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  1. #401
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenPsz View Post
    OK???

    Mine moves when the QR got loose but I always stopped and tightened it. But if you continued to ride long enough the hole could become oblonged then would rub all the time. Like how a loose headset can ruin an aluminum frame.

    But it looks like you want more of a fight than a discussion so I guess I'm done.
    whos fighting here? so far all i did was stating the facts. if you go up a few posts, i did post a bunch of pictures and discribed my problem. the tire is at normal position when the fork is at normal not compressed state. when the fork is compressed the tire would start to lean to the left side and start making contact to the left leg. same extact problem as Shinkers has, but he is running a smaller tire, so his does not make contact
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  2. #402
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenPsz View Post
    so maybe what you have identified is not so much a problem as a limitation on tire size.
    i mean, they advertise the fork to clear up to 5" tire, i bought the fork to run snowshoe 2xl tire. mounted the tire on a spesh 90mm stock rim did not clear, tire rotates fine except when compressed. mounted same 2xl tire on a 80mm mulefut rim. still the same. i go , ok maybe 2xl tire is a 5.05" tire over the fork rating. so i mounted a chaoyang 4.9 and lou 4.8 both of those did not clear when compressed. which was kinda unfortunate i had gone thru everything to test fit it and sending the fork back and forth. now i bought a lefty to run 2xl tire.
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  3. #403
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    Quote Originally Posted by akacoke View Post
    whos fighting here? so far all i did was stating the facts. if you go up a few posts, i did post a bunch of pictures and discribed my problem. the tire is at normal position when the fork is at normal not compressed state. when the fork is compressed the tire would start to lean to the left side and start making contact to the left leg. same extact problem as Shinkers has, but he is running a smaller tire, so his does not make contact
    You and I started to get into a back and forth which we have resolved.

  4. #404
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    As someone who has experienced this first hand, I'd just like to add my perspective.

    From what I can tell, any inverted fork that doesn't have the lowers connected with a crown will have a lean to it. I could be wrong, but since the legs are independent from one another, the non-air side is going to have substantially less resistance and collapse easier. So it will lean in that direction before the air side begins to compress.

    According to Wren (hopefully Russ doesn't mind me posting this), they could tighten up tolerances within the fork (don't ask me where, I'm pretty ignorant on such things) and reduce the tire lean, but the fork would not compress as smoothly. They've opted for better 'feel' at the expense of a bit of tire lean.

    In my experience, if you're using a 'normal' tire (as in 4.0-4.8) the rub is a non-issue. I only ever rubbed my tire once, and that was under a hard impact with a curb that was poor riding on my part.

    Wren claims their fork will fit a 5 inch tire, at this point in the evolution of fat bikes, I still think 5 inch means 4.8. No one is claiming their fork will fit a 2XL.

  5. #405
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    2XL is 5.05 officially I thought?

    I'm 270, no rub issues, 90mm with 4.8 JJ Snakeskin.
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  6. #406
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    Quote Originally Posted by akacoke View Post
    I dont know what to say to this. my axle was perfectly tight. if you scroll up this page post 322 363, another user is having same problem. maybe some forks does this , some forks dont. people tend to believe whatever they wanna beleive.

    my fork was sent back to Wren and gone thru a complete rebuild/damper change. came back still the same. Wren's official reponse on facebook is they cant confirm my concerns. they are not aware of their forks lean to the left
    process of elimination: Have you checked the hub by completely rebuilding it? Maybe something is broken internally that you can't detect.

  7. #407
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    If possible it would be interesting to see a front on picture of the fork and wheel with the deflection. Since it mechanically should have minimal deflection if the thru bolt and holes are tight along with the bolt being snug. Since then the only possible movement would be the "slop" in the actual fork bushings. I wonder what the tolerances are for these forks too since the max tire could very greatly based on what side of the tolerances your individual fork happens to be fall into.

  8. #408
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shinkers View Post
    As someone who has experienced this first hand, I'd just like to add my perspective.

    From what I can tell, any inverted fork that doesn't have the lowers connected with a crown will have a lean to it. I could be wrong, but since the legs are independent from one another, the non-air side is going to have substantially less resistance and collapse easier. So it will lean in that direction before the air side begins to compress.

    According to Wren (hopefully Russ doesn't mind me posting this), they could tighten up tolerances within the fork (don't ask me where, I'm pretty ignorant on such things) and reduce the tire lean, but the fork would not compress as smoothly. They've opted for better 'feel' at the expense of a bit of tire lean.

    In my experience, if you're using a 'normal' tire (as in 4.0-4.8) the rub is a non-issue. I only ever rubbed my tire once, and that was under a hard impact with a curb that was poor riding on my part.

    Wren claims their fork will fit a 5 inch tire, at this point in the evolution of fat bikes, I still think 5 inch means 4.8. No one is claiming their fork will fit a 2XL.
    You are correct, due to the inverted construction, there is significantly more " slop" because the lowers are poorly coonected via a small diameter removeable axle with insufficient contact surface and poor tolerances at the dropouts.

    To their credit, Wren has done a good job bringing this fork to market, but they and us would have been better served with a non inverted fork with the same features.

    The Wren fork is as good as it's gonna get without a bolt through/hex lock styled axle. I told Wren this at the outset; torsion and independent leg movement has been an issue since day one. It's not a bad fork, but it's also not great.

  9. #409
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    Guys,

    Page 9 of this post is an eye opener for me. It's making a touch gun-shy of inverted forks altogether .

  10. #410
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    Quote Originally Posted by plasmaguy View Post
    Guys,

    Page 9 of this post is an eye opener for me. It's making a touch gun-shy of inverted forks altogether .
    Done correctly, inverted forks work great, just look at the DH fork market.

  11. #411
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    You are correct, due to the inverted construction, there is significantly more " slop" because the lowers are poorly coonected via a small diameter removeable axle with insufficient contact surface and poor tolerances at the dropouts.

    To their credit, Wren has done a good job bringing this fork to market, but they and us would have been better served with a non inverted fork with the same features.

    The Wren fork is as good as it's gonna get without a bolt through/hex lock styled axle. I told Wren this at the outset; torsion and independent leg movement has been an issue since day one. It's not a bad fork, but it's also not great.
    I sent the same message to Wren about the bolt through since I always get my QR to loosen up. and they are working on that very idea. So seems they do listen to us which is nice to hear.

  12. #412
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    The lowers just need connected with a crown. DVO does this and it seems like it'd take care of the issue.

    That said I'm extremely happy with mine. Even considering dishing to the other side a bit to deal with this but it's really not a big deal.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Wren 150mm Tuning/Setup Guide-114512_01_d.jpg  


  13. #413
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    Quote Originally Posted by plasmaguy View Post
    Guys,

    Page 9 of this post is an eye opener for me. It's making a touch gun-shy of inverted forks altogether .
    I'm 270, ride my Wren pretty damn hard, and don't experience anything approaching the problems Ben says he has. Don't give one person with a strong opinion too much weight.

    If you ride your fat bike hard, it's an excellent upgrade. It's not as good as the best +bike forks, but it's miles above the Bluto.
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  14. #414
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    Quote Originally Posted by schnee View Post
    I'm 270, ride my Wren pretty damn hard, and don't experience anything approaching the problems Ben says he has. Don't give one person with a strong opinion too much weight.

    If you ride your fat bike hard, it's an excellent upgrade. It's not as good as the best +bike forks, but it's miles above the Bluto.
    Except that I've had three Wren forks, 110 and 150 (2), rode the 110 on a tandem with a combined weight of 360; 270# on a bike is child's play.

    I also had the first blown damper the first auto twisting crown, intimate knowledge of the damping system having taken one apart, same with adjusting travel and fork length, all before most of you had even seen a a Wren.

    But yeah, I'm just one guy, what the hell do I know

    On a side note, that DVO looks really good, and the use of a stanchion guard bridge to connect the legs is brilliant.

    Look to Sea Otter...

  15. #415
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Except that I've had three Wren forks, 110 and 150 (2), rode the 110 on a tandem with a combined weight of 360; 270# on a bike is child's play.
    That's the point. For most riders, it's plenty stiff. For those of us who push the boundaries, it starts to show it's weaknesses, like any piece of hardware.

    Putting it through extraordinary circumstances then harping on that stuff when a typical rider asks is misleading.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    I also had the first blown damper, the first auto twisting crown, intimate knowledge of the damping system having taken one apart, same with adjusting travel and fork length, all before most of you had even seen a a Wren.

    But yeah, I'm just one guy, what the hell do I know


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  16. #416
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Done correctly, inverted forks work great, just look at the DH fork market.
    No way. If you need more than 8" of travel, you start to lack the overlap necessary and you simply have to go to an inverted design for this reason, but since DH forks have settled at 8" of travel, it's not necessary and inverted forks for MTB do not offer any advantages. It takes more engineering, R&D, $ and time to make them as stiff laterally as conventional forks. Apply that same time and effort for a single crown non-inverted and you'll end up with a stiffer and lighter fork. Single crown inverted forks are especially poor because they lack the 2nd crown that boosts the stiffness significantly in a dual crown inverted fork. About the only real advantage is better lubrication with a semi-bath system where the oil sits above the seals the entire time. Other than that, you get a lot of disadvantages and they never work as well. I've had 4 over the years, but it was always the "same old ****". They look cool, but don't really offer any benefit.

    In this case, they are relatively easy to manufacture, do not require castings for aluminum/magnesium lowers, so putting them together for fat-bikes isn't as challenging as say the Bluto design, but that's also why it weighs what it does.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  17. #417
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rumblefish2010 View Post
    You will not be having tire rubbing it you tighten the axle with the 5mm hex tool on the nut. I am weighing 260lbs and have been using JJ 4.8 on 90mm rims, without any issue.
    Hey, I experienced this first hand today for the first time. I think I've got some grit on the conical washers and will clean them, but I'm curious how tight you're tightening your axle?

    I'd like to start using the hex nit but don't want to overdo it. Are you still able to open the qr by hand? Thanks.

  18. #418
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    If you use the hex nut you will not be able to open the QR by hand. I snugged it up by hand (QR closed) then used a wrench to really tighten it down, but you will need a wrench with you to get the QR to open up.

  19. #419
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    But you know that's not true. You've ridden the Wren and you've read all the user posts.

    You want to defend a product like it's a person, but it's just a fork.

    I'm 195# and I noticed the lateral movement, the torsion effect, the clunking at full extension, plus all the other issues that plague this fork. I'm not alone, many if not everyone has experienced some or all of these issues.

    The ONLY value a Wren fork provides is greater stability and more travel when compared to it's only competitor, the Bluto. Simply put, if a Pluto (Fat bike Pike) existed, the Wren would disappear.

    So Wren cornered the market on long travel for a moment; the increased stability is arguable, but that moment will vaporate in April.

    It'll be tough to sell a Bluto or a Wren once Manitou releases it's fat bike fork.

    But I don't really mind because it's worth the $$ to get a good fork. If we're lucky, RS and Fox will follow suit.

    Quote Originally Posted by schnee View Post
    That's the point. For most riders, it's plenty stiff. For those of us who push the boundaries, it starts to show it's weaknesses, like any piece of hardware.

    Putting it through extraordinary circumstances then harping on that stuff when a typical rider asks is misleading

  20. #420
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    But you know that's not true. You've ridden the Wren and you've read all the user posts.

    You want to defend a product like it's a person, but it's just a fork.

    I'm 195# and I noticed the lateral movement, the torsion effect, the clunking at full extension, plus all the other issues that plague this fork. I'm not alone, many if not everyone has experienced some or all of these issues.

    The ONLY value a Wren fork provides is greater stability and more travel when compared to it's only competitor, the Bluto. Simply put, if a Pluto (Fat bike Pike) existed, the Wren would disappear.

    So Wren cornered the market on long travel for a moment; the increased stability is arguable, but that moment will vaporate in April.

    It'll be tough to sell a Bluto or a Wren once Manitou releases it's fat bike fork.

    But I don't really mind because it's worth the $$ to get a good fork. If we're lucky, RS and Fox will follow suit.
    Almost like we are back to the old days of front suspension where what is good now will not be quickly. Why RS did not go with a suitable fork to begin makes no sense since they have the 29er forks to make a great fat bike fork from the get go.

    Although I will disagree with your statement about the ONLY thing Wren does, they have the best customer service I have ever experienced. Something that the bigger bike parts companies seem to be lacking.

  21. #421
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    Hi,

    I've just received my Wren

    Yesterday it was the first time out with my new fork on my Mutz.
    Huge difference with the bluto, more responsive, better feeling, stiffer.....
    The only problem i have is that i give equal shock pump in each chamber for my proper sag, all was fine on the trail except at high speed on a small bump the wren used all the 150 mm and bottomed out....

    How can i do to make the end of the travel "harder" to reach (to prevent from bottoming out) : Should i put several shock pump in each of the chamber or should i put more air in one of them ? But which one ?

    The Wren is now with 60 psi and equal shock pump in each chamber.
    I'm around 98 kgs with clothes and all the equipment .

    Sorry for my English


    Steve, from France

  22. #422
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    Add another 5-10 strokes to one chamber or the other. Is the terrain that you ride extremely rough with big jumps and drops? Add to the lower chamber. Is it very rocky and rooty with lots of high frequency bumps? Add to the top.

  23. #423
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    Quote Originally Posted by gravitylover View Post
    Add another 5-10 strokes to one chamber or the other. Is the terrain that you ride extremely rough with big jumps and drops? Add to the lower chamber. Is it very rocky and rooty with lots of high frequency bumps? Add to the top.

    so i will add to the top

    Thanks a lot

  24. #424
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    I'd also add that I weigh about what you do when I'm riding with gear and have 85 psi in my fork. 60 seems a bit on the low side...

  25. #425
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    Yeah the whole number of pumps thing is odd but does work.

  26. #426
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    good luck selling your wrens after mastodon releases
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  27. #427
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    Quote Originally Posted by akacoke View Post
    good luck selling your wrens after mastodon releases
    Why would you want to sell something that works?

  28. #428
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenPsz View Post
    Why would you want to sell something that works?
    Some people will always have to buy the newest thing.
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  29. #429
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    If it works fine, i won't sell my Wren.

    75 psi and it feels nice now !

    Wren 150mm Tuning/Setup Guide-mutz-mont-vinaigre.jpg

  30. #430
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    of course yall say it works fine. if i paid $895 for something that dont work good. i wont tell either
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  31. #431
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    Quote Originally Posted by akacoke View Post
    of course yall say it works fine. if i paid $895 for something that dont work good. i wont tell either
    Like we discussed earlier I (and others) don't have the issues you seem to have, my fork works fine. But you do seem a bit bitter and I do hope that the new mastodon fork lives up to your expectations and you are finally happy.

  32. #432
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    there is a difference between "not having issues" and "not knowning when issues are happening"

    i would be bitter if i still have the fork. lol
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  33. #433
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    Quote Originally Posted by akacoke View Post
    there is a difference between "not having issues" and "not knowning when issues are happening"
    Oh I guess you are calling me and others uninformed then since we don't know as much as you do, fair enough. I know when a fork works and does not work to the point it does what I need it to do.

    i would be bitter if i still have the fork. lol
    Whatever you say there dude. If you were not bitter you would not continue to bash a fork you no longer have. An opinion is fine but you are going way down the hate trail.

    But like I said I hope you are eventually happy.

  34. #434
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    re: Mastodon. There will always be something newer, which people always perceive to be better. according to the specs page, the AC will not work for my bike, so it is a non starter for me. Once the hysteria dies down, I would love to ride one. perhaps it will be part of my next build.

    the wren is better than the bluto or lauf for where i ride, and for me personally. so, it is what i am running on my bike.


    back to the wren discussion:

    on my 110 set to 90,regarding air pressure, i set sag at 38 strokes top and bottom, then ended up adding an additional 20 strokes to the bottom.

    the fork rides a touch stiff, but i still bottom out on the fast rough stuff, sometimes dramatically. on tonight's ride, i plan on adding another 4 strokes to the bottom and seeing what happens.

    Any hints on how to soften the initial part of the stroke, yet stiffen the bottom out resistance? thanks.

  35. #435
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    Put more strokes in the top. That makes the fork feel more plush but you're still increasing psi so you should still increase bottom out resistance at the same time.

  36. #436
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    To those who've serviced their own forks, are you using the molykote grease wren recommends on the air piston? Or are you putting slick honey on everything?

    Also, how hard is it to get the bushing back in without a second bushing to push it in with (like shown in the video).

    Thinking about pulling mine apart and regreasing...

  37. #437
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    I went out and got Molykote grease as I was not sure if Slick Honey was a good replacement or not.

    I can't remember what I did with the bushing..........it has been awhile.
    But I did not have an issue.

    But it was a lot pricer then I thought it was going to be......
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  38. #438
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    Yeah molykote is like 35 bucks a tube (though if I can find it locally that's not that big of a deal).

  39. #439
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    Quote Originally Posted by schnee View Post
    2XL is 5.05 officially I thought?

    I'm 270, no rub issues, 90mm with 4.8 JJ Snakeskin.
    Me too, I am using 90 mm with JJ 4.8 and no rubbing. I am pretty sure you do not do alignment and tightening of the axle. That will cause rub with big tires. Just tighten the lever on the QR at let say 9 oclock and then twist lever up to 12 oclock. Then use allen wrench and tight as much you can withougt destroying it. It should be tight and fine. If not correctly aligned and tightened it will rub for sure.

  40. #440
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shinkers View Post
    To those who've serviced their own forks, are you using the molykote grease wren recommends on the air piston? Or are you putting slick honey on everything?

    Also, how hard is it to get the bushing back in without a second bushing to push it in with (like shown in the video).

    Thinking about pulling mine apart and regreasing...
    It does not matter much, using slick honey ore molykote. The grease will not stay much there after putting pressure in the fork. It is more important to service the shock a bit more often and also put silicon on the legs.

  41. #441
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    Well I just got done servicing the air side and if I wasn't convinced that the Wren is by far the best fork available before, I sure as hell am now. This fork is far and away easier to service than the bluto.

    I seemed to notice slightly more stiction after my last ride. That coupled with a few other concerns are what prompted me to open the fork up. When I did I found LOADS of grease in there that was fairly dirty.

    After cleaning the old grease off and re lubing slightly less excessively, the fork feels brand new again. Huge improvement.

    Only issue I ran into was when tightening the nut at the top of the leg, the piston would spin before I could get it torqued comfortably. However finger tightening and then adding air to the fork fixed that. I think the load on the piston helps keep it in place.

  42. #442
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLBikes View Post
    Also this is spot on, customer service has been above reproach, great couple of guys, hope they get the bugs worked out.
    They are very responsive, set the standard for customer service, it's really a shame their efforts went toward an inverted fork design. If they'd built a 35mm non inverted fork, Trek might be speccing a Wren. Hindsight is 20-20.

  43. #443
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    My local bike park opened this weekend and rode the Mutz with Wren for half the day. The work worked flawlessly, including full speed down the DH course with Gaps, Tables, step-ups, and drops. Final run of the day down the jump line I passed three 'normal' DH bikes, the Mutz/Wren didn't want to leave the park and pinned it.

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