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  1. #1
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    Won an Evo Brewster - Heavy Build

    I won a new Evo Brewster in a charity MTB ride this weekend. I'm still not sure what to do with my now 4th bike which is massive and ~45 lbs.

    Specs:
    http://evobicycle.com/wp-content/upl.../920261_en.pdf

    If I sell it or keep it, I'd like some advice on some easy cheap wins to shed some weight.

    My guess is wheels, tires and tubes are the culprit as the rest of the build doesn't seem too bad. The frame is beautifully welded 6061 aluminum with slightly higher than entry level components.

    Fork (sloppy welds), crank, bars, stem, wheels are all unlogoed alloy. Tires have WD logo, perhaps they are cheapy WD hardpacks found on big box Mongoose and Kawasakis?

    If my assumption that it's wheels, tires and tubes in correct, drilling the rims would be step 1 I suppose. What tires and tubes could I swap to? How much could we shed here, 6-8 lbs?

    Also can I find/put a QR front skewer on? It's bolt on and I'm not running a vehicle that has a hitchmount bike rack.

    This bike still retails for $580 -$700 and think I'd list it at $425ish.
    Last edited by Crusoe; 01-25-2016 at 08:36 PM.

  2. #2
    since 4/10/2009
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    That thing is a tank. It's not really even a mtb. It's a cruiser bike of some kind. Look at the gearing. The lowest option you have is 32x28. Sweet mother. Low gear on my fatbike is 28x42. I'd just sell it outright to someone who wants a cool fatbike for leisurely beach cruising, neighborhood cruising, chasing kids, bar bike, etc.

    I wouldn't even strip all the parts and use the frame as a base for a truly functional build. There are much better options if that's what you want.

    Yes, you could put it on a diet by drilling the rims and installing lighter tires. There's a good chance the rims are not welded and cannot be set up tubeless reliably, so that may not even be an option to improve weight loss. Since the wheels are 36h, any holes you drill in the rim will have to be smaller and will cut down on the amount of weight you can lose.

    You probably can convert the hubs to QR axles, and that would probably be another significant weight loss item. But again, I wouldn't bother.

  3. #3
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    This bike is built to be ridden to bars and then crashed on the way home.

    If you're down with having a phat beach cruiser, then keep our. If not you may as well sell it.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by tfinator View Post
    This bike is built to be ridden to bars and then crashed on the way home.

    If you're down with having a phat beach cruiser, then keep our. If not you may as well sell it.
    Ha! That is indeed what would happen. My pub is two big hills away with some gnarly sharp turns. I took it out today as it was dry to see how if felt. Fun to road ride till I tried to turn by leaning going too fast, nearly ran into the curb.

    Have some interested buyers already so it's gone to the first taker. I'm fine with my Klein Mantra, Custom Ti hybrid, and Focus Cayo Evo for road and trail. Thanks for info and chuckles.

  5. #5
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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    Actually they're not half bad as a trail fat once you change the glaring errors. I rebuilt one and traded it to a friend a couple months ago...


    Won an Evo Brewster - Heavy Build-evobrewster1.jpgWon an Evo Brewster - Heavy Build-evobrewster3.jpgWon an Evo Brewster - Heavy Build-evobrewster5.jpg


    I bought it brand new from a local shop for 40% off because they had only brought it in as a sample (they're also a Trek and Giant dealer, so they have farley's already and will likely have Giant's new urban-lineup with their cheap fat bikes) to compare to others, also they couldn't make the drivetrain work right (the chain kept hitting the stock tire casing). Retail was $800CDN - $320 + 15% tax = $550 and change. I put about $170 into it with a pair of new Kenda Juggernaught Sport 4.0s, square-taper 58/94 bolt pattern cranks with 22/32/42 rings, different cassette, a direct mount front derailleur and fat adapter, and a front shift and cable/housing. Also different pedals, different locking grips, lighter tubes (used the MEC DH thin wall tubes for $6 each) and a different handlebar. In the end I shed like four pounds and got many more gears to pick from. Mine was 37.7 pounds when done.

    Those stock evo tires are like 5.5 pounds each and the tubes about about 1.5 pounds each. and the cranks and bar suck, but otherwise the geometry is ok and it has some decent parts (avid BB-5s, SRAM X-4 and the rear wheel is a freehub body.
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

  6. #6
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    I beg to differ. The Brewster is a tad bit heavy, but nowhere near 45 pounds. For a $650 fat bike (what I paid) with Avid BB5's and a SRAM drivetrain, it's a steal. As the previous poster noted, the tubes are super-heavy. I was able to drop a noticeable amount of weight by setting the wheels up ala ghetto tubeless with one round of Gorilla tape and 2.5 red cup-fulls of Stan's.

    The welds are noticeable, but (again) for the price and the components, there's not much else out there. I've ridden the crud out of mine and I'm quite happy to say those bomber-welds have taken my 250-pound big-guy body without nary a squeak.

    If the Brewster is too expensive, sure, go for the Walmart fatty. If you want something super light, go for the $4,000 carbon set-up. Otherwise, in my humble opinion, I think the Brewster quite nicely splits the difference, with plenty of room for some inexpensive upgrades.

  7. #7
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    To eacj their own but i beg to differ. You can get a Motobecane Boris X5 (SRAM X5 9 speed drivetrain) for $50 less and has better gearing and is 35 lbs stock. The tires are garbage but on an inexpensive fatbike those are generally first to go.
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  8. #8
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    I hear you. And agree about those tires. Too funny. I almost went with the Motobecane Boris, particularly because of that drivetrain boost. I ended up with the Brewster after my LBS showed me a picture of the same Boris with a crimp in the top tube, right where it bends and angles into the seat tube. My LBS said they'd seen two of those, which is why I went with the Brewster, which I've beaten the snot out - with no issues. On an aside, my LBS doesn't sell either the Boris or the Brewster.

    It's fun having a (relatively) inexpensive fat bike, but a possible crimped frame with the Boris scared me off. I'm sure there's a reason Motobecane went with that geometry, but even from afar, that seems unstable. The Brewster's geometry and frame welds have been rock solid.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by velofest View Post
    I hear you. And agree about those tires. Too funny. I almost went with the Motobecane Boris, particularly because of that drivetrain boost. I ended up with the Brewster after my LBS showed me a picture of the same Boris with a crimp in the top tube, right where it bends and angles into the seat tube. My LBS said they'd seen two of those, which is why I went with the Brewster, which I've beaten the snot out - with no issues. On an aside, my LBS doesn't sell either the Boris or the Brewster.

    It's fun having a (relatively) inexpensive fat bike, but a possible crimped frame with the Boris scared me off. I'm sure there's a reason Motobecane went with that geometry, but even from afar, that seems unstable. The Brewster's geometry and frame welds have been rock solid.
    Absolutely buy what you are comfortable with. But I can tell you that there ano issues with the frame design. 9zero7 also used a very similar frame for their fatbike. There are way more Moto's out in the wild than your bike and cannot recall any failures. Also it is a well known fact that the Moto Boris is really just a rebadged KHS 4 season (although it has different rear dropouts, you can check out the KHS website). There is no concern with the frame design and KHS is a very large frame manufacturer.

    Are you saying that the frame actually failed and bent at the point where the angles into the seat tube? There is a natural bend there but are you saying that is bent more? I seriously doubt that, especially if they said they saw 2 of them. The frame is completely sound and stable, check out the VERY lengthy Boris thread in this forum and reviews of the KHS 4 season.

    Also note that Motobecanes are sold through Bikes Direct only so you won't see them in any LBS.
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  10. #10
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    Yep, that's what I saw, a crimp/crack right at that location. After the
    second one came in, the LBS took a picture of that Boris, which is
    the one I saw. As with you, the LBS also thought it was super-unusual to
    have seen it even one time - nevermind twice.

    I totally get my LBS is never going to be a fan of Bikesdirect, which is
    why I mentioned that they didn't sell either of those bikes. At least in
    this instance, they didn't have a dog in the fight. They didn't sell me a
    bike because of the defective Boris frame (or to be clear, in the two
    defective Boris frames, which I'll be the first to point out might have
    been the only two such defective Boris frames).

    I'm a huge Bikesdirect fan. They're awesome. I've purchased a few bikes
    from them. Didn't t mean to diss Bikesdirect or Moto. They put out some
    great bikes with great groupsets at great prices. But we've all been
    there ... sometimes a "rebranded" bike is, unfortunately, a bit less than a
    'rebrand.' And oftentimes that has absolutely nothing to do with the bike
    itself - but in order for the economics to work, some corners may need
    to be 'edged,' even if only just a bit (e.g., quality control, packaging,
    even an inexpensive or rough shipper/handler could do something untoward to an otherwise bomber
    frame). Perhaps 99% of the time, a rebrand makes the cut, but it's the
    thought of one of those cut-corners that makes me wonder sometimes.
    Anyway, another topic altogether!

    I think we're actually on the same side here. Perhaps we'll need to agree
    to agree (haha!).

    Happy trails.

  11. #11
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    I was just stating my opinion, based on what I know as were you. I am glad you like your Evo, agree the main point is that you/everyone is riding something. I have never heard of any issues on this forum about the Boris frame was my point, so apparently where you live is bad luck :-)

    Cheers
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  12. #12
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    Velofest can you get a copy of the pic of the broken Boris from the shop I would love to see it. Also a pic of your EVO. Thanks.
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  13. #13
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    Those chainstays are huuuuggggee!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by dietz31684 View Post
    Those chainstays are huuuuggggee!
    Despite that, I had one of mine shear yesterday. Despite riding my Brewster daily, I hadn't ridden it off-road in the last six months, and yet...snap!

    I guess I'll find out how good their warranty service is.

  15. #15
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    DeeEight - Hey - sweet build! I just bought a Brewster on eBay, love the frame lines...... and got inspired by your work Going to drill out the wheels and go tubeless to start.

    Recycling parts... found everything used on eBay or in the barn. Setting frontup 2x9 with Sram X7 top pull and Sram Gx-1000 crankset with nylon composite pedals. Rear with Shimano XT shifter and 11-36 cassette. Panaracer B Nimble's (half price of the Kenda's.... we'll see if they hold up).

    I'll post pics here when mocking up. Bike should arrive in a couple weeks.

    Couple questions if you don't mind:

    1. How long is your chain?
    2. How wide are the bars?
    3. Any problems with bottom bracket?

    FYI- Chainstay length on these are 442mm. The Surly Pugsly is 448mm...I've seen everything from 420mm to 460mm on various bikes.

    ***Anyone charge downhill on one of these? I hope the frame holds up!

  16. #16
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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    @Halfabrain

    Its no longer my bike (traded it last year to a friend for a lot of paintball gear), so I cannot measure the chain. The stock BB was one of those sealed cartridge square taper units so it spun fine. You can find examples from VP and Neco on ebay. The bars were 680s I think.
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  17. #17
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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    Additional...the current Evo fat bike is now called the Big Ridge, $879 CAD retail, has the generic chao yang 26 x 4.0 fat tires you see on many lower priced fats, drilled 100mm width rims, better frame geometry, an alloy leg fork, 1x8 drivetrain with chainguard (28T ring, 11-34 cassette), QR front hub and solid axle/bolted rear hub, 135/190 spacing, tektro mechanical disc brakes. There's 5.5 inches between the fork blades and about 5 inches between the frame stays so you could definitely fit fatter rubber.

    Big Ridge¬*7.0 - EVO


    EDIT : a friend bought a small size one of the 2016 Bid Ridge's today and we put it on the scale after. Stock with reflectors fitted, 36.5 pounds. Stock tires are a wire-bead version of the Chao Yang Big Daddy's, which weighed about 1.65kg each. She immediately bought a pair of Vee Rubber Snowshoe XL's off me after confirming they do in fact fit the frame / fork and don't lead to chain rub on the tire. Dropped off another pound of weight. This is now a full ten pounds lighter than her previous fat bike, a schwinn biggity dlx (that was already significantly lightened from stock itself) and she still has a pair of surly light tubes to put in.
    Last edited by DeeEight; 04-01-2017 at 09:46 PM.
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