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  1. #1
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    Winter riding glasses/goggles

    Stomping around on the fatty last night in some low land/ river bottom areas after dark got me thinking about eye protection. Plan on being out in those areas this winter and don't want to take a stick in the eye. Anyone have any suggestions on eyewear, preferably clear? Anyone wear ski goggles? Something to keep the face/eyes warm also. This is my first winter and can't wait.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raul34 View Post
    Stomping around on the fatty last night in some low land/ river bottom areas after dark got me thinking about eye protection. Plan on being out in those areas this winter and don't want to take a stick in the eye. Anyone have any suggestions on eyewear, preferably clear? Anyone wear ski goggles? Something to keep the face/eyes warm also. This is my first winter and can't wait.

    Thanks in advance.
    I usually just wear sunglasses or switch to clear lenses when it gets dark.

    Think of your clothes for fat biking the way you'd think about clothes for XC skiing, not downhill skiing.

    Your biggest problem is going to be shedding heat and moisture most of the time, not staying warm. Ski goggles are overkill- you will rarely be going anywhere close to fast enough to make them a good idea. Ditto with ski helmets- just wear your regular helmet with a thin fleece hat underneath.

    Just stick with your regular glasses and figure the second you stop, they are going to fog up.

    This worked for me down into the -10 to -15F range.

  3. #3
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    Agree, I just use a pair of shop safety glasses like these and they work fine. Actually I wear them most of the year when it's cloudy or when riding early in the morning especially this time of year it stays dark quite late.

    well, I can't post images yet, but google force flex safety glasses to get an idea.

  4. #4
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    I, too, have a pair of safety glasses that I use in the warmer winter temps. They seem to work really well and are anti-fog. When it gets to -20 I do wear ski goggles to keep my eyes from freezing, but in general those types of temps only last a few weeks here in Anchorage, if we get that low at all. I find any glasses help keep the eyes warm when it gets cold out. If you go with Ski goggles, make sure they are as vented as possible as you will build up a lot of heat in them and they will start to fog even while moving. I also coat mine with Cat Crap which really helps keep them clear.

    You'll likely have to experiment with a number of different set ups until you find the one that works for you.

  5. #5
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    Real cold days -10 -20f I do where ski goggles, they don't fog up like regular glasses do.

    Edit: I have had my eye balls fog up wearing regular glasses.
    Last edited by bdundee; 11-15-2012 at 11:24 AM.

  6. #6
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    Sunglasses and safety glasses work well for rides that are shorter and/or not windy. On longer or windier rides, you might run the risk of drying out your eyes.

    I managed to do just that in the 2011 Triple D. My vision started to get foggy toward the end of hour 6, and remained so after the end of the seven and a half hour race. I had initially thought it was just my contact lenses, but the fogginess remained even after taking them out. I called an ophthalmologist friend of mine, and she said, "oh, you probably just dried out your superficial epithelium a little. Lay down for a bit and put a warm compress on them." I did just that for maybe 20 minutes and and my vision was back to normal in a couple of hours.

    Still, I don't like to mess with that kind of thing, so this year I found a pair of motorcycle glasses with foam gaskets that ended up working really well. They tend to fog a bit, but much less so than ski goggles, with the added bonus of having bows and not a strap. Okay, so they look a little dorky:

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/mababo/6750470589/" title="Mile Nine by Uncle Bicycle, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7153/6750470589_7147de9a05_m.jpg" width="240" height="240" alt="Mile Nine"></a>

    and yes, I know a little bit about the other options:

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/mababo/5303627385/" title="Winter Panda by Uncle Bicycle, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5128/5303627385_d1a80c4e43_m.jpg" width="180" height="240" alt="Winter Panda"></a>

  7. #7
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    Helmets - Ruroc

    what about these!!!!!!!!!!!

  8. #8
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    I agree that safety or sunglasses make more sense than ski goggles.

    And for those mentioning issues with fogging, I've struggled with that for years as well. I just bought this stuff (see link below) and it's the only anti-fog I've used that actually works. Well worth the money to me.

    Amazon.com: MotoSolutions FogTech Anti-Fog 30ml Bottle Paintball or Glasses: Sports & Outdoors
    Taiwan could probably TIG weld a ham sandwich to a dictionary these days, but its been a while since they were doing brazing.

  9. #9
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    I rocked clear Smith Monashee last winter. At about 10 degrees F my eyeballs get really cold and I end up squinting too much.

    Fogging depends a lot on where your breath goes. If you're not wearing a balaclava, most things wont fog up. My Monashees worked best with my Seirus balaclava or my beardski (google it, it's awesome).

    If I wear my Under Armour coldgear balaclava, all the heat and moisture from my breath goes up past my eyes and fogs up my goggles. If I'm not wearing goggles it gets on my eyelashes and freezes. Then I have to use one glove for snot wiping and one for eye wiping. Mixing them up can cause eye problems and also is just really gross. This is annoying so I don't wear it for long rides or when it's below 15.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckfiddious View Post
    I usually just wear sunglasses or switch to clear lenses when it gets dark.

    Think of your clothes for fat biking the way you'd think about clothes for XC skiing, not downhill skiing.

    Your biggest problem is going to be shedding heat and moisture most of the time, not staying warm. Ski goggles are overkill- you will rarely be going anywhere close to fast enough to make them a good idea. Ditto with ski helmets- just wear your regular helmet with a thin fleece hat underneath.

    Just stick with your regular glasses and figure the second you stop, they are going to fog up.

    This worked for me down into the -10 to -15F range.
    We get temperatures down to -34 and -50 with a wind chill. Ski helmets and goggles are not out of the question here. Especially if it is snowing and windy.

  11. #11
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    Year round I wear Wiley X Bricks. I have a dark pair and a clear pair. When it's cold out, I use the motorcycle insert that turns them into a motorcycle type goggle. Definitely protects my eyes from cold winds and protection from sticks and bugs and all else is great year round because of the wraparound style.
    I like turtles

  12. #12
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    At 10F or colder I wear Ski Goggles. It maybe overkill but I would rather be comfortable.
    Stay warm and ride longer
    This is not a beauty pageant it’s Fat biking.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by shawnymac View Post
    Helmets - Ruroc

    what about these!!!!!!!!!!!
    I'll admit that I'm curious about them.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  14. #14
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    Ruroc review: RuRoC RG-1 Helmet System – Full Metal Review | FAT-BIKE.COM

    "At the end of the day, while the RuRoC will be more helmet than most snow bikers need, I can’t dismiss its potential."

  15. #15
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    these a cheap and work great
    Amazon.com: Global Vision Hercules Sunglasses w/Yellow Lenses: Sports & Outdoors

    when it gets colder I'll slap the goggles on, just got some cheap(er) smiths

  16. #16
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    Safety goggles just to keep the cold air out of my eyes, I specifically find a pair that sit tight against my forehead to keep my eyes from drying out.

  17. #17
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    Everyone has different winter riding conditions. If riding where the wind is really bad, glasses don't give enough eye protection from the cold.

  18. #18
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    Here's my face setup for 10F and warmer -


    I wear Rx and don't like contacts so...
    -Rudy Project Horus with interchangeable clear/tinted lenses.
    -Helmet + hi-vis helmet cover (also blocks wind)
    -balaclava (I have several depending on the exact temperature/wind)

    Key part: glass fogging and cold weather induced asthma sucks. To try and prevent or limit both of these, I bought a snowmobile breath deflector for ~$8. I then went to the local hobby store and pulled out my middle school sewing skills to put on an elastic strap. This ensures a tight seals below the eyes and goes a long way to improving fogging. Also makes a nice micro-climate for breathing.

    When it's colder than 10F, my eyes dry out too fast and I throw on a pair of goggles. At that temperature, I create a really sweet breathcicle off the tip of the breath deflector.

  19. #19
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    I have some cheapo EBay ski glasses. Separate yellow lenses, on foam backed plastic, with a nose hinge, and elastic strap. Nice design for winter riding. the hinge means you can pop them in a pocket safely.

    They have poor qualiy lenses though.

    Tepted by the funky PDW foldable ones.
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  20. #20
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    I've been using my vintage Oakley Factory Pilots.
    Enough face coverage for warmth, don't fog too much, and I've got about 5 or 6 different lenses.
    A "Buff" around the neck, if it gets really cold it's good to cover the exposed skin.
    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/FTuUbNeLYlXoLn5GOJXbr9MTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=e mbedwebsite"><img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-ZXFdAZtaC7g/TZEhqKX8QvI/AAAAAAAABLo/psLnCzMzDgE/s640/DSCN8402.JPG" height="640" width="480" /></a>
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  21. #21
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    Different combinations

    In order of warm to below freezing, I usually wear:

    1. Standard bike helmet + Oakley sunglasses
    2. Same as 1. but with a helmet cover
    3. Same as 2. with a neck covering
    4. Giro snowboard helmet with the Oakleys and neck covering
    5. Giro snowboard helmet with ski goggles and neck covering

    In some cases of being near 32deg F + I'll wear the ski goggles after a heavy snowfall. Usually after a heavy snow fall many trees will have low-lying limbs to plow through, not something glasses do a good job with - they do provide eye protection, but getting snow dumped over them is not fun.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Volsung View Post
    I rocked clear Smith Monashee last winter. At about 10 degrees F my eyeballs get really cold and I end up squinting too much.

    Fogging depends a lot on where your breath goes. If you're not wearing a balaclava, most things wont fog up. My Monashees worked best with my Seirus balaclava or my beardski (google it, it's awesome).

    If I wear my Under Armour coldgear balaclava, all the heat and moisture from my breath goes up past my eyes and fogs up my goggles. If I'm not wearing goggles it gets on my eyelashes and freezes. Then I have to use one glove for snot wiping and one for eye wiping. Mixing them up can cause eye problems and also is just really gross. This is annoying so I don't wear it for long rides or when it's below 15.
    Bearski?? LOL...yeah man they are awesome! I am waiting on two that I ordered from Amazon. One for me and one for my brother as X mas present. I can't wait to get them!

  23. #23
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    Oh...forgot to say that I use a pair of goggles when it gets cold out and would not go without. My eyes tear up in just modest cold air and then I can't see at all. The goggle stop all of that.

  24. #24
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    Well here in Anchorage I ware goggles almost every morning once it is below 30F. I start out of my driveway with a 1/2 mile down hill, topping out my gears (2X10) half way down the hill. I carry that high speed for another 1/2 mile before regular speeds show up. My eyes water like crazy if I don't ware the goggles in the AM. I almost never, regardless of temp, ware my goggles or anything else for the ride home. It is my experience that if I ride hard anything on my face will fog up and freeze.
    Still cleaning my Fatback.
    It's a life style.

  25. #25
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    I find goggles for most riding in the Matanuska Valley to be overkill. I think I used them twice last year (once in a snowstorm). My Smith Pivlok V2 Max have provided enough coverage for riding down to -20 F or so (usually dont choose to ride any colder than that). The ability to change from clear to different yellow, amber, and polarized lenses within seconds has been a huge plus. There is a new pair for almost half off here in the classifieds.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yoreskillz View Post
    Ruroc review: RuRoC RG-1 Helmet System – Full Metal Review | FAT-BIKE.COM

    "At the end of the day, while the RuRoC will be more helmet than most snow bikers need, I can’t dismiss its potential."
    F1 Pit crew helmet...might need to pick one up

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTR2ebike View Post
    F1 Pit crew helmet...might need to pick one up
    Those are cool, I could be Darth freakin Vader!

  28. #28
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    I have a pair of Smith turbo fan goggles. They're a little heavy, but mostly work as advertised. If I stop, I can still fog them up, and switching them to high speed will clear it up within 10 seconds. The high speed is the only real audible mode once breathing hard.

    Still, I'd rather have goggles that didn't fog up to begin with. I might try the snowmobile deflector idea per OUWxGuesser.

    Does anyone have experience with Cat Crap or Fogtech?
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  29. #29
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    One thing to watch for if you are picking out ski helmet for biking.
    Some have a tendency, especially those with visors, can tilt forward obstructing your view especially if you have the weight of a headlamp on the front. I love my snowboard helmet and it's warm when it's really cold out, but I just reminded my self how much it sucks for biking last night.

  30. #30
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    how to keep the tip of the nose from freezing ?

    Yesterday I was riding for 1.5 hours of so at 10-12F (some wind) and while I was plenty warm - the tip of my nose that was not covered by my goggles started to show signs of frostbite. I prefer not to wear a full mouth/nose covering bacalava as it restricts breathing and causes fogging. Seems that I rememberfrom my Motox days that some goggles could be had with a roost protecting nose cover? I just need something to keep the wind off - while not restricting breathing. When I cover my nose with a face mask - I will even fog goggles on a hard and long ride on a xc winter trail.
    Thoughts?? Ideas?? thanks!

  31. #31
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    If Huffy made an airplane, would you fly in it?

  32. #32
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    I just snagged some cheap used Oakley O-Frames off craigslist. I bought them off a teenager, who pulled up next to me in his car and rolled the window down, handed them over to me... I strapped them on my face, handed him a $20, and took off.

  33. #33
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    jtc1, for your nose, courtesy of jeffscott on the commuter forum...

    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    Smith Products | SmithOptics.com

    These will keep you frost free to -36 C.

    They come with a bag to prevent scratching.

    Double lens are absolute requirement....

    Also a nose guard is the last thing that prevents fogging (and frostbite).

    Yellow or clear lenses.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtc1 View Post
    Yesterday I was riding for 1.5 hours of so at 10-12F (some wind) and while I was plenty warm - the tip of my nose that was not covered by my goggles started to show signs of frostbite. I prefer not to wear a full mouth/nose covering bacalava as it restricts breathing and causes fogging. Seems that I rememberfrom my Motox days that some goggles could be had with a roost protecting nose cover? I just need something to keep the wind off - while not restricting breathing. When I cover my nose with a face mask - I will even fog goggles on a hard and long ride on a xc winter trail.
    Thoughts?? Ideas?? thanks!
    Not knowing what brand of goggles you are wearing...but there are a few companies that make a nose guard/protector/beak for goggles:

    Scott Nose Guard at Motorcycle Superstore
    Beko Nose Guard | Accessories Sun Protection
    Moto Goggles -> Nose Guard | Page 1 | Spy Optic MX Goggles, Sunglasses and Snow Goggles | SpyOptic Official Site

    One could be easily added with some velcro and a appropriately sized/cut piece of microfleece or similar type of material?

  35. #35
    Laramie, Wyoming
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    I use open face snowmobile goggles and they work great for me. They keep my eyes from getting cold and I rarely have fogging issues. Klim or 509 make good ones.

  36. #36
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    Clear, dual-lensed ski goggles for -10C and below...

    All: In Whitehorse where the winter nights are 20 hours long, and record lows are in the minus 50C range, I wear Uvex Genesis safety goggles over a neoprene face mask down to -10C, then below that clear, dual-lense ski goggles from MEC.ca, and a 200wt pile neck tube up over my nose. Helmet is oversized to fit over 2 windproof balaclavas. Works for me!

  37. #37
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    I think the key is separating out why you are fogging- the breath deflector essentially eliminates the issue due to breath coming up for me. I still have problems with my eyeglasses fogging if I am doing some serious work and sweating alot. The vapor coming off even that limited area of my face is enough to fog glasses.

    The fogging itself is OK if I can get moving quick enough or decrease my workload so that it evaporates. The problem is if you spend more than a few minutes fogged, at the temperatures I have the problem, it freezes and at that point I'm hosed. Luckily my eyesight is OK enough that I can ride with only my goggles and still make my way around town. I've never fogged the goggles. Can't do any technical stuff or read street signs without my rx.

    I haven't had any luck with products such as cat crap. I haven't found an anti-fog solution that works well in really cold temperatures.

  38. #38
    will rant for food
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewQ View Post
    I agree that safety or sunglasses make more sense than ski goggles.

    And for those mentioning issues with fogging, I've struggled with that for years as well. I just bought this stuff (see link below) and it's the only anti-fog I've used that actually works. Well worth the money to me.

    Amazon.com: MotoSolutions FogTech Anti-Fog 30ml Bottle Paintball or Glasses: Sports & Outdoors
    I tried FogTech tonight. Outside was a rather comfortable 9 F, 60% humidity, no wind. Wiley X Gravity glasses (with foam gasket), and a minimally vented balaclava covering my mouth and nose, which is usually a recipe for instant fog for me.

    I applied to both sides of each lens pretty liberally. I knew I was using too much when bubbles were present. Conversely, not applying enough makes for no positive difference in condensation.

    Anyway, it worked. I shouldn't be amazed by seeing clearly and without tears in the year 2013, but I was amazed regardless. I could take off my glasses and breathe directly on them, and fog formed on the small parts of the lens that I didn't coat.

    EDIT: I stopped using my Smith fan goggles because I found their weakness: they get rid of fog after it forms. If it is so cold that any fog immediately freezes, then the fan understandably does nothing.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  39. #39
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    I forgot to note a little bit of visual distortion after applying FogTech. Like I applied too much on one part of the lens... similar to looking through a stained glass window, or through the surface of a lake into shallow sand, but very muted compared to those two examples. Still, a friend of mine said this distortion gave him vertigo. Not so for me. Just something to consider if you are on the fence and get dizzy from that sort of effect.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  40. #40
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    just get goggles.
    try them on, make sure you have as much peripheral vision as possible.
    anyone who says otherwise probably isn't riding through blizzards.
    you may not intend to either but if you're caught in a storm- visibility is your way out of the trees.
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  41. #41
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    I just got a new pair of Oakley Splice goggles and really like them.

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