Winter Clothing?

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  • 09-20-2012
    cutthroat
    For riding here in Colorado I wear the same stuff I wear when back-country skiing, except the boots. Wool is great since it doesn't get stinky nearly as fast as polypro. I don't bother with a helmet unless I have some road sections to share with cars. Multiple layers is the key of course to controlling your temperature. Probably the biggest variable for snow riders is what they put on their feet - there's all sorts of options and solutions out there depending on whether you like flats or clips.
  • 09-20-2012
    JAGI410
    I've tried several combos, but the key pieces that are constant are Moose Mitt pogies, Keen Brixen Boots, and Foxwear pants. The balaclavas, helmets, jackets, etc haven't impressed me enough to recommend to others.

    Anyone else getting excited for snow?!
  • 09-20-2012
    damnitman
    ...stay away from cotton anything...
  • 09-22-2012
    ThreePutt
    Ninjaclava
    I have a bunch of good stuff but one of my favorite pieces is the OR Ninjaclava. Blocks the wind, warm, breathes well, and adjustable.

    Ninjaclava | Outdoor Research | Designed By Adventure
  • 09-22-2012
    Valhalla
    Patagonia R1 Hoody
  • 09-23-2012
    Jaredbe
    I love my Dogwood designs pogies. I think they are the best made. For a great list of pogies options see this article. http://fat-bike.com/2012/01/pogies-k...e-digits-warm/

    Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2
  • 09-25-2012
    joboo
    Everyone's giving solid advice; which is par for the course for the FatBike crowd here.
    #1 for me hands, Dogwoods Design Plus Pogies.... Check.
    #2 anything from Lou @ Foxwear!! I can't say enough good things about the man!! Actually call him and he'll walk ya through what you need.
    #3 good winter boots; my choice as of right now, Rocky 1,000 gram thin.
    Waiting for the 45NRTHS though.
    Peace
  • 11-09-2012
    edicviz
    A lot of good things have been said about clothing already, stay away from cotton and non-breathing materials, dress to be cool (as in cold) when you start because you will heat up, keep feet and fingers cozy.

    My contribution will be the game-changer (if you don't mind looking silly):
    Airtrim breathingfilter asthma sport cold airways

    It makes riding in any sub zero celsius temperature comfortable for the airways (keeps me healthy) and lets you ride with less clothing because you lose less heat through breathing.

    The look may bias you towards night-riding. :)
  • 11-09-2012
    gecho
    I've commuted 16km each way for the past 2 winters. One important thing to keep in mind is that you need less clothing riding than when you are stopped. And when you do stop your temperature will begin to fall very fast. I always carry an extra upper body layer or two when I ride in the winter.

    I use a heavy army surplus wool sweater as an outer layer. Its warm but allows moisture to pass through instead of trapping it. Below -15C the moisture instantly freezes when it hits the cold air and I get a snowy buildup.

    -20C this day:
    http://i969.photobucket.com/albums/a...inter_ride.jpg
  • 11-09-2012
    tracerprix
    I love it!
  • 11-09-2012
    Jay P
  • 11-09-2012
    blockphi
    My best advice: Hit up the local thrift stores. Start there building up a kit to find out what works for you and then upgrade to nicer/newer once you are fairly well dialed in.

    My kit for temps from -10 to 10 F is as follows:

    Base:
    Patagonia Capalien long johns
    Underarmor Metal longsleeve cold weather shirt (2 bucks at my local thrift...!)

    Midlayer
    Midweight tights (Paradox fleece)
    Long Sleeve Underarmor t-shirt

    Outer
    Novarra Headwind pants
    REI lightwieght XC ski jacket
    Novarra rain shell

    Feet
    one or two layers of wool socks
    Keen winter boots

    Hands
    Black Diamond Guide Gloves (toasty)

    Head
    standard weight Buff
    Windstopper stocking cap
    glasses or ski goggles

    Keeps me toasty throughout the ride. It's taken three years to get to where I have this kit system down pat, and I slowly picked up better quality items throughout the summer months and when on sale.

    If it is above 10 or below -10, I adjust a bit, but the base of the kit for me are the headwind pants, the wool socks, and the two jackets.
  • 11-09-2012
    Mr Pink57
    Most of the winter in MN I can get away with:

    Head
    Cannondale Alpaca beanie
    Helmet....
    Rapha merino wool gator (pulls over face also if needed)
    Sometimes I use a full face with goggles but that is on the craziest of days

    Upper Body
    Helly Hanson base layer
    Nashbar Sofshell (good from 50f to 10f)
    Isotoner gloves or Dakine ski gloves for really cold along with a liner

    Lower Body
    Bibs (thicker set I got on ebay $30 each)
    Starter cold spandex long ($12 at walmart)
    Twin Six Knickers

    Feet
    Any sock really as long as it's not cotton
    Enduro shoe covers
    I have also taped the shoe underneath with duct tape including under the insole to stop all wind.
  • 11-10-2012
    akclimber49
    Last winter was my first time biking in cold weather. I found that the most of the same things I would wear for BC skiing apply to biking in cold snowy weather.

    Base: Ibex 3/4 length cycling "knickers"
    Ibex Wool T-shirt(very noce next to skin layer)
    Wool sox

    Outer layers change depending on Conditions
    Cold and dry I will wear Patagonia guide pants over my "knickers" (love that word)
    Ibex hoody and a light wind breaker.
    If it is snowy I generally wear bibs.
    meduim weight liner gloves with OR shell mitts( I am going to try pogies this year)
    Patagonia balaclava,bike helmet(with the vents taped off), eye protection of some kind,goggles work better than I thought they would(no fogging issues)
    Sorrel boots with gaiters(this year I am going to try overboots).

    I always carry a down insulating layer for my upper body,Patagonia down sweater light and real warm,an extra hat and liner gloves come in handy too. I found that when I stop I cool down real quick,it sucks to fix a flat while you are cold! Hope this helps. Happy riding:D
  • 12-19-2012
    Derek.Endress
    GoreWear Cold system?
    Is anyone familiar with the Gore wear system?

    I am intrigued with some of the components potentially mixed in with vapour barrier layers esp. upper body, as I wet out my torso/back easily. Typically my IceBreaker (NZ merino wool) baselayer is soaking wet (yet still warm) after I get home from a 2 hour fatbike ride at temps varying -15c to -30c. I have lots of technical gear from xc and alpine mountaineering systems yet would like to look at bike specific for longer trips. Also just watched JayP vid and he makes strong points as to what he is using as we have the same conditions here as AK, as he mentions Nome a number of times with regards to pieces of clothing that have been there :)

    Men's ALP-X COLD SYSTEM | GORE BIKE WEARŪ
  • 12-19-2012
    Valhalla
    I think JayP has it dialed in. I use pretty much the same set up. I dont think the Gore System offers anything that garments from nordic skiing or alpine climbing don't already offer. The only true vapor barrier I am using is the RBH socks.

    What are you wearing over your wool layer? I think it is pretty important on longer trips to not have that layer soaking wet. It may mean riding in less layers and like when climbing, getting that heavier insulation on anytime you stop for more than a few minutes.
  • 12-19-2012
    Derek.Endress
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Valhalla View Post
    I think JayP has it dialed in. I use pretty much the same set up. I dont think the Gore System offers anything that garments from nordic skiing or alpine climbing don't already offer. The only true vapor barrier I am using is the RBH socks.

    What are you wearing over your wool layer? I think it is pretty important on longer trips to not have that layer soaking wet. It may mean riding in less layers and like when climbing, getting that heavier insulation on anytime you stop for more than a few minutes.

    I wear a light weight RP fleece hoodie with offset zipper by Patagonia(use hood when I need another layer on my head) as I have a Mammut Windstopper Skull cap I wear under my Salomon ski helmet) and then a lightweight running/xc style hi-collar jacket by Marmot made out of very thin nylon with pit mesh venting.

    I think I will look into RBH via net and see what they might have. Also quite keen on Mont Bell clothing as I used to have some of their stuff in the 80's yet not sure its available in Canada anymore. Had it when it was manufactured out of Japan.

    On my hands I wear light weight BD fleece glove with leather palm and Dogwood Designs pