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  1. #1
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    Wintertime riding - what shoes or boots and socks do you wear?

    I am a fatbike newbie within the last 6 weeks. Thoroughly hooked! I live in Michigan. The last several years the winters here have be relatively mild, and last year we really didn't have a winter. As a result I was able to stay riding, on my MTB and/or Cross. The temps allowed me to use heavy UA socks and my Five Ten shoes.

    This year is a different story. Colder temps limit this footwear combination to about an hour of ride time. Now that I have a Moonlander, I can ride in conditions and to places that this footwear combination probably isn't appropriate/suitable for, especially if I breake down and need to walk out.

    I use some Shimano MX80 pinned flat pedals on my moonie.

    For those of you that ride regularly in the winter, at temps below 20 degress, what footwear and socks do you use? Is there footwear that still allows some sense of ones foot on the pedal?

    My Cat boots are plenty warm, but do not transmit any sense of the pedal. I'm a size 13 EEE, and I have to be careful because the heel of my boot hits the derailleur with each pedal revolution.

    Care to share what you are doing?

  2. #2
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    Probably should do a search, but check out the 45NRTH Wolvhammers or the Lake winter boots. I have the 45NRTH's and ride a lot in temps well below zero.

  3. #3
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    I've tried 2 different variations with success in both: Mavic summer MTB shoes with Hotronics skiboot heaters, plus neoprene booties, and more recently, Louis Garneau 0* LS-100 shoes. Both work great, the LG shoes are very warm (haven't plugged the heaters in yet, even on a ride where my beer froze. Must need a higher-octane beer). I think the downside to the Mavics is that they need the neoprene booties to seal them against snow, while the downside to the LGs is that their sole material is very hard and is slick in the parking lot and on ice. I'm a 10EEE and sized up the LGs on full size, that seems to work well with wool ski socks. Both work well with a clip-in platform pedal and don't seem to fill with snow. I know some people don't like the cold transmission through the cleat, but the Hotronics mounts in the same spot (under the footbed) and fixes that issue.

    WRT your other post about gloves, I use whatever's sitting on the workbench, from elkskin/thinsulate ranch gloves, to old SixSix1 winter gloves, to large gauntlets. I also bring silkweight liners. With pogies and insulation on the brake levers, I can ride down to about 10-15* with a midweight glove. Yesterday's ride at 35* had no gloves and hands on top of the pogies, so in my experience, they are the most critical element.

  4. #4
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    You should have just started one thread with all your questions

    I have some thinner cheap Sorel boots that have been great for 5+. I wear socks in them.
    I have some thick cheap Sorel boots that have been great for colder temps. I wear socks in them.
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  5. #5
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  6. #6
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    I just use my normal clipless shoes with those neoprene roadie boots over them, warm and dry, was -10c yesterdays and my feet were toasty warm. yes I still use clipless even on the fatty in the winter. I had no issues climbing any hills by foot. They clog from time to time but a few whacks on a tree clears them out. Been riding clipless for so long it just doesn't feel right riding with flats. Even in the deep snow I had no snow get inside these things, they are a pain to get on but I love them for keeping my feet dry and warm. I know I am probably the minority in using this combo for winter ridding on a fatty.
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  7. #7
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    New Balance 1000 winter running/hiking shoes, Wigwam real wool socks, flat pedals with lots of spiky things on them have worked well for me in the Mitten this winter.

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    Yeah, -10C isn't terribly cold and about the limit where I can use my lake SPD boots. When it gets significantly below that, around -20C, I have to use flats because the SPD pedals suck the heat right out of your feet. They are too close to your foot, and then it's just one giant metal heat-sink constantly exposed to the cold air, from the pedal to the bike.
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    Not on a fattie yet but been riding my old 26er all winter. Also in Michigan. I'm rolling with Sidi Genius Mega and an old pair of Performance neoprene over boot. Toe warmer packs are the key! Thay get warmer than the hand warmers. I'll probably upgrade to a real boot when the fat bike comes in but you certainly can get by without.

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  10. #10
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    I am also form Michigan, i have a FATBACK got a pair of LAKE 303's this year they are a nice upgrade from the summer shoes with booties over them. I have not tried the 45NRTH Wolvhammers just based on the price i got them for. just standard wool socks and i have been good. with the wind the last few days i placed toe warmers just in case, my feet never felt cold.

    T.

  11. #11
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    Shimano MW81's and usually just normal mtb socks or wool socks. But I need an insole like the Jaztronaut cuz when it his like 15 or below I start losing heat thru the bottom cuz of the pedal.
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  12. #12
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    Bumping this old thread...

    I just purchased these on sale at the mall. Super super light, and very toasty. Replaced my old heavy LL Bean boots. Very inexpensive.

    Rode yesterday in 5 degrees F. Paired with wigwam wool socks. Perfect.

    Men?s Snowblade Waterproof Warm Boot
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  13. #13
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    Wool or neoprene are pretty essential for cold weather riding. Wind and water protection added to any combo of insulation and you'll be warm. Sock liners are great for moving sweat away from your feet skin.

  14. #14
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    After alot of trail & error & frozen toes Ive settled on flat pedals with these boots, smart wool socks and toe warmers. So far so good. 2 three hour rides and a 5 mile hike in snow and my feet never got cold. The boots are light & not bulky. I bought a half size up from my normal size to allow for wool socks. When I bought mine there was a 25% off coupon that dropped the price to $120.

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  15. #15
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    I have been using North Face Winter Hiking Boots and they work well. They are warm, water proof, comfortable and light. The tread is good in snow and on ice. I know sooner or later I will have to hike a bike so booties over my normal cycling shoes won't work for me. I tried using my cycling shoes in the snow and cold came through the clips.

  16. #16
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    I've biked in Northern Maine for several years, 3 of those years I commuted every weekday to work by bike. Coldest I saw was -36f air temp and way below that With the wind chill!

    My feet always stayed warm on the really cold days by wearing two pairs of socks with a plastic baggie between the two layers. I used a very lightweight summer cycling woool sock for the base layer and a midweight Cross-country wool ski sock for the outer layer. For shoes I've had very good luck with mid height keen insulated hiking boots. Very warm water proof, and let's you retain some pedal feel;-) They are extremely comfortable as well, and not as crazy expensive as cycling specific boots.
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  17. #17
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    I get cold feet ( old frostbite), lake 303's are a remarkably warm system. I have one size up and there's room for thick wool sock and thin biking sock to wick sweat yet the fit is not sloppy.
    By system I mean they have really well, high insulated uppers, foot beds with metallic to reflect heat, softer rubber clears so traction on ice and cement is good.
    10f no problem for 2 hours is no issue now. I couldn't be more pleased.
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  18. #18
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    I got a pair of Northwave Celcius boots. It's one of the best bicycle "accessories" I ever bought

  19. #19
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    Salomon Toundra Mid WP. With wool socks, -10F is no problem. With summer cycling socks, -10F is no problem. Works great with my Fyxation Mesa pinned pedals. Sad thing is, you could find these boots all day for <$100 in the fall. Now they're nearly double that price.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunyak View Post
    I got a pair of Northwave Celcius boots. It's one of the best bicycle "accessories" I ever bought
    My feet froze in them. Wool socks, toe warmers, nothing helped. I had the Arctic model
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffw-13 View Post
    My feet froze in them. Wool socks, toe warmers, nothing helped. I had the Arctic model
    i have arctic model as well, these are def not for heavy winter riding. 3 hours is my max with -10C outside, and my feet would be cold towards the end of the ride in wool socks. these shoes are also not suitable for walking in deep snow as the velcro closures tend to open up on their own while walking in deep snow.

  22. #22
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    Wintertime riding - what shoes or boots and socks do you wear?

    I'm in south east Michigan. I wear lake 303. Awesome boot. Very warm and very comfy. I have a wide foot so my options were limited. Still went one size up. With defeet blaze socks it wears snug but very comfy. If I went two sizes up I could wear thicker socks. But with the defeets I have no complaints

  23. #23
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    I'm very happy with my Lake 303 and a pair of thick hiking wool socks down to about 15* for a roughly 1-1.5 hour ride.

    I've worn the Lakes up to 45* and normal socks and was also, very happy with them.

    Prior to that, I was wearing two pair of wool socks, my Bontrager summer shoes, and a pair of booties. 35* or below, and I had insanely painful feet.

  24. #24
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    For us clipless riders I've read some glowing reviews on these Vasque Arrowhead boots. A pretty good alternative to the $300 variety. I haven't ordered them yet but I will.
    Amazon.com: Vasque Men's Arrowhead Ultra Dry Snow Boot,Magnet/Chili Pepper,12 M US: Shoes

    Review from fatbike.com
    First Look ? Vasque Arrowhead Ultradry Winter Boot | FAT-BIKE.COM

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by XJaredX View Post
    Shimano MW81's and usually just normal mtb socks or wool socks. But I need an insole like the Jaztronaut cuz when it his like 15 or below I start losing heat thru the bottom cuz of the pedal.
    I actually use this combination and it is pretty good. However for longer, faster ride (on my CX bike for instance) I will lose heat out the top after 2+ hours. Planning to supplement with neoprene booties for that.

  26. #26
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    I'm using the 45NRTH Wolvhammers, and they are very warm.

    I also looked at the Northwaves, Lake 303s, and Specialized Defrosters. The Wolvhammers struck me as the only boots that were suitable for "standing around in the snow waiting for your event to start" kind of warm and SPD compatible. That being said, at 30F or warmer, they are overkill and your feet will be sweating pretty good.
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  27. #27
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    A few folks mentioned in one of the recent iterations of this thread that they were using Five Ten Impact Highs...kinda curious about these.

    How cold is too cold for these and/or how does sizing run esp. if you wanted to size up and run a thick sock?

  28. #28
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    I use the 510 impacts high with saint pedals when the snow is packed and I don't think I'll have to push the bike a lot. So far I have used than in the 20s with just wool biking socks with no issues. They seem to fit as sized and have a generous amount of room in the toe area. If I think I'm going to be off the bike alot. Then I wear northface boots.

  29. #29
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    Right, forgot about the walking in snow part.

    Well maybe the Stealth resole hack on another boot might be the ticket.

    Or maybe Five Ten should get on some sub-zero winter boot R & D. The first company to issue a lightweight and decently insulated sticky soled boot is gonna mint. They'll sell like wolvhammerhotcakes.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by frozenmonkey View Post
    Right, forgot about the walking in snow part.

    Well maybe the Stealth resole hack on another boot might be the ticket.

    Or maybe Five Ten should get on some sub-zero winter boot R & D. The first company to issue a lightweight and decently insulated sticky soled boot is gonna mint. They'll sell like wolvhammerhotcakes.
    The boot I linked is just that:
    Men?s Snowblade Waterproof Warm Boot

    So warm, flatfish soft rubber sole, and super light. Way lighter then Merrells, Sorels, etc. and just as warm.

    Rode both days this past weekend in single digits. No issues wore thick wigwam socks.
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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKCheesehead View Post
    Probably should do a search, but check out the 45NRTH Wolvhammers or the Lake winter boots. I have the 45NRTH's and ride a lot in temps well below zero.
    I have both of these boots with Shimano XT pedals. The 45NRTH's are a bit warmer, but more of a PITA to put on. I wear both with wool snowboard socks and with the LAKE's my toes are a bit red when riding for hours at sub 20F degree temps. Oddly, they don't feel cold, though.

    Both are too warm if it is over 35 degrees.
    Last edited by thegock; 02-03-2015 at 01:07 PM. Reason: more info
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by tedo View Post
    The boot I linked is just that:
    Men?s Snowblade Waterproof Warm Boot

    So warm, flatfish soft rubber sole, and super light. Way lighter then Merrells, Sorels, etc. and just as warm.

    Rode both days this past weekend in single digits. No issues wore thick wigwam socks.
    Agreed.

    I used a pair of TNF boots this weekend and they were great.

    With flat pedals obviously.

    Similar to these:

    http://www.backpacker.com/gear/footw...line-gtx-boot/
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  33. #33
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    I love when someone bumps a year old dead thread where the OP already got his answer, just to tell the world they got boots. I thought I had seen this before.
    ...Be careful what you're looking at because it might be looking back...

  34. #34
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    Whoa....13EEE?? I've had good luck with these boots:http://http://www.rei.com/product/83...ab-description and these vapor barrier liners:http://http://www.rbhdesigns.com/cat...0/footwear.htm.

    Maybe most important thing is choosing a boot with a nice roomy toe box. You don't want to constrict the flow of blood to your toes. Constriction leads to cold feet, no matter how much insulation you have.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by duggus View Post
    I love when someone bumps a year old dead thread where the OP already got his answer, just to tell the world they got boots. I thought I had seen this before.
    I guess I should have started a new thread regarding boots. Instead I searched boots, and got several results. I bumped the one that I thought had a lot of good options / choices (to keep them all in 1 place).

    My bad.

    (I also got some new Nukeproofs too. And a new waterbottle cage... both white).

    ---edit---
    The title of the thread is "what shoes or boots do you wear", not "what shoes or boots should I get".

    Big difference Bro-ham. It's a good thread to bump because of the title.
    Last edited by tedo; 02-03-2015 at 05:37 PM.
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  36. #36
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    I'm having a hell of a time trying to solve the cold feet problem. I'm using a heavy snow boot with various sock combos and chem toe warmers, and my feet freeze as soon as it drops below 10F or so (had plenty of minus 20F days with the w/c)

    I ordered a pair of Adidas Terrex Conrax CP Primaloft Boots which arrived today, but they're a 14 and too small. It's the biggest they make!

    I've tried Gander, Cabelas and Dunhams locally, but I can't find anything that would work with a bike, in my 14/15 size.
    I was about ready to pull the trigger on Wolvhammers, but heck if I can actually find someone who has a size 50 in stock!

    I'm leaning towards Lake 303's but too many people have said they're not that warm??

    And the clock's ticking down on winter fat biking fun....I can't afford to keep ordering stuff online and sending it back 'cos they don't fit. I dropped $25 on 2-day shipping on the Adidas so I could get 'em here before the weekend....now they're going back....what to do?
    [EDIT: sorry for the rant...just frustrated dealing with cold extremities]
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  37. #37
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    Maybe try something that fits over boots rather than inside. Adding more inside when there is not enough room just restricts blood flow to the foot. There are motorcycle rain boot covers that might work.

  38. #38
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  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by distracted View Post
    Maybe try something that fits over boots rather than inside. Adding more inside when there is not enough room just restricts blood flow to the foot. There are motorcycle rain boot covers that might work.
    Thanks for the suggestion. I've looked at overboots and protective covers. The problem I have is increasing the bulk on an already bulky boot/shoe. My current boots are a 14 and rub the cranks badly. If I try to ride with my feet planted a little wider apart it hurts my knees!
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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by rooze View Post
    I'm having a hell of a time trying to solve the cold feet problem. I'm using a heavy snow boot with various sock combos and chem toe warmers, and my feet freeze as soon as it drops below 10F or so (had plenty of minus 20F days with the w/c)

    I ordered a pair of Adidas Terrex Conrax CP Primaloft Boots which arrived today, but they're a 14 and too small. It's the biggest they make!

    I've tried Gander, Cabelas and Dunhams locally, but I can't find anything that would work with a bike, in my 14/15 size.
    I was about ready to pull the trigger on Wolvhammers, but heck if I can actually find someone who has a size 50 in stock!

    I'm leaning towards Lake 303's but too many people have said they're not that warm??

    And the clock's ticking down on winter fat biking fun....I can't afford to keep ordering stuff online and sending it back 'cos they don't fit. I dropped $25 on 2-day shipping on the Adidas so I could get 'em here before the weekend....now they're going back....what to do?
    [EDIT: sorry for the rant...just frustrated dealing with cold extremities]
    First of all, realize that you are going to have to throw money at this until it's solved. While it's sometimes hard to rationalize, in the end when you actually solve the issue, you'll swear the $$$ was well worth it.

    Some ideas:

    Spraying my feat with antiperspirant seems to help a lot and buy me a few more degrees. I spray my toes and then the inside of the sock in the toe-area.

    Plastic/composite/resin pedals are significantly better than metal for stopping heat loss. Your foot doesn't flex much while riding and having a big chunk of metal near it makes this worse. Not as bad as SPD pedals and boots, but still noticeable.

    As nice as those Adidas look, they don't really look to have enough insulation and be the type of boot you want out there. Start with 800 gram insulated boots and go up from there. You'll likely find some bigger sizes with hunting type boots, which can be had with lots of insulation, perfect for winter fat riding. I have these ones: Cabela's Berber Xtreme Hunting Boots : Cabela's but for your purpose, going down to the temps you are suggesting, I'd suggest at LEAST something like that, supposedly my boots are have the insulation properties of twice the actual rating, but whatever, again, I'd start with 800 gram insulation and go from there. The other realistic options would be wolfhammers or mountaineering type boots. Those adidas boots look wimpy by comparison. Again, you can often get the hunting boots quite large.

    You are going to have bulky boots, no way around it with your shoe size if you are going to have any kind of room for socks and such. I wear a normal 10.5-11 and bought the above boots in 12D. They are massive, but I can put silk sockliners on my feet and way thick wool socks over them, and still have plenty of room to move around my toes. Super important. Get wider pedals if you need to, or a 170mm bike that uses a narrower BB.

    Good snow gaiters buy you a few more degrees and obviously help when the snow is deep (but many of us wear them all the time for the added warmth).

    Yes, lake 303s are more "transition season" type boots for those of us that live and ride in cold climates. I even put the 302s on the stove in a big pan and heat them on low-heat to warm the soles up sometimes. It does seem to help and make a difference, compared to starting off with a heat-deficit if they were outside or kind of cold.

    Hotronics S4 boot-heaters do work quite well, I use them in my lakes to boost their ability to deal with cold temps. I can do slightly below zero for extended periods with them, but not much lower than zero, so if I know it's going to get down past -5, I don't even consider em. I put the heating element up beneath my toes, since that's what usually gets cold. When it was colder than -5 the other week though the rest of my foot in my 302s got cold and numb, so that was kind of painful for a while. This is NOT the solution for cold feet if you have SPD pedals/303s, it's still not warm enough when it's really cold.

    I've tried chem heaters for my feet, but it doesn't really work. Basically, it gets worse with time, as they lose heat, and you can't easily and quickly change them out. I find I lose more heat trying to do this than I capture, so it doesn't seem to work well, still, I haven't exhausted all the methods with them, I suppose letting them pre-heat for a while might help, but I can't imagine having to change them out mid-ride. I did it once and that was enough to know it's a dumb idea.

    Vapor barriers didn't work for me at all, my foot was swimming in a bunch of moisture/water and it was still cold. Colder than if I didn't have the barrier.

    I have terrible circulation in my extremities and I've found ways to deal with the cold and make me happy for hours on end. It's worth it, you just have to go as "extreme" as necessary, which may seem to you to be more than you need, but it's way way better to have more than you need than once again have not enough.
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  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    First of all, realize that you are going to have to throw money at this until it's solved. While it's sometimes hard to rationalize, in the end when you actually solve the issue, you'll swear the $$$ was well worth it.

    Some ideas:

    Spraying my feat with antiperspirant seems to help a lot and buy me a few more degrees.

    Plastic/composite/resin pedals are significantly better than metal for stopping heat loss. Your foot doesn't flex much while riding and having a big chunk of metal near it makes this worse. Not as bad as SPD pedals and boots, but still noticeable.

    As nice as those Adidas look, they don't really look to have enough insulation and be the type of boot you want out there. Start with 800 gram insulated boots and go up from there. You'll likely find some bigger sizes with hunting type boots, which can be had with lots of insulation, perfect for winter fat riding. I have these ones: Cabela's Berber Xtreme Hunting Boots : Cabela's but for your purpose, going down to the temps you are suggesting, I'd suggest at LEAST something like that, supposedly my boots are have the insulation properties of twice the actual rating, but whatever, again, I'd start with 800 gram insulation and go from there. The other realistic options would be wolfhammers or mountaineering type boots. Those adidas boots look wimpy by comparison. Again, you can often get the hunting boots quite large.

    Good snow gaiters buy you a few more degrees and obviously help when the snow is deep (but many of us wear them all the time).

    Yes, lake 303s are more "transition season" type boots for those of us that live and ride in cold climates.

    Hotronics S4 boot-heaters do work quite well, I use them in my lakes to boost their ability to deal with cold temps. I can do slightly below zero for extended periods with them, but not much lower than zero, so if I know it's going to get down past -5, I don't even consider em.

    Vapor barriers didn't work for me at all, my foot was swimming in a bunch of moisture/water and it was still cold. Colder than if I didn't have the barrier.
    Awesome information, thanks.

    I'll check out the boots you've suggested next. I've spent a couple hours again tonight reading reviews and looking at options from places like Amazon, Gander Mountain, Cabelas etc. It seems whenever I find something that isn't too bulky, and looks as though it might be warm enough, it isn't available in a size 15/50 !

    That's been a large part of the problem. I've tried on boots at the local places but they never have anything that fits with 2 pairs of socks. Sure, there are those with the huge chunky soles for shoveling the driveway, but I can't ride in them. They force my legs too far apart to clear the cranks, then after an hour or so my knees start to hurt!

    Anyway, I'm thinking along the lines of what you mentioned, some manner of heated insert. I went down that route a few weeks back, then I was put off making a purchase due to a lot of really negative reviews on Amazon. I forget the brand name of the item I looked at but it was suggested in this forum, I think.

    I accept that I may need to spend more than I'd wanted to, initially. The problem is time - it's running out. The winter that is
    Plus, I've searched all over the place tonight for Wolvhammers in a 50, but can't find a pair anywhere. I just emailed 45NRTH to see if they have a lead for me.

    Thanks again.

    PS - this is my first season winter riding, so I'm really starting from scratch. I've done pretty well apart from hands and feet. Of course with the bike and all the other clothing and accessories, the $outlay is really taking its toll.
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by rooze View Post
    Awesome information, thanks.

    I'll check out the boots you've suggested next. I've spent a couple hours again tonight reading reviews and looking at options from places like Amazon, Gander Mountain, Cabelas etc. It seems whenever I find something that isn't too bulky, and looks as though it might be warm enough, it isn't available in a size 15/50 !

    That's been a large part of the problem. I've tried on boots at the local places but they never have anything that fits with 2 pairs of socks. Sure, there are those with the huge chunky soles for shoveling the driveway, but I can't ride in them. They force my legs too far apart to clear the cranks, then after an hour or so my knees start to hurt!

    Anyway, I'm thinking along the lines of what you mentioned, some manner of heated insert. I went down that route a few weeks back, then I was put off making a purchase due to a lot of really negative reviews on Amazon. I forget the brand name of the item I looked at but it was suggested in this forum, I think.

    I accept that I may need to spend more than I'd wanted to, initially. The problem is time - it's running out. The winter that is
    Plus, I've searched all over the place tonight for Wolvhammers in a 50, but can't find a pair anywhere. I just emailed 45NRTH to see if they have a lead for me.

    Thanks again.

    PS - this is my first season winter riding, so I'm really starting from scratch. I've done pretty well apart from hands and feet. Of course with the bike and all the other clothing and accessories, the $outlay is really taking its toll.
    I had the cheaper (but still expensive) heated insoles with the battery in the insole, I have the more expensive ones now with the external battery and they are significantly warmer. Be warned though, they only heat where you place the element and insufficient insulation will still draw the heat out of your feet. These "boost" whatever boots you have, but IMO they don't make up for not having the right kind of boots, if that makes any sense. Being able to ride clipless more is worth it for me, but I have to throw in the towel too. It's predicted to stay cold (occasionally -s) here for a while, so the flats are staying on my bike.

    2 pairs of socks sounds a little strange, if anything, I'd go with some thin silk socks or liners, then normal "cold weather" socks. What has always seemed to make a difference is the boot insulation and empty space, having more "sock insulation" in the form of two socks has never seemed to work for me, it always seems better to leave that empty space, leaving your foot a little "loose" in the boot, this seems to provide for a warmer boot and less heat-transition, at least for me. Anyhow, I'd want enough "room" for 2 pairs of socks, I just would never wear em. Usually cabelas or someone has some thick socks to wear when trying on those kinds of shoes, you can probably judge pretty well, then order the boots if they make them in size 15 but only had 14 in the store.

    I don't think you are going to get around the bulky boots. Ride with the balls of your feet. Get pedals as wide as you can. Don't worry about the annodization, and go for it. Many of us ride with certain gear in the cold weather we wouldn't think of using in warmer weather, because it'd be just stupid, but we don't care how stupid we look when it gets cold.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  43. #43
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    Thanks again. I've tried various sock combinations, (thin/heavy, different materials etc) but no combination has really made any difference when the temps get below 15F or so.
    But whenever I go out trying on new boots I always wear 2 pairs of heavier socks, just to try and get the right fit (mostly it just eliminates everything I try on for being too small).

    I do agree that having some space in the boot is important.

    I use nylon platform pedals, the widest I could find, so no issues with cold transfer from a steel pedal or cleat.
    I hear you on the bulky boots. It might be my only option. Though as I mentioned, it gives my knees problems. I'm 50+ so I don't want to wreck myself any more if I can help it, lol.
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    I'm a big fan of neoprene socks to boost warmth. The best ones I've found are from Gator and they're fleece-lined they act as a vapor barrier and provide insulation at the same time. I would estimate this gives me a 10-20 degree "edge" compared with going without. Best of all your boots are dry at the end of the ride.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by playinVT View Post
    I'm a big fan of neoprene socks to boost warmth. The best ones I've found are from Gator and they're fleece-lined they act as a vapor barrier and provide insulation at the same time. I would estimate this gives me a 10-20 degree "edge" compared with going without. Best of all your boots are dry at the end of the ride.
    Thanks. I just ordered a pair of these Fleece Lined Neoprene Socks | Gator Sports

    If they give me an extra half hour I'll be happy..
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  46. #46
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    Bumping an old thread...

    Just picked these up 2 weeks ago for Winter Fat Biking and so far, so good. No cold feet when paired with some fleece socks that I own.

    Very light weight, 200 gram thinsulate and doesn't break the bank.

    http://www.amazon.com/Vasque-Snow-Ju...ue+snow+junkie

  47. #47
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    I use these North Face Snowsquall boots with Merino wool socks and flat side of pedals in winter and use spd side of pedals and my regular Specialized Tahoe shoes rest of the year.

    The North Face Snowsquall Mid Boot - Men's | Backcountry.com

    Wellgo WAM-D10 Pedals | SPD | platform | with cleats
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  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by rooze View Post
    Thanks again. I've tried various sock combinations, (thin/heavy, different materials etc) but no combination has really made any difference when the temps get below 15F or so.
    But whenever I go out trying on new boots I always wear 2 pairs of heavier socks, just to try and get the right fit (mostly it just eliminates everything I try on for being too small).
    Wearing multiple socks at once is likely the problem.

    Coming from a skiing background, multiple socks are a big no-no.

    Try wearing 1 pair of high quality wool ski socks.

    That will allow for smaller sized boots, better fit, and less issues.
    Mike
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  49. #49
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    my wife went out last night in single digits with her Uggs and a thin sock .Said she was never cold. Comfortable the whole time.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by gdb2b View Post
    I am a fatbike newbie within the last 6 weeks. Thoroughly hooked! I live in Michigan.
    What part of Michigan do you live in? Reason I ask is you can sometimes catch really good deals at the Wolverine headquarters in Rockford (near Grand Rapids).

    I got a pair of these last year and they're probably the best footwear I've ever owned.
    Very waterproof, warm, and I personally think they're sexy.

    http://amzn.to/1NFZsFk

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