount of change of pressure with the pump. The compression knob works on my fork, but it is not working really progressive. You can feel small clicks on the knob, but it actually is 100% locking in the two last clicks. I wished it was more progressiv before it was locked in the last click. You can feel a small bit of change in compression. It is added a small portion of compression only, when you start from zero and go click by click. The rebound is working too good, going into a to small movement after 2 turns. I Wonder if it Could be too little or too much oil in the fork, causing these problems???
    Last edited by Rumblefish2010; 01-17-2016 at 03:10 AM.

  17. #17
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    Sorry for knagging about these, but I cannot se how these travel Clips, could reduse length of the fork, when you look at the drawing. If I am correct, the Clip will sit on top to the left, that is not at the part that is not moving. I cannot see how to With a Clip to change the length??Wren 150mm Tuning/Setup Guide-wren-fork.jpg

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rumblefish2010 View Post
    Sorry for knagging about these, but I cannot se how these travel Clips, could reduse length of the fork, when you look at the drawing. If I am correct, the Clip will sit on top to the left, that is not at the part that is not moving. I cannot see how to With a Clip to change the length??Click image for larger version. 

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    Nor can I, but the clips are on the way, I'm going to reduce travel to 140mm, so I'll let you know how it works.

    No rides this past week, doing a big two bathroom remodel, weather has been spotty, I'm heading to Spokane this Wednesday for a vet visit, dropping the dog off for the day, so I'll scout some trails and give the Wren a good workout.

    Even though there are some quirks with the Wren, I still like it much better than the Bluto.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Nor can I, but the clips are on the way, I'm going to reduce travel to 140mm, so I'll let you know how it works.

    No rides this past week, doing a big two bathroom remodel, weather has been spotty, I'm heading to Spokane this Wednesday for a vet visit, dropping the dog off for the day, so I'll scout some trails and give the Wren a good workout.

    Even though there are some quirks with the Wren, I still like it much better than the Bluto.
    I have been riding Wren Down to 0 fahrenheit now, and it is still no issues. The Bluto did all kind of strange Things....I do not even compare it With the Bluto.....

  20. #20
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    I had a nice mixed ride today, corny snow, dirt, rock, pine duff, nothing too serious but it gave me more time to play with the air pressures and increase break in.

    I tried running higher pressure in the lower (75psi) and lower pressure in the upper (50 psi ) and the end result was a very supple fork with 25-30% sag, no issues with bottoming out.

    I know it's not supposed to work that way, but it seemed to make the fork function as deigned. The only way I could get the same level of "suppleness" was using lower pressures on top and bottom, which slowed rebound.

    I also tried 50psi on top and zero psi on the bottom, what was strange is that it didn't feel that much different from 50psi/50psi.

    So, in summary, I do like the fork, it is stiff and burly, the dampening seems to be improving (break in?), and I have been able to dial in a decent level of function. A real test will be an all day ride at Tiger, but the weather ain't gonna be warm and dry for a while.

    St. George in March!

    and yes Dorothy, the Wren is oodles better than the Bluto. In fact, it's so good that I'd buy one

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    and yes Dorothy, the Wren is oodles better than the Bluto. In fact, it's so good that I'd buy one

    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    If I had tried this fork new on a floor model bike, I would have passed. If break in proves you right, then we'll see that in time. I already paid the piper, so I'll ride it until I don't.
    Im glad to see your opinion changed in one week.

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    As I read all these observations, adjustments, and what not, I couldn't help but think... "Why can't they just make a plug and play fork that would serve its purpose and my objectives in the first mile and the thousandt mile without me having to take a degree in engineering?"

    I guess I will pass on this one and stick with the steel ICT fork.

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    Don't shoot, but I think those that are the pickiest about fork performance are those that tend to have the skill set to make modifications.

    For those of us laymen that aren't as comfortable tearing a fork apart, I suspect we notice less and aren't as sensitive to the forks function.

    But that's just my guess.

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    We the people ...

    Has it been a week already?

    Nope, two weeks, but who's counting

    I still think the rebound is slow, but I have seen some improvement and varying the pressure in a "weird way" has been an interesting experiment.

    The Bluto is just so bad, I mean who in their right mind would put a Reba level fork on a big hit bike? Anyway, the point is that the Bluto was such a poor choice for this aplicatiopn that it would n't take much to improve the situation.

    The Wren checks off most of the boxes:

    Stiff/Robust
    Not too heavy
    Long travel
    Not too expensive
    150mm TA
    Responsive mfg
    No stiction

    The only question remaining is the slow rebound and quirky damper. I think the rebound is improving with use, I think playing with pressures has made a difference, and I'm confident that Wren will make this fork happen.

    Buying a fork like the Wren is still a crap shoot no matter how you cut it. Wren is a small company and this is their only fork; they are not a suspension mfg. per se.

    More to come as I get ride time on non snowy surface

    Quote Originally Posted by kntr View Post
    Im glad to see your opinion changed in one week.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shinkers View Post
    Don't shoot, but I think those that are the pickiest about fork performance are those that tend to have the skill set to make modifications.

    For those of us laymen that aren't as comfortable tearing a fork apart, I suspect we notice less and aren't as sensitive to the forks function.

    But that's just my guess.
    Nah, I suck

    I'd call myself an "every person" rider, I'm not great, I ride hard, I've been riding wheel contraption for a long time, I work on my own stuff, and I know a few things about how things work.

    I don't want anyone making a choice because I misled them, so I tell what I think, sometimes I change my mind, but for the most part I say what I believe is true.

    It would be wonderful if we had a "ready to go burly fork", but this is just a fringe area of biking that hasn't seen a lot of play, so we just gotta go with it.

    It could be worse, we could be talking about telemark bindings...

    Nah, don't go there

  26. #26
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    For me the Wren fork is the only option, since I am riding fat bike all year round With wide tires (4.8" is too wide for boost forks), there is no other. The Bluto was just making me angry

    I think Wren have the ambitions to make these fork work regarding rebound and compression.

    I mean it is a positive thing that it is exactly a small manufacturer behind these fork, it would have been a totally different story With one of the big manufacturers. They would give a damn about feedback from the customers.....

  27. #27
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    I have just got the user manual for the fork, and there is ONLY travel adjustment limiting options, not a travel length adjustment. The Clip is pushing the bumper that stops the travel lower, to limit the travel. That confirms what I meant before from the drawing of the fork and where the Clips sits. Here is from the user manual:

    "Before your first ride you should check if you have enough tire to crown clearance. This
    fork comes standard with either 110 mm or 150 mm of travel from the factory. If you are
    using narrow rims and big tires, you must check if you have enough clearance between
    your crown and tire before you ride with this fork. If you do not have enough clearance,
    the air spring needs to be modified with a stopper(s) that will give you the proper
    clearance. Stoppers are sold separately and can modify the travel in 10 mm increments.
    !
    150 mm of travel - pre-set at factory
    For 140 mm of travel - remove the pre-installed 10 mm clip and insert 1 - 20 mm clip.
    For 130 mm of travel - leave the 20 mm clip in place and add the 10 mm UNDERNEATH. The
    20 mm must be on top."

  28. #28
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    Yes, it doesn't make sense, I read the same info in an email I got from Wren.

    I'll ask my buddy what he thinks; he's an ex Manitou fork team engineer.

    How does the Dorado adjust by using air pressure? Could that be part of the equation?
    Quote Originally Posted by Rumblefish2010 View Post
    I have just got the user manual for the fork, and there is ONLY travel adjustment limiting options, not a travel length adjustment. The Clip is pushing the bumper that stops the travel lower, to limit the travel. That confirms what I meant before from the drawing of the fork and where the Clips sits. Here is from the user manual:

    "Before your first ride you should check if you have enough tire to crown clearance. This
    fork comes standard with either 110 mm or 150 mm of travel from the factory. If you are
    using narrow rims and big tires, you must check if you have enough clearance between
    your crown and tire before you ride with this fork. If you do not have enough clearance,
    the air spring needs to be modified with a stopper(s) that will give you the proper
    clearance. Stoppers are sold separately and can modify the travel in 10 mm increments.
    !
    150 mm of travel - pre-set at factory
    For 140 mm of travel - remove the pre-installed 10 mm clip and insert 1 - 20 mm clip.
    For 130 mm of travel - leave the 20 mm clip in place and add the 10 mm UNDERNEATH. The
    20 mm must be on top."

  29. #29
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    I'm very interested in whether a travel adjustment alters the a-c height. 570mm is a non starter for me, it's just too much of a jump from the relatively low a-c of the bluto

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N910A using Tapatalk
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  30. #30
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    I sent an email to Russ, he's been pretty responsive, I'll let you know...

    Quote Originally Posted by rollertoaster View Post
    I'm very interested in whether a travel adjustment alters the a-c height. 570mm is a non starter for me, it's just too much of a jump from the relatively low a-c of the bluto

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N910A using Tapatalk

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    How did you guys mount the carbon leg guards? I was thinking a small piece of tube and two zip ties per leg.... but any suggestions would be great. Thanks.

  32. #32
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    Double sided tape and zip ties.

    Quote Originally Posted by JCHKeys View Post
    How did you guys mount the carbon leg guards? I was thinking a small piece of tube and two zip ties per leg.... but any suggestions would be great. Thanks.

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    And just to make sure, it only fits on the bottom 1/2 inch of the actual stantion, and not the base fitting where the axle mounts....

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCHKeys View Post
    And just to make sure, it only fits on the bottom 1/2 inch of the actual stantion, and not the base fitting where the axle mounts....
    Yes. On the Stanchion, I measured the travel and it stops with enough stanchion remaining to mount the guards.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    I sent an email to Russ, he's been pretty responsive, I'll let you know...
    Russ wrote back, he said he was mistaken, travel changes but length does not change fork length:

    "Hi Ben!

    Sorry it took so long to get back to you I’ve been traveling today. First, I must apologize that I gave you bad info last time. Out travel clips limit travel only, do not affect AC. Our clips clip onto the air spring rod outside of the air chamber. Not sure what I was thinking at the time. We offer the Wren fork in 505, 530 and 570 AC lengths to work with most frame geometries. Hope this helps. Sorry for the brain fade earlier!"

    I wrote Russ back and asked him if there would be air shafts available for changing fork length, no response yet.

  36. #36
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    So I mounted up my Wren and did the first test right last night. There is definitely a loose feel, but side by side with my other fat bike with a Bluto, doing the simple test of holding the front wheel with my knees and turning the handlebars, there was a difference. The wren had a very loose feeling for about 3/4 inch turn of the handlebars, but then became solid and wouldn't move any more. The bluto felt like a wet noodle where I could put more force and keep twisting the handlebars.

    So are the Wren doesn't have as much breaking twist as the Bluto, but this has only been street riding as my trails still have a foot of snow on them.

    Has anyone gotten their fork back from any servicing by Wren or Hippie Tech? Were they able to fix this looseness?

    Oh and when I dumped out the Wren box, two awesome clamps for the carbon guards dropped out, so much nicer than my hokie zip ties.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Russ wrote back, he said he was mistaken, travel changes but length does not change fork length:

    "Hi Ben!

    Sorry it took so long to get back to you I’ve been traveling today. First, I must apologize that I gave you bad info last time. Out travel clips limit travel only, do not affect AC. Our clips clip onto the air spring rod outside of the air chamber. Not sure what I was thinking at the time. We offer the Wren fork in 505, 530 and 570 AC lengths to work with most frame geometries. Hope this helps. Sorry for the brain fade earlier!"

    I wrote Russ back and asked him if there would be air shafts available for changing fork length, no response yet.
    This is a major bummer for me. I was hoping to run a 150mm @ 130mm with an a-c of 550 (+19mm from my 120mm bluto). I can only wait and hope they make a shorter air shaft to allow a more reasonable a-c height.

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  38. #38
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    Yes, you can have your cake and eat it too!

    Russell got back to me "again" and he said that there is a way to change A-C when travel is reduced. He had re-writen the manual to include text that describes the process. I'll post the revised manual when I get to work on Tuesday, in the meantime I will post yhe added text:

    Air Spring Travel and AC Length Modification and Assembly:
    You can reduce travel and the AC Length of the fork by placing the travel clips INSIDE the air spring.
    1. Follow steps 1 through 4 above to remove the stanchion with the air spring from the fork. Be sure ALL air is
    released from the air spring.
    2. Looking at the top of the air spring, you will see a silver cap with 2 holes. This is the stanchion assembly cap.
    Using a pair of bent nose pliers in the holes, unscrew the cap completely.
    3. Grip the top of the air spring firmly and pull it out of the stanchion. This may take some effort.
    4. Locate the Small Steel Spring at the bottom of the air spring. The clips will be installed on TOP of that spring
    and below the white plastic bumper above that spring. The clips snap onto the rod same as above.
    5. If only one clip is used, it must be the 20 mm clip because it is designed to rest on the spring. Remember that
    the wide-mouth side of the 20 mm clip must face up. The 10 mm clip should only be used with the 20 mm clip
    and must be installed on TOP of the 20 mm clip.
    6. Be sure the Large Steel Spring is well greased. All coils should be “filled” with grease. If riding in cold
    weather, be sure to use a grease specified for use in the temperature you will be riding in.
    7. Lightly grease the air piston seals and insert the air spring back into the stanchion. CAREFULLY thread the
    stanchion assembly cap back into the stanchion making sure not to cross thread the cap. Tighten securely
    with the bent nose pliers.
    8. Now reverse steps 1 to 4 from the travel modification section and install the stanchion into the fork. Be sure to
    check your air pressure.


    Quote Originally Posted by rollertoaster View Post
    This is a major bummer for me. I was hoping to run a 150mm @ 130mm with an a-c of 550 (+19mm from my 120mm bluto). I can only wait and hope they make a shorter air shaft to allow a more reasonable a-c height.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N910A using Tapatalk

  39. #39
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    Here's the revised Wren manual, sorry for the low quality and lack of formatting

    Page 1
    Wren
    Inverted
    Suspension
    Fork
    with Keyed Stanchions

    and TwinAir System
    Owners Manual
    ________________________________________
    Page 2
    Congratulations!
    You have just purchased a Wren Inverted Suspension Fork. The culmination of years of design, testing and riding.
    Please read this entire owner’s manual carefully before riding to learn about all the possibilities this fork
    offers to you. Please make sure that you follow the safety and maintenance instructions strictly.
    Quick explanation of the fork
    Modular Fork:
    This fork is assembled and designed from a modular point of view. This means all parts can be exchanged for
    new parts when needed. These parts can be ordered from your local dealer or service center. However, we prefer
    that the exchange of parts and any service to internal parts be done by one of the certified service centers that we
    have appointed. If your country has no service center available, the fork may be returned to our factory for
    service. If a fork is serviced by anyone other than a certified service center, the consumer warranty will void.
    Please refer to page 5 for complete fork description.
    Fork Features
    Hydraulic Damping with Adjustable Compression and Rebound (right leg):
    The hydraulic oil damper is a sealed unit and designed to be replaced by a certified service center. You can
    modify the fork’s ride feel by changing the presets as described later in this manual.
    Air Spring (left leg):
    The air damper is fully serviceable and all parts are replaceable. We strongly recommend that this be done by a
    certified service center. However, if you have good wrenching skills, you can do this yourself (check the
    performance tuning section before doing this).
    Dropouts and Quick Release:
    This fork is made for QR15 hubs only and has a specific QR which is supplied with the fork and works with all
    QR15 front hubs that fit your fork. Wheel installation on an inverted fork can be a bit tricky compared to regular
    forks and requires attention. Before you insert the wheel, make sure both legs are at the same level and the
    dropouts are facing forward, this makes QR assembly easier.
    Warranty
    The original manufacturer warrants this fork for a period of two years from the date of purchase to be free from
    defects in materials or workmanship for the first owner only. During this warranty period we will replace or repair
    any defective component of the fork. Paint, anodizing or seal damage caused by normal use (“wear and tear”) are
    not covered by this warranty. We shall not be held liable for any damage caused by a crash, insufficient
    maintenance or ignorance of the safety and maintenance instructions. We shall not be held liable for normal
    maintenance, damage or failure due to abuse or misuse.
    Important Safety and Maintenance Instructions
    Warning:
    It is extremely important that your Wren Inverted Fork be installed correctly by a dealer. Incorrectly installed forks
    are dangerous and can result in loss of control of the bicycle and severe and/or fatal injuries. Follow the
    instructions below to avoid this. If you do not follow these instructions, your warranty will be void.
    Maintenance:
    To maintain safety, long life and high performance of your Wren Inverted Fork, periodic maintenance is required. If
    you frequently join competitions, ride in wet, muddy or other extreme conditions, a 50% reduction in
    recommended maintenance intervals listed below is necessary.
    1. After every ride clean and dry the exterior of your fork.
    Page 2
    ________________________________________
    Page 3
    2. Minimum every 25 hours of riding you should check the smoothness of your fork. The stanchions need to run
    smoothly up and down the seals. If they do not run smoothly, put 2-3 drops of a Teflon-based oil on the
    stanchions and move them up and down through the compression stroke (this is easier when you release
    some air pressure through the air valve).
    3. Check if all dials and nuts are still tightened properly.
    4. Check the stanchion tubes for scratches and also inspect the lower seals for any wear or tear. If one of the
    above mentioned parts appears damaged, do not ride and send your fork to a certified service center.
    5. After 100 hours of riding, your fork should be fully serviced by a certified service center. You may contact your
    dealer or Wren directly in order to find a certified service center.
    General instructions:
    1. This Wren fork is designed for off-road use. It is not designed for excessive riding like extreme jumps, etc. To
    use it on-road, you will have to follow your country’s specific traffic regulations and laws and equip your bike
    and your fork accordingly.
    2. Do not ride your bike if you notice technical problems or material failures like bending, cracking or broken
    parts. Immediately take your bike to a qualified dealer to prevent further damage. Failure to do this may result
    in damage and severe and/or fatal injury.
    3. Make sure the quick release lever is tightened and the hub axle is correctly fixed in the bore of the dropouts.
    When the quick release is locked, the lever should point backwards in the horizontal position on the post
    mount disc brake side of the fork.
    4. Adjust the headset until there is no play or drag.
    5. Install the brakes according to the manufacturers instructions and adjust brake pads properly. Use the fork
    only with brakes that fit to the existing brake mounts and use up to a 160 mm rotor. For larger rotors up to a
    maximum of 180 mm, use a proper post mount adapter for installation. Before riding the bicycle, ensure the
    brakes are properly installed and working properly.
    6. Do not add threads to the thread-less steerer tube.
    7. Do not replace the steerer tube by yourself as it needs to be pressed in under very high pressure.
    8. Do not disassemble the oil cartridge (right side leg) yourself. High pressure inside the cartridge may cause
    injuries and disassembly may lead to damage. Only an authorized service center should disassemble the oil
    cartridge. The air side of the fork may be disassembled in order to modify the fork’s travel in 10 mm
    increments. This is done by installing stoppers, sold separately. This may be needed to make sure that your
    tire does not hit the crown while the fork is fully compressed when using bigger volume tires. This must be
    checked properly before each first ride with a different tire width or height. Generally, the 135 mm hub fork can
    fit up to a 4” tire and the 150 mm hub fork can fit up to a 5” tire. Every rim tire combination can fit differently so
    you must check your travel and clearance. See page 7 for how to modify travel.
    9. Disassembly, maintenance and replacement of the oil damper must be made by an authorized service center.
    10. Avoid directing water pressure at the stanchions and/or seals.
    11. Be cautious when mounting the bicycle to a carrier. Carriers that hold the bike in trays with the wheels on are
    preferred. Follow the instructions of the carrier manufacturer. Avoid mounting the bike by fixing it at the
    dropouts (front wheel removed). The dropouts could be damaged.
    12. If your bike is transported by air, release the air pressure from the air spring side of the fork before packing.
    Deflating the air spring before transport avoids pressure damage and will guarantee proper function after
    transport.
    13. After a crash, have your bike and your fork inspected by a qualified dealer as internal damage may occur.
    14. Always use genuine Wren parts. Use of different parts voids the warranty and could cause structural failure of
    the fork resulting in loss of control of the bike with possible damage and/or injuries.
    Page 3
    ________________________________________
    Page 4

    Page 4
    Air Spring Insert
    Complete Fork Description
    Axle Nut
    Axle
    QR Lever
    Wren Inverted Suspension Fork
    QR15 Quick Release Axle
    Steerer Tube
    Red Air Spring Cap
    Blue Air Cap
    Crown
    Red Oil
    Damper Cap
    Oil Seals
    Stanchion Tubes
    Upper Legs
    Red Rebound Dial
    Right Dropout -
    Rebound Side
    Left Dropout -
    Brake Side
    Post Mount
    Brake Mount
    Blue
    Compression/
    Lockout Lever
    Serial Number
    Red Valve Cap - only
    on TwinAir forks
    Upper Assembly
    Cap Nut
    Air Valve
    Travel Clip
    (if installed)
    Bumper
    (various sizes)
    Air Spring Rod
    Stanchion
    Assembly Cap
    Air Piston
    Travel Limiter with
    Large Steel Spring
    Small Steel Spring
    ________________________________________
    Page 5
    AIR Spring Travel and AC Length Modifications
    Before your first ride you should check if you have enough tire to crown clearance. Depending on the
    model, this fork comes standard with either 100 mm (505 mm AC), 110 mm (530 mm AC) or 150 mm (570
    mm AC) of travel from the factory. If you are using narrow rims and big tires, you must check if you have
    enough clearance between your crown and tire before you ride with this fork. If you do not have enough
    clearance, the air spring needs to be modified with a clip(s) that will give you the proper clearance. Clips
    are now supplied with every fork. If you have an older fork, you may contact us to purchase clips. The
    clips reduce travel or travel and AC Length in 10 mm increments. As an example:
    150 mm of travel - pre-set at factory
    For 140 mm of travel - remove the pre-installed 10 mm clip and insert 1 - 20 mm clip.
    For 130 mm of travel - leave the 20 mm clip in place and add the 10 mm clip ABOVE the 20 mm clip. The 10 mm
    clip must always be on top.
    110 mm of travel - pre-set at the factory
    For 100 mm of travel - remove the pre-installed 10 mm clip and insert 1 - 20 mm clip.
    For 90 mm of travel - leave the 20 mm clip in place and add the 10 mm clip ABOVE. The 10 mm clip must be on
    top.
    100 mm of travel - pre-set at the factory
    For 90 mm of travel - remove the pre-installed 10 mm clip and insert 1 - 20 mm clip.
    For 80 mm of travel - leave the 20 mm clip in place and add the 10 mm clip ABOVE. The 10 mm clip must be on
    top.
    Checking for Crown to Tire Clearance:
    1. Install the front wheel on the fork being sure tire is properly inflated.
    2. Release air from the air spring to make fork easier to compress.
    3. Push down on the handlebars until the fork bottoms out and check for the amount of clearance between crown
    and tire. A minimum of 5 mm is recommended.
    Air Spring Travel Modification and Assembly:
    1. Place your bike in a work stand and remove the front wheel.
    2. Remove the blue air cap from the left leg and release all the air from the system. If your fork is a TwinAir, be
    sure to empty both top and bottom air chambers.
    3. Loosen and carefully remove the air spring assembly cap (large silver nut below the blue air cap) with a 26
    mm socket. DO NOT remove the red air spring assembly cap.
    4. Unscrew the seals from the stanchions by hand. Now the air spring can be pulled out including the air side
    stanchion from the bottom of the fork.
    Warning: At this stage please absolutely make sure again that all the air has been released from the air
    spring unit to avoid severe and/or fatal injuries.
    5. Select the correct stopper(s) as discussed above.
    6. Insert the proper stopper size into the air spring at the top directly below the upper assembly cap and onto the
    flattened sides of the rod. For a 10 mm stopper, snap onto the rod and slide up over the flattened surfaces of
    the upper assembly cap. For the 20 mm stopper, be sure the wide-mouth end is at the top, facing up. This end
    is chamfered to fit over the flattened surfaces. Lineup with the flattened surfaces and snap onto the rod. If
    using both stoppers, be sure the 10 mm is on top.
    7. Reverse steps 1 to 4 for reassembly. Be sure to torque the air spring assembly cap to 10Nm. Be sure the fork
    seals are hand tight. Be sure to check your air pressure and sag.
    Page 5
    ________________________________________
    Page 6
    Air Spring Travel and AC Length Modification and Assembly:
    You can reduce travel and the AC Length of the fork by placing the travel clips INSIDE the air spring.
    1. Follow steps 1 through 4 above to remove the stanchion with the air spring from the fork. Be sure ALL air is
    released from the air spring.
    2. Looking at the top of the air spring, you will see a silver cap with 2 holes. This is the stanchion assembly cap.
    Using a pair of bent nose pliers in the holes, unscrew the cap completely.
    3. Grip the top of the air spring firmly and pull it out of the stanchion. This may take some effort.
    4. Locate the Small Steel Spring at the bottom of the air spring. The clips will be installed on TOP of that spring
    and below the white plastic bumper above that spring. The clips snap onto the rod same as above.
    5. If only one clip is used, it must be the 20 mm clip because it is designed to rest on the spring. Remember that
    the wide-mouth side of the 20 mm clip must face up. The 10 mm clip should only be used with the 20 mm clip
    and must be installed on TOP of the 20 mm clip.
    6. Be sure the Large Steel Spring is well greased. All coils should be “filled” with grease. If riding in cold
    weather, be sure to use a grease specified for use in the temperature you will be riding in.
    7. Lightly grease the air piston seals and insert the air spring back into the stanchion. CAREFULLY thread the
    stanchion assembly cap back into the stanchion making sure not to cross thread the cap. Tighten securely
    with the bent nose pliers.
    8. Now reverse steps 1 to 4 from the travel modification section and install the stanchion into the fork. Be sure to
    check your air pressure and sag.
    Fork Setup/Performance Tuning
    Please follow these instructions if you want to modify the ride or feel of this fork. For additional information, please
    ask your dealer or contact Wren directly.
    After installing the fork on your bike correctly, you must determine the correct fork setup for your weight and riding
    style. First step is to inflate the fork because the fork is shipped with less air than you need to ride (air freight
    requires forks at very low or no air pressure). Remember, the following is a guide. The final settings are
    determined by paying attention to the feel of the fork and adjusting over your first few rides.
    Air Spring - TwinAir
    If your fork is equipped with an air valve on the bottom of the Air side (left) leg, you have a TwinAir fork. This fork
    has air valves top and bottom under protective caps. Begin by filling both chambers with 30psi as a STARTING
    point to set your sag (see below). Adjusting the pressure up or down in the top or bottom chamber affects slow
    speed compression. This can help smooth out the small stuff. Once sag is set, increasing air in the top chamber
    will give the fork a plusher feel, increasing air in the bottom chamber gives the fork a stiffer feel. The only way you
    will know for sure how it affects your ride is to play with it on your first few rides. Maximum air pressure is
    120psi.
    Air Spring - Single Air
    If you have a single air valve on top of the left leg, you have a single air fork. Remove the blue air valve cap and
    use a suspension pump to pump up the fork to 30 psi as a starting point. Push down on the fork a few times to
    determine if it feels about right for you. Adjust pressure if necessary. Maximum air pressure is 120psi. Now
    check for the proper sag.
    Fork Sag Setup:
    Sag is the amount of travel that is used when a rider sits on the bike and the suspension compresses under the
    rider’s weight. Sag, also known as negative travel, is needed to achieve a well-functioning fork. Sag on this fork
    should be around 20% of the fork’s travel. This can be easily measured by first locating the rubber o-rings on the
    stanchion tubes. Be sure no one is on the bike and the fork is uncompressed. Slide the o-rings up against the
    seals. Now carefully sit on the bike in your riding position with all your gear and let your weight slowly compress
    the fork. Do not bounce the fork. Carefully dismount being sure not to compress the fork. Now measure the
    distance between the o-rings and the seals. If the distance for the 110mm travel fork is around 22mm, your
    starting sag setup is good. If the distance is less than 22 mm, reduce the air pressure in the air spring. If the
    distance is more than 22 mm, increase the air pressure in the air spring. Remember, for a TwinAir fork add or
    decrease pressure equally when setting your sag. This is now your starting point. Adjustments from here need to
    be done as you ride and feel out your new fork.
    Page 6
    ________________________________________
    Page 7
    Rebound Knob:
    The rebound speed of the hydraulic damper can be fine-tuned by turning the external red knob at the bottom of
    the right leg. Turn the knob clockwise for slower rebound. Slower rebound means that the outward movement of
    the fork after compression is slower (the damping is higher). Turn the knob counter-clockwise for faster rebound.
    Faster rebound brings the fork back to its original position faster. For bumpy rides, we recommend a fast setting to
    avoid over-damping. To start, try setting the Rebound knob to the middle setting.
    Do not turn the rebound knob past its limits. Squishy sounds in the sealed rebound stages are normal, it’s just the
    oil flowing back into the compression stage of the cartridge. This means your fork works! If you choose a faster
    rebound setting, the squishy noise will lessen and the fork will bounce back to its extended position faster, but the
    damping will become less.
    Lockout / Compression Adjustment Lever:
    In addition to the rebound adjustment, the fork can be completely locked out from compression by the lockout
    system. Just turn the blue lockout lever clockwise until its limit to lock out the fork (do not move past this limit). We
    recommend this when climbing uphill or when no front suspension is needed. A very slight inward movement of
    the fork may appear even when the lockout is activated. This is required to avoid damage to the cartridge and the
    fork. To unlock the lockout function, turn the lockout lever counter-clockwise (do not move past the fully open
    limit).
    In between the two limits (fully open / locked) is the compression adjustment range.
    The compression becomes firmer when the lever is turned clockwise toward the lockout and softer when turned
    counter-clockwise toward the fully open position.
    First Ride
    It is advised to ride the fork on a flat surface at first in order to make any adjustments necessary to achieve the
    ride you want. A new fork will have slight seal friction. Seals and stanchions need to break in and after a few hours
    of riding the fork will move up and down smoother. If this changes the feeling you want, simply readjust your
    settings. On your first off-road ride, it is advised to bring a suspension pump in order to be able to make additional
    adjustments if needed.
    Thank you for purchasing the Wren Inverted Suspension Fork. To see other fine Wren products, please visit
    www.wrensports.com. Should you ever have any questions, comments or just need more information, please
    contact us at:
    WREN SPORTS, LLC
    106 Camino Del Sol, Vallejo, CA 94591
    707-652-2737
    www.wrensports.com

    Page 7
    ________________________________________
    Wren 150mm Tuning/Setup Guide-wren-3.jpg


    => If anyone wants the PDF, send me a PM with your email and I'll reply with the attachment.

  40. #40
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    That is awesome! Then this fork is a Clear Winner of Fat Bike forks. Will try to lower Down to 140mm AC, to see if that fits the Foes Mutz better. Now it is a bit hig in the front, when climbing. There is so easy to open and take out air damper that you will only use 15 minutes to put in the Clips. I will also get a New compression damper, though the original Works, but it is a bit tricky to adjust sinci it is really progressive the last 4mm of the adjustment knob. Starting to love the feel of these fork now, and I am getting hold of the air pressure adjustment also. Running 55psi in both Chambers. Before I used a 150mm travel Pike on my skinny FS, I would say the Wren fork is more rigid and stiff then the pike.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCHKeys View Post
    So I mounted up my Wren and did the first test right last night. There is definitely a loose feel, but side by side with my other fat bike with a Bluto, doing the simple test of holding the front wheel with my knees and turning the handlebars, there was a difference. The wren had a very loose feeling for about 3/4 inch turn of the handlebars, but then became solid and wouldn't move any more. The bluto felt like a wet noodle where I could put more force and keep twisting the handlebars.

    So are the Wren doesn't have as much breaking twist as the Bluto, but this has only been street riding as my trails still have a foot of snow on them.

    Has anyone gotten their fork back from any servicing by Wren or Hippie Tech? Were they able to fix this looseness?

    Oh and when I dumped out the Wren box, two awesome clamps for the carbon guards dropped out, so much nicer than my hokie zip ties.
    I can not see any reason to bother with the loosness feel of twisting the fork between Your hands and legs since The fork is as stiff and rigid as a dual Crown fork when riding it!!!

  42. #42
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    Its a simple and easy test to check the overall stiffness of the front end of a bike. I do the bikes in my stables and other peoples bikes in my club, and sometimes its amazing. Example, I got one of the first 130mm travel Fox Floats back in 2004ish. I took off a 20mm Sherman fork to put this fox on; whereas the Sherman had maybe 1/2 to 3/4 inch movement at the handlebar, the QR Fox had a solid 1.5-2 inch movement... and it showed on the trail. This test also quickly shows you if its fork, hub, or rim by looking down and seeing what moves. This has lead to countless hub repairs and spoke tightenings...

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCHKeys View Post
    Its a simple and easy test to check the overall stiffness of the front end of a bike. I do the bikes in my stables and other peoples bikes in my club, and sometimes its amazing. Example, I got one of the first 130mm travel Fox Floats back in 2004ish. I took off a 20mm Sherman fork to put this fox on; whereas the Sherman had maybe 1/2 to 3/4 inch movement at the handlebar, the QR Fox had a solid 1.5-2 inch movement... and it showed on the trail. This test also quickly shows you if its fork, hub, or rim by looking down and seeing what moves. This has lead to countless hub repairs and spoke tightenings...
    I was also observing the same when checking the fork like you tell me, but when riding the fork, it feels as stiff and rigid as the Rock Shocks Pike in 29er 150mm, so what is the problem then? When is it likeliy to believe Your Wheel is put up to forces like this? When do you put Your Wheel between two tree legs and twist the handlebar at the same time?? Or when do you Place Your Wheel into mud or rock that Locks Your Wheel sideways like you are doing? If the Wheel is locked With a 15mm axle to the fork, why should the hub or spokes be affected by these kind of forces? Why should it be possible to run a cannondale fork With one leg then, since that is not supposed to be stiff or rigid at all, and should destroy hubs and spokes like nothing else?

  44. #44
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    My fork was replaced by the factory last week. They didn't have time to pull it apart and diagnose the issues I was experiencing, which is kind of a bummer. I like having answers.

    But I also like having a fork that works as advertised, and the replacement feels great after one short ride. Suiting up to take the long, trail-version of my commute into work right now, at 6*f, which should be a good test of the cold weather oil and grease they're using.

    One thing I'm not at all clear on is how to use the top and bottom air chambers to tune the fork. Russ gave me a verbal answer to this but it wasn't very clear, and the fiddling I've done (on the old, bad fork) achieved nothing of note other than to take the fork from feeling like crap to feeling like rigid.

  45. #45
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    How's the rebound?

    Is it still too damp?

    Does it feel like it's slow to return?

    I tried using higher pressure in the lower and low pressure in the upper, this made it more supple but rebound is still slow; damper?

    When I play with the new uninstalled damper, twisting the rod that attaches to the damper adjuster in the lower leg, I don't notice much difference in how the damping effect changes...

    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    My fork was replaced by the factory last week. They didn't have time to pull it apart and diagnose the issues I was experiencing, which is kind of a bummer. I like having answers.

    But I also like having a fork that works as advertised, and the replacement feels great after one short ride. Suiting up to take the long, trail-version of my commute into work right now, at 6*f, which should be a good test of the cold weather oil and grease they're using.

    One thing I'm not at all clear on is how to use the top and bottom air chambers to tune the fork. Russ gave me a verbal answer to this but it wasn't very clear, and the fiddling I've done (on the old, bad fork) achieved nothing of note other than to take the fork from feeling like crap to feeling like rigid.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rumblefish2010 View Post
    When do you put Your Wheel between two tree legs and twist the handlebar at the same time??
    Pretty much any time you ride through technical terrain and want the bike to follow your steering inputs and not what the rocks are trying to deflect the wheel towards. As a long time user of several inverted single crown forks, this was usually the worst thing about them. Off-camber or through serious rock tech sections you puckered up big time, because the fork had a tendency to go where it wanted because of that torsional play/lack of rigidity.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    How's the rebound?

    Is it still too damp?

    Does it feel like it's slow to return?

    I tried using higher pressure in the lower and low pressure in the upper, this made it more supple but rebound is still slow; damper?

    When I play with the new uninstalled damper, twisting the rod that attaches to the damper adjuster in the lower leg, I don't notice much difference in how the damping effect changes...

    Normal rideable range now. Pogo stick on one end, then twist the knob to the other end and it's slow as molasses.

  48. #48
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    That's not a problem with the Wren, I ran it through a wet rocky line and it tracked like a fork should track, it went where I pointed it, and it didn't twist or veer off line.

    If I didn't know it was an inverted fork, I wouldn't know it was an inverted fork by the way it handles.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Pretty much any time you ride through technical terrain and want the bike to follow your steering inputs and not what the rocks are trying to deflect the wheel towards. As a long time user of several inverted single crown forks, this was usually the worst thing about them. Off-camber or through serious rock tech sections you puckered up big time, because the fork had a tendency to go where it wanted because of that torsional play/lack of rigidity.

  49. #49
    since 4/10/2009
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    I'm liking what I'm reading in these recent reports.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    Normal rideable range now. Pogo stick on one end, then twist the knob to the other end and it's slow as molasses.
    That was good to hear, I will also get a New oil damper, lets hope that will work out as well. ¨

    I think you kan approach the air filling starting With putting 50 PSI on the bottom Chamber first and the same in the top Chamber. Then you start to add air in the top Chamber, to get the sag correct. When you get the sag correct, you can add or remove air in the bottom Chamber to get the bottom out resistance you want to have. Note that you will have the exact same air pressure in the bottom Chamber you ended up With when you found the correct sag. Since the air pressure is balancing between the two Chambers. Since there is a plunge that is moving according to the pressure you will shrink the top Chamber likewise. You can think about the bottom Chamber like an adjustable bottomless token. It will give you really good adjustable bottom out resistance. The way is to forget the air pressure measurement, only adding or lowering one amount of pressure. I have also noted the feel of the fork is more progressive With more air in the bottom Chamber.

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