Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 41
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    172

    Winter riding glasses/goggles

    Stomping around on the fatty last night in some low land/ river bottom areas after dark got me thinking about eye protection. Plan on being out in those areas this winter and don't want to take a stick in the eye. Anyone have any suggestions on eyewear, preferably clear? Anyone wear ski goggles? Something to keep the face/eyes warm also. This is my first winter and can't wait.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: buckfiddious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    775
    Quote Originally Posted by Raul34 View Post
    Stomping around on the fatty last night in some low land/ river bottom areas after dark got me thinking about eye protection. Plan on being out in those areas this winter and don't want to take a stick in the eye. Anyone have any suggestions on eyewear, preferably clear? Anyone wear ski goggles? Something to keep the face/eyes warm also. This is my first winter and can't wait.

    Thanks in advance.
    I usually just wear sunglasses or switch to clear lenses when it gets dark.

    Think of your clothes for fat biking the way you'd think about clothes for XC skiing, not downhill skiing.

    Your biggest problem is going to be shedding heat and moisture most of the time, not staying warm. Ski goggles are overkill- you will rarely be going anywhere close to fast enough to make them a good idea. Ditto with ski helmets- just wear your regular helmet with a thin fleece hat underneath.

    Just stick with your regular glasses and figure the second you stop, they are going to fog up.

    This worked for me down into the -10 to -15F range.

  3. #3
    SHF
    SHF is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    18
    Agree, I just use a pair of shop safety glasses like these and they work fine. Actually I wear them most of the year when it's cloudy or when riding early in the morning especially this time of year it stays dark quite late.

    well, I can't post images yet, but google force flex safety glasses to get an idea.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: blockphi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    644
    I, too, have a pair of safety glasses that I use in the warmer winter temps. They seem to work really well and are anti-fog. When it gets to -20 I do wear ski goggles to keep my eyes from freezing, but in general those types of temps only last a few weeks here in Anchorage, if we get that low at all. I find any glasses help keep the eyes warm when it gets cold out. If you go with Ski goggles, make sure they are as vented as possible as you will build up a lot of heat in them and they will start to fog even while moving. I also coat mine with Cat Crap which really helps keep them clear.

    You'll likely have to experiment with a number of different set ups until you find the one that works for you.

  5. #5
    Nuts
    Reputation: bdundee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    3,749
    Real cold days -10 -20f I do where ski goggles, they don't fog up like regular glasses do.

    Edit: I have had my eye balls fog up wearing regular glasses.
    Last edited by bdundee; 11-15-2012 at 10:24 AM.
    And I love beer!!

  6. #6
    Chronic Underachiever
    Reputation: MauricioB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    537
    Sunglasses and safety glasses work well for rides that are shorter and/or not windy. On longer or windier rides, you might run the risk of drying out your eyes.

    I managed to do just that in the 2011 Triple D. My vision started to get foggy toward the end of hour 6, and remained so after the end of the seven and a half hour race. I had initially thought it was just my contact lenses, but the fogginess remained even after taking them out. I called an ophthalmologist friend of mine, and she said, "oh, you probably just dried out your superficial epithelium a little. Lay down for a bit and put a warm compress on them." I did just that for maybe 20 minutes and and my vision was back to normal in a couple of hours.

    Still, I don't like to mess with that kind of thing, so this year I found a pair of motorcycle glasses with foam gaskets that ended up working really well. They tend to fog a bit, but much less so than ski goggles, with the added bonus of having bows and not a strap. Okay, so they look a little dorky:

    Mile Nine

    and yes, I know a little bit about the other options:

    Winter Panda

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    168
    Helmets - Ruroc

    what about these!!!!!!!!!!!

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    104
    I agree that safety or sunglasses make more sense than ski goggles.

    And for those mentioning issues with fogging, I've struggled with that for years as well. I just bought this stuff (see link below) and it's the only anti-fog I've used that actually works. Well worth the money to me.

    Amazon.com: MotoSolutions FogTech Anti-Fog 30ml Bottle Paintball or Glasses: Sports & Outdoors
    Taiwan could probably TIG weld a ham sandwich to a dictionary these days, but its been a while since they were doing brazing.

  9. #9
    Human Test Subject
    Reputation: Volsung's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    538
    I rocked clear Smith Monashee last winter. At about 10 degrees F my eyeballs get really cold and I end up squinting too much.

    Fogging depends a lot on where your breath goes. If you're not wearing a balaclava, most things wont fog up. My Monashees worked best with my Seirus balaclava or my beardski (google it, it's awesome).

    If I wear my Under Armour coldgear balaclava, all the heat and moisture from my breath goes up past my eyes and fogs up my goggles. If I'm not wearing goggles it gets on my eyelashes and freezes. Then I have to use one glove for snot wiping and one for eye wiping. Mixing them up can cause eye problems and also is just really gross. This is annoying so I don't wear it for long rides or when it's below 15.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    141
    Quote Originally Posted by buckfiddious View Post
    I usually just wear sunglasses or switch to clear lenses when it gets dark.

    Think of your clothes for fat biking the way you'd think about clothes for XC skiing, not downhill skiing.

    Your biggest problem is going to be shedding heat and moisture most of the time, not staying warm. Ski goggles are overkill- you will rarely be going anywhere close to fast enough to make them a good idea. Ditto with ski helmets- just wear your regular helmet with a thin fleece hat underneath.

    Just stick with your regular glasses and figure the second you stop, they are going to fog up.

    This worked for me down into the -10 to -15F range.
    We get temperatures down to -34 and -50 with a wind chill. Ski helmets and goggles are not out of the question here. Especially if it is snowing and windy.

