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Thread: Wolfgars

  1. #1
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    Wolfgars

    Big boots.Wolfgars-uploadfromtaptalk1453083669890.jpg
    --Peace

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    They don't feel big when riding. They are pretty light. And oh so warm. Stiff sole too - pedals efficiently (with clips).

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    These boots almost cost as much as my first car! They better be so warm they toast bread

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    Saw some at the lbs, carbon fiber soles are cool, and I wonder how they will hold up!

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    They cost more than a few cars Ive bought in my life.

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    These cost $150 less than my fat bike (it was on a heckuva sale, but still...) To each their own, but the moment I think I need to plunk down that kind of cash for a boot to ride my fattie, it just kinda sucks the fun right out of the whole thing for me....

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    If you need this warm of a boot you should be happy they even make one, and honestly I doubt they are making more than a couple hundred pairs. It ain't cheap to make that few of something.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    If you need this warm of a boot you should be happy they even make one, and honestly I doubt they are making more than a couple hundred pairs. It ain't cheap to make that few of something.
    Scarcity doesn't have much to do with it I don't think. It's the same pricing scheme on all QBP products.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 43st View Post
    Scarcity doesn't have much to do with it I don't think. It's the same pricing scheme on all QBP products.
    I will give you a little lesson on why something like this costs so much $$, and why limited quantities on an original design are so expensive. This isn't an existing mold that they are changing a color on, this looks to be a 100% from scratch product.

    How much did the prototype development cost?
    How much did the production tooling cost?
    How much did the molds cost?
    How much did the material cost?

    You have to roll all of this up into the cost of the product, and then determine how many you "think" you "might" sell.

    If you haven't had yourself ears deep in developing a product like this, then you really should do yourself a favor and not comment on the subject.

    I am not defending their pricing, just trying to help others who might not understand the investment 45nrth puts into a project like this.

    I bet if you broke it down, the first pair of boot they sold cost them $50k, and each boot after that brings the price down until they sell enough to pay for the production costs, then they start to make $$.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    I will give you a little lesson on why something like this costs so much $$, and why limited quantities on an original design are so expensive. This isn't an existing mold that they are changing a color on, this looks to be a 100% from scratch product.

    How much did the prototype development cost?
    How much did the production tooling cost?
    How much did the molds cost?
    How much did the material cost?

    You have to roll all of this up into the cost of the product, and then determine how many you "think" you "might" sell.

    If you haven't had yourself ears deep in developing a product like this, then you really should do yourself a favor and not comment on the subject.

    I am not defending their pricing, just trying to help others who might not understand the investment 45nrth puts into a project like this.

    I bet if you broke it down, the first pair of boot they sold cost them $50k, and each boot after that brings the price down until they sell enough to pay for the production costs, then they start to make $$.
    Maybe, but there are so many shoes already out there that wouldn't need a huge amount of modification to work. In fact, you could just make your own :make any shoe a cycling shoe - urban cycling shoes | images | retrofitz

    Learning more and more about these shoes every day, seeing how they are constructed, etc, I'm thinking it would be a better idea just to get some mountaineering shoes or snowboarding boots and make your own.

    At $450, given what mountaineering boots cost, the cost-benefit doesn't really seem worth it to me and these look very similar to my snowboarding boots.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    Or, just put some flat pedals on, and you don't need to modify anything - just buy a good stiff pair of winter/mountain boots and you're good to go.

    The "need" to buy such expensive boots, just to be clipped in, seems highly debatable. But I'm not trying to stir the pot or anything....
    "The only way we can truly control the outcome of a ride is not going on it, which is a choice I'm unwilling to make." -K.B.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smithhammer View Post
    Or, just put some flat pedals on, and you don't need to modify anything - just buy a good stiff pair of winter/mountain boots and you're good to go.

    The "need" to buy such expensive boots, just to be clipped in, seems highly debatable. But I'm not trying to stir the pot or anything....
    Yep, because if it's that cold, you are likely in some pretty extreme conditions, where being able to easily push the bike, hop off, etc, is probably worth it. I love clipless for just about anything, but extreme cold well in the negatives and it's nice to just be able to walk if necessary...
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Yep, because if it's that cold, you are likely in some pretty extreme conditions, where being able to easily push the bike, hop off, etc, is probably worth it. I love clipless for just about anything, but extreme cold well in the negatives and it's nice to just be able to walk if necessary...

    Oh yeah I forgot that when a boot is clipless ready you cannot walk with it...wtf was I thinking?

    That is a pretty cool DIY clipless thingy, but do you know how fast the cold would make its way to your foot with that giant chunk of plastic in place of the sole?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    That is a pretty cool DIY clipless thingy, but do you know how fast the cold would make its way to your foot with that giant chunk of plastic in place of the sole?
    With an inner and an outer boot, as with many snowboarding and mountaineering boots, I'd have to say slowly to non-existent, since that's the same way the 45N boots are designed. Plastic doesnt transmit heat very well either
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

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    I have the following two opinions:
    1. The price they're charging is likely fair given the engineering and cost of goods sold.
    2. These are completely unnecessary unless you're racing a fat bike daily in Nome, Alaska. Which no one does.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smithhammer View Post
    Or, just put some flat pedals on, and you don't need to modify anything - just buy a good stiff pair of winter/mountain boots and you're good to go.

    The "need" to buy such expensive boots, just to be clipped in, seems highly debatable. But I'm not trying to stir the pot or anything....
    This is what I just went back to.

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    I recently got a pair of wolvhammers and they are pretty awesome

    I'll put these in the category of nice things to have, but probably don't need. Pretty sure if we all looked around at our toys we each have something like this. Not sure anyone needs xx1 or Xtr di2, or 100mm hed carbon wheels, but I doubt many of us would say not thanks to owning them

    To the OP- enjoy your boots and I hope they guarantee you many more rides this winter

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by hiro11 View Post
    I have the following two opinions:
    1. The price they're charging is likely fair given the engineering and cost of goods sold.
    2. These are completely unnecessary unless you're racing a fat bike daily in Nome, Alaska. Which no one does.
    Some people do ride to Nome.
    --Peace

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by lars_d View Post
    some people do ride to nome.
    ha!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lars_D View Post
    Some people do ride to Nome.
    Just noticed your location. Things make a bit more sense now.

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    I ride my fatback everyday in Nome. But i'm happy with my lakes mxz for now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hiro11 View Post
    I have the following two opinions:
    1. The price they're charging is likely fair given the engineering and cost of goods sold.
    2. These are completely unnecessary unless you're racing a fat bike daily in Nome, Alaska. Which no one does.
    You'd be surprised how warm Nome usually is (well, for Alaska at least). Right now for instance, it's 16 degrees F. Being on the coast, it is more regulated by the ocean, but it does have cold spells. I was there a month back or so. Fairbanks and the interior on the other hand, different story completely.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    With an inner and an outer boot, as with many snowboarding and mountaineering boots, I'd have to say slowly to non-existent, since that's the same way the 45N boots are designed. Plastic doesnt transmit heat very well either
    Something like this is what I have in mind for the "conversion". These are not crazy heavy mountaineering boots, but they are extreme cold weather boots.

    (mtbr picture posting logic auto-rotates to what it thinks should be "up", with no way to fix, oh well)

    Wolfgars-image.jpgWolfgars-image.jpgWolfgars-image.jpg
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    You'd be surprised how warm Nome usually is (well, for Alaska at least). Right now for instance, it's 16 degrees F. Being on the coast, it is more regulated by the ocean, but it does have cold spells. I was there a month back or so. Fairbanks and the interior on the other hand, different story completely.
    This is why I friggen love this forum: it's the only place on the internet where you'll actually find the actual target audience for the Wolfgar. All thirteen of you.

    Side note: it hasn't gone above 0 in Chicago today. Yesterday, temperatures soared into the high single digits. It was a heat wave!

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    We had -15f and -30f with windchill in Central WI for the last few days. You don't need to live in extreme locations to be able to use something like these.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hiro11 View Post
    This is why I friggen love this forum: it's the only place on the internet where you'll actually find the actual target audience for the Wolfgar. All thirteen of you.
    If you had wolfgars it might take all 13 of them to help pull your warm foot from your mouth.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Something like this is what I have in mind for the "conversion". These are not crazy heavy mountaineering boots, but they are extreme cold weather boots.

    (mtbr picture posting logic auto-rotates to what it thinks should be "up", with no way to fix, oh well)

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    Looking forward to your DIY thread on doing the conversion...

  28. #28
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    Back to the Wolfgars...My initial impression is that the uppers are a little stiff and they run bigger than the Wölvhammers. I also do not like the blue laces (I will be replacing with red ones). I am going to wear them around the house for a week or so to soften them up a bit before I try them out on the bike. I'll be using them with Egg Beater 3 pedals and will use spikes with them. I will post my impressions once I have ridden with them.

    Additional comments: In size 50 they weigh 1197 grams per boot compared to about 800 grams each for the Wölvhammers. I normally wear a neoprene cover over my Wölvhammers, so the actual difference for me is about 220 grams per boots. On the plus side, they are much easier to get in and out of and the removable liners will be great for camping. I can wear the liner in my sleeping bag and keep my feet warm without having the studs on the boots tear everything up. They should also be easier to dry at checkpoints since they can be turned inside out.
    Last edited by Lars_D; 01-19-2016 at 11:00 AM.
    --Peace

  29. #29
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    Wolfgars

    Really? I LOVE the blue!

    I found they run similar to my Wolvhammers in size. Got 44 in each. Normally a size 9 (42.5??). I wear a liner sock (REI merino liner) and a thick rag wool sock over that. Feet stayed toasty over a 2 hr ride at 0F, and on a -5F night ride (about 1 hr). Running them with SPD DX M647 pedals.

    Carbon sole is super stiff which I like. Provides excellent pedaling efficiently. Didn't find the boot itself overly stiff, but purposely didn't cinch the laces super tight to impeded circulation.

    Overall VERY happy with them. IMHO, 45nrth nailed these.

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  30. #30
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    These boots are a God send for me. My feet are always freezing, at -10 Celsius my wolvhamers need hot pockets to keep my feet warm. If you have the foot issues I have and no desire to ever ride a bike not clipped in then the price is irreverent. They are worth every penny if they get me out on my bike I in my most hated season.

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    As my friend who will be racing Iditabike said "It is only $45 per toe".
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    I get really really cold feet and I think these would be awesome!!

  33. #33
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    The price is prohibitive. You think it's bad in US dollars, try $CDN.

    I might save money going the DIY route with a pair of modified winter boots, but how many trips will I have to make to stores to find a boot that fits me with just the right combination of warmth, stiff sole, deep tread, low cost, and mod-ability? How much trial and error will I have to go through to waterproof, insulate, and stiffen up the sole? How many hours spent lurking forums for DIY tips? And if the mod fails (mid-way through an epic ride, with my luck), I'm out that money, and more importantly, my time, which I value more.

    I don't relish the thought of plunking down that much cash for a pair of clipless boots, but the Wolvhammers I have now aren't warm enough for me, and I'm reluctant to go the DIY route because it'll probably require multiple trips to stores and in the end, I'll probably screw it up royally anyway.

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    Quality footwear is not a bad place to spend some dollars. I spend 2-300 on hunting boots because I want quality fit, function, and durability. Long gone are the days of cheap boots and replacing them every 6 months.
    Just enjoy the ride...

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    If you had wolfgars it might take all 13 of them to help pull your warm foot from your mouth.
    Well said.

    Quote Originally Posted by tedsti View Post
    As my friend who will be racing Iditabike said "It is only $45 per toe".
    Possibly the best way to figure out the cost.

    For me-
    The extra weight is noticeable over the hammers.
    I don't like that the rubber sole gets very narrow between the ball and the heel. (It causes them to slip off the pedal if you don't get proper placement. )
    I don't think they have to be so high and would be more comfortable if they were lower.
    The sole is very stiff and aren't as comfortable for longer rides.
    They are considerably warmer than the previous hammers.

  36. #36
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    Where are they made? For that price, I would hope Italy or Eastern Europe.
    Ridley CX, Stumpjumper Carbon HT, Surly Wednesday

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    Quote Originally Posted by rob5589 View Post
    Quality footwear is not a bad place to spend some dollars. I spend 2-300 on hunting boots because I want quality fit, function, and durability. Long gone are the days of cheap boots and replacing them every 6 months.
    This is true, but I looked around in a shop for a while to find the boots I posted previously, they have a stiff relatively thick sole, a dedicated inner boot and outer, which would make drilling through and sealing the outer pretty easy and they are way way less than $450. I have no doubt these cost as much if they are starting from scratch, but there are a lot of good boots out there on the market and it's also a leap of faith to assume this $450 boot is going to fit your foot perfectly, it's not like your hunting boots where there are many companies competing for your $$$ with slightly different lasts and dimensions. I can do the conversion with good quality mountaineering/dedicated snow boots that are rated to -30C and lower for half the cost. Although I've spent the $450 with my S4 hotronics and Lakes, if I was going to do it again I might pause and think about a conversion. As it stands, the hotronics allow me to ride well into the negatives. I too like being clipped in for everything and the colder it gets, the less there are issues with jammed cleats/pedals. Snow simply doesn't jam up stuff in those temps, it's really the much much warmer temps.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by hiro11 View Post
    This is why I friggen love this forum: it's the only place on the internet where you'll actually find the actual target audience for the Wolfgar. All thirteen of you. !
    I count nearly 50 people who would potentially benefit from this product.
    Iditarod Trail Invitational

    I say potentially cause I haven't worn mine out of the house yet as I'm nursing a bum heel from JayPs race a couple of weeks ago.
    Fatter than most.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soloracer View Post
    I count nearly 50 people who would potentially benefit from this product.
    Iditarod Trail Invitational

    I say potentially cause I haven't worn mine out of the house yet as I'm nursing a bum heel from JayPs race a couple of weeks ago.
    I am only planning on wearing them for the ITI if temperatures are forecast to be sub zero. If not I'll wear my Wolvenhammers. The Wolfgars are just too heavy to wear unless you absolutely have to. But I am only going to McGrath. If I were headed to Nome. I'd wear the Wolfgars regardless of the forecast - it's just too unpredictable.
    --Peace

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    I will have to see how they work out for me and decide. It doesn't take much more than a couple of degrees below zero for me to get cold feet in the wolves. Since I moved to the desert and lost a few pounds I'm always cold so I will probably wear the gnars. I too am "only" going to McGrath.
    Fatter than most.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lars_D View Post
    Some people do ride to Nome.
    Are you riding to Nome this year?

    Those boots are nice, several folks i ride are using them, and they seem happy. However, they are frighteningly stiff - I am not sure how much fun they will be to walk in for any length of time, and all that stiffness isn't probably the best for circulation (and warmth).

    I am very tempted to get a pair, and would love to hear how you like them once you get some miles on them!

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    Quote Originally Posted by spruceboy View Post
    Are you riding to Nome this year?

    Those boots are nice, several folks i ride are using them, and they seem happy. However, they are frighteningly stiff - I am not sure how much fun they will be to walk in for any length of time, and all that stiffness isn't probably the best for circulation (and warmth).

    I am very tempted to get a pair, and would love to hear how you like them once you get some miles on them!
    Nope, I am only going to McGrath this year (assuming all goes well). Last year the Wölvhammers were fine for that trip and in fact had been fine for me down to -20 in an earlier race. That said, a lot can go wrong on the way to McGrath and to provide a bigger margin of safety I'll probably wear the Wolfgars if weather forecasts call for any sub-zero temperatures.
    --Peace

  43. #43
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    I picked up a pair of Wolfgars last week and did a 2.25 on Saturday, a 3 hour ride on Sunday, and a 1 hour ride to work this morning. -5 to -10 Celsius. This is my take on them:

    • Warm! I couldn't have done those 2+ hour rides in my old Wolvhammers without stopping to walk to warm up my toes.
    • Stiff! Both the sole and the uppers. I hope the uppers will soften up in time.
    • I like the dual lace cinch & Velcro buckle. Easy to adjust on the go with gloves or mitts. Smart.
    • Way easier to get in and out of than the old Wolvhammers with the zippered cover.
    • The wool liner is thinner than I anticipated.
    • Removable liner a great idea. My liners were pretty damp by ride's end on Sunday.
    • Wish the liner had a bigger pull tab in the back. Minor detail.
    • I'm not a fan of the baby blue laces. I don't know why 45NRTH didn't stick with orange. I could probably swap the laces out for another colour, but it doesn't bother me enough for me to bother.


    The boots are a good two sizes larger than my summer cycling shoes. Plenty of room to spare. I'm going to drop into an army surplus store and see if I can find a pair of mukluk liners that will fit, to upgrade the boots for even colder, longer rides.

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    I picked up a pair of wolfgars after much hemming and hawing.

    Good: I swapped out the stock liner with a 9mm sorel liner and they appear to be very warm, with lots of wiggle room after the liner swap for my size 12 (so size 46ish EU) foot in a size 50 boot .

    Bad: The upper on them is way too stiff and too tall. Walking in them isn't fun, and I can feel the stiffness when pedalling. Hopefully the upper softens up. To bad they don't have a shorter upper like lake's winter boots.

    I have a bunch of riding planning for the next four days, and will report back on I like them.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by ray.vermette View Post
    ...[*]Removable liner a great idea. My liners were pretty damp by ride's end on Sunday....
    Especially with these boots, you might should try a good vapor barrier system so that the liners would never get wet.

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    So, I now have some miles on mine, and I am mostly pretty happy. I went several sizes up, and swapped out the liner that comes with them with a 9mm sorel liner, which makes for a super warm boot. Initially I thought the upper was too stiff, but it appears to have loosed up.

    So, super impressed, except for one problem - the stitching seems to be coming appear on the heel. Is anyone else had this problem?

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by spruceboy View Post
    So, super impressed, except for one problem - the stitching seems to be coming appear on the heel. Is anyone else had this problem?
    Any pics?

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    It looks like this.
    Wolfgars-dsc04088.jpg

    Wolfgars-dsc04087.jpg

    I don't have a lot of miles on the boots, only about 15ish hours of riding in 0f to -15f ish weather. Mostly quite impressed at this point - they pedal nice, very warm with 9mm liners, water proof, and no zippers.. lots to like, besides the fact the stitching is ripping out. Which is a bit of a problem.
    Wolfgars-dsc03995.jpgWolfgars-dsc03918.jpg

    I am going to talk to my LBS tomorrow, and see what they have to say.

  49. #49
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    that's not stiching coming undone... it's glue unbonding... shitty nonetheless. Hopefully they resolve your issue ASAP!

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  50. #50
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    That split would explain the uppers becoming more pliable. Looks like these are warm but can't take a lot of pushing? Guessing next version will have much more flex built into it.

  51. #51
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    I have these and the flex is fine. There are 2 lace zones. Upper and lower. I suspect those complaining about tight uppers are reefing the shit out of them.

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    fine is relative - they are much stiffer in the upper than the lake winter boots, and i definitely notice the stiffness when spinning or climbing. It isn't a huge deal, but it doesn't seem like the best design.

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    Actually, only one boot is coming apart, the other seems to be fine. Both of the uppers softened up a bit with use.

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    Update - I am just going to glue them back together, it shouldn't be a big deal. My LBS is trying to get the ok from QBP/45N before I do that, just so I don't screw up any future warranty, but they haven't had any luck getting ahold of anyone. I will give them another week, then say screw it and glue them back up.

    Funny - I has something similar happen to some winter lakes (the stitching ripped on on the heel) years ago, I send the company an email from their website, and a day later the rep for my area called me, had the # of my LBS's manager and the # of a local firm that could switch them back up, and he told me to take them in, get them fixed, and send them receipt and lake would reimburse me. Since I live in a town in Alaska of ~60k (which i assume a very, very small market from lakes perspective) , I was pretty impressed he had these details at hand and how nice they were about it. This was before lake changed owners, perhaps things are different now.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chad_M View Post
    Where are they made? For that price, I would hope Italy or Eastern Europe.
    China.

  56. #56
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    Any updates on these boots after ridding them the winter? I found a pair on sale and want to buy them.

    More Opinions?

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    Update #2 - 45N warrantied them, I now have a set of new boots.

  58. #58
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    A quick FYI on my experience with Wolfgars.

    I ordered a set of 44s last week, $305 from Tree Fort Bikes.

    Pretty impressive boot, and not as heavy as the size would indicate. While it's big, it still fit under my sized large Specialized 3L Tech bib zipped-up leg cuffs. The boot's liner was thinner than expected. LOTS of vertical room for thick socks etc...

    Unfortunately I had to return them as the carbon sole has a fairly aggressive arch molded in. My feet are flat, and want their shoes/boots to stay that way as well. Heads up to those who like the same.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fritZman View Post
    A quick FYI on my experience with Wolfgars.

    I ordered a set of 44s last week, $305 from Tree Fort Bikes.

    Pretty impressive boot, and not as heavy as the size would indicate. While it's big, it still fit under my sized large Specialized 3L Tech bib zipped-up leg cuffs. The boot's liner was thinner than expected. LOTS of vertical room for thick socks etc...

    Unfortunately I had to return them as the carbon sole has a fairly aggressive arch molded in. My feet are flat, and want their shoes/boots to stay that way as well. Heads up to those who like the same.
    Have worn a pair since January. Same issue with the arch here. I have been experimenting with different insoles which has helped some. Causes some discomfort but my feet are warm so it is something I am living with at this point.

    Another issue I had with the boots is I wear crank brothers cleats and the cleats will not mount centered on the boots. When you tighten them down the cleat is crooked and has a tendency to move. Never experienced this on any other pair of shoes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Maybe, but there are so many shoes already out there that wouldn't need a huge amount of modification to work. In fact, you could just make your own :make any shoe a cycling shoe - urban cycling shoes | images | retrofitz

    Learning more and more about these shoes every day, seeing how they are constructed, etc, I'm thinking it would be a better idea just to get some mountaineering shoes or snowboarding boots and make your own.

    At $450, given what mountaineering boots cost, the cost-benefit doesn't really seem worth it to me and these look very similar to my snowboarding boots.
    To prevent frostbite, I'll gladly pay the $450. Just sayin'.


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    For those of you who have the Wolfgars, how many sizes up did you go for? I have also read that sone owners replaced the inner boot by something else. Could you give more info please?

    Thank you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fthefox View Post
    For those of you who have the Wolfgars, how many sizes up did you go for? I have also read that sone owners replaced the inner boot by something else. Could you give more info please?

    Thank you.
    I have size 12 (46/47 ) size feet, and went with the size 50 boot. I swapped out the liner with thicker sorel liner, making for a much, much warmer setup. Obviously you will not need to size up as much if you are just going with a standard liner. I used this setup a bit at <-20f weather, and I was very happy with it - nice and warm.

    It is also possible to use non-felt liners like intuitions (Intuition Liners) which probibly the warmest setup you could have. I tried this route, and the upper was much too stiff with the intuition liners for me. YMMV.

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    I am planning to get a pair of them this year and adding some glued overbooties around them. https://www.40below.com/products_det...p?ProductID=69 With the over booties and some Grabber hand warmers I think I'll be good to go but for me the question is money. My current Keen winter boots with Grabber hand warmers thrown in do OK but I'm not clipped in, which would be great at times. Tough one to call.

  64. #64
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    I bought a pair last year and think they are gonna be overkill for how I ride.
    I've got a set of brand new Wolfgars in size 44 for sale for cheap with reciept. Pm me if interested.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by kntr View Post
    I bought a pair last year and think they are gonna be overkill for how I ride.
    I've got a set of brand new Wolfgars in size 44 for sale for cheap with reciept. Pm me if interested.
    Well for cheap, I'd do it...if they were 3 sizes bigger
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    Walked into LBS today, see Wolfgar. Price $825 Canadian dollars. Head explodes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gecho View Post
    Walked into LBS today, see Wolfgar. Price $825 Canadian dollars. Head explodes.
    That is ~ $620 US at the current exchange rate - quite a markup!

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Maybe, but there are so many shoes already out there that wouldn't need a huge amount of modification to work. In fact, you could just make your own :make any shoe a cycling shoe - urban cycling shoes | images | retrofitz

    Learning more and more about these shoes every day, seeing how they are constructed, etc, I'm thinking it would be a better idea just to get some mountaineering shoes or snowboarding boots and make your own.

    At $450, given what mountaineering boots cost, the cost-benefit doesn't really seem worth it to me and these look very similar to my snowboarding boots.
    In looking closer, that retrofit system wouldn't work worth beans, as it involves cutting out the sole to put the plate in, which brings you back to square 1. Is it too much to ask for a thick sole WITH SPDs? Evidently.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  69. #69
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    After almost a full fatbike season of riding with the Wolfgars, I am selling them.

    They were certainly warm and efficient to pedal in, but the uppers were too stiff for my liking, no matter how I laced them up. They are also overkill for 3/4 of the fatbike season.

    I bought a pair of the new Wolfhammers, 2 sizes larger than I normally wear. For the 1/4 of the year when the temperature really plunges, I will don extra socks and some insulated gaiters. Hopefully that will do the trick.

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    I'll stick with my Sorels.

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    I picked up a pair of these in size 43, unfortunately they are a bit too big for me and I'm worried they will pack out even more with use. Does anyone have any experience with these packing out. The Wofgars are an extremely well made boot but with the design of the inner liner I would think going smaller would be better than going bigger, just like with snowboard boots.

    if anyone is interested I will consider a trade for the new version of the Wolvehammers in size 42 or Wolfgar in size 39 or 42.

    Shoot me a message if interested .

  72. #72
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    I've got a pair of brand new 44s for sale for $299. Pm me if interested.

  73. #73
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    They sat on my shelf for about two full winters. Every time I tried the on in the house they just felt too stiff and I put on my Wolfhammers instead. Well, my son took the wolfhammers with him to college which left me with only the 'gars. So this past weekend, I finally took them for a ride. They were incredibly warm and actually loosened up noticeably after only a 15 mile ride. We'll see how they do from here on out.
    --Peace

  74. #74
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    Try the new Lake MXZ 400's . I have a pair and they are no joke. I would rate them just a tad under the wolfgar for warmth but much much better than the wolfhammers. Comfort and fit wise they are in a class by themselves. I think Lake nailed the perfect winter boots 👢.👍👍👍👍
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    In the past I've always gone all in when it comes to spending on my hobbies but don't have that luxury any more. But if you can spend that on riding boots go for it. The look cool.