  11. #11
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    3,935
    Year round I wear Wiley X Bricks. I have a dark pair and a clear pair. When it's cold out, I use the motorcycle insert that turns them into a motorcycle type goggle. Definitely protects my eyes from cold winds and protection from sticks and bugs and all else is great year round because of the wraparound style.
    I like turtles

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bprsnt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    287
    At 10F or colder I wear Ski Goggles. It maybe overkill but I would rather be comfortable.
    Stay warm and ride longer
    This is not a beauty pageant itís Fat biking.
    Moonlander's
    Sandman Hogger Ti

  13. #13
    will rant for food
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,703
    Quote Originally Posted by shawnymac View Post
    Helmets - Ruroc

    what about these!!!!!!!!!!!
    I'll admit that I'm curious about them.
    Latitude: 44.93 N

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yoreskillz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    236
    Ruroc review: RuRoC RG-1 Helmet System Ė Full Metal Review | FAT-BIKE.COM

    "At the end of the day, while the RuRoC will be more helmet than most snow bikers need, I canít dismiss its potential."

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    48
    these a cheap and work great
    Amazon.com: Global Vision Hercules Sunglasses w/Yellow Lenses: Sports & Outdoors

    when it gets colder I'll slap the goggles on, just got some cheap(er) smiths

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    430
    Safety goggles just to keep the cold air out of my eyes, I specifically find a pair that sit tight against my forehead to keep my eyes from drying out.

  17. #17
    Laramie, Wyoming
    Reputation: alphazz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,163
    Everyone has different winter riding conditions. If riding where the wind is really bad, glasses don't give enough eye protection from the cold.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    83
    Here's my face setup for 10F and warmer -


    I wear Rx and don't like contacts so...
    -Rudy Project Horus with interchangeable clear/tinted lenses.
    -Helmet + hi-vis helmet cover (also blocks wind)
    -balaclava (I have several depending on the exact temperature/wind)

    Key part: glass fogging and cold weather induced asthma sucks. To try and prevent or limit both of these, I bought a snowmobile breath deflector for ~$8. I then went to the local hobby store and pulled out my middle school sewing skills to put on an elastic strap. This ensures a tight seals below the eyes and goes a long way to improving fogging. Also makes a nice micro-climate for breathing.

    When it's colder than 10F, my eyes dry out too fast and I throw on a pair of goggles. At that temperature, I create a really sweet breathcicle off the tip of the breath deflector.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Smallfurry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    413
    I have some cheapo EBay ski glasses. Separate yellow lenses, on foam backed plastic, with a nose hinge, and elastic strap. Nice design for winter riding. the hinge means you can pop them in a pocket safely.

    They have poor qualiy lenses though.

    Tepted by the funky PDW foldable ones.
    A big boy did it, and ran away.
    62*28'

  20. #20
    CAMBA Creature.
    Reputation: KrateKraig's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    219
    I've been using my vintage Oakley Factory Pilots.
    Enough face coverage for warmth, don't fog too much, and I've got about 5 or 6 different lenses.
    A "Buff" around the neck, if it gets really cold it's good to cover the exposed skin.
    eSpeCially CrAzy IrRegular TrailBuildin' Crew
    Chequama Mama

    MTB: Mukluk/Moonlander/Super V-1.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Steve Balogh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    545

    Different combinations

    In order of warm to below freezing, I usually wear:

    1. Standard bike helmet + Oakley sunglasses
    2. Same as 1. but with a helmet cover
    3. Same as 2. with a neck covering
    4. Giro snowboard helmet with the Oakleys and neck covering
    5. Giro snowboard helmet with ski goggles and neck covering

    In some cases of being near 32deg F + I'll wear the ski goggles after a heavy snowfall. Usually after a heavy snow fall many trees will have low-lying limbs to plow through, not something glasses do a good job with - they do provide eye protection, but getting snow dumped over them is not fun.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    73
    Quote Originally Posted by Volsung View Post
    I rocked clear Smith Monashee last winter. At about 10 degrees F my eyeballs get really cold and I end up squinting too much.

    Fogging depends a lot on where your breath goes. If you're not wearing a balaclava, most things wont fog up. My Monashees worked best with my Seirus balaclava or my beardski (google it, it's awesome).

    If I wear my Under Armour coldgear balaclava, all the heat and moisture from my breath goes up past my eyes and fogs up my goggles. If I'm not wearing goggles it gets on my eyelashes and freezes. Then I have to use one glove for snot wiping and one for eye wiping. Mixing them up can cause eye problems and also is just really gross. This is annoying so I don't wear it for long rides or when it's below 15.
    Bearski?? LOL...yeah man they are awesome! I am waiting on two that I ordered from Amazon. One for me and one for my brother as X mas present. I can't wait to get them!

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    73
    Oh...forgot to say that I use a pair of goggles when it gets cold out and would not go without. My eyes tear up in just modest cold air and then I can't see at all. The goggle stop all of that.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Greenfin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    230
    Well here in Anchorage I ware goggles almost every morning once it is below 30F. I start out of my driveway with a 1/2 mile down hill, topping out my gears (2X10) half way down the hill. I carry that high speed for another 1/2 mile before regular speeds show up. My eyes water like crazy if I don't ware the goggles in the AM. I almost never, regardless of temp, ware my goggles or anything else for the ride home. It is my experience that if I ride hard anything on my face will fog up and freeze.
    Still cleaning my Fatback.
    It's a life style.

  25. #25
    Ologist
    Reputation: Valhalla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    952
    I find goggles for most riding in the Matanuska Valley to be overkill. I think I used them twice last year (once in a snowstorm). My Smith Pivlok V2 Max have provided enough coverage for riding down to -20 F or so (usually dont choose to ride any colder than that). The ability to change from clear to different yellow, amber, and polarized lenses within seconds has been a huge plus. There is a new pair for almost half off here in the classifieds.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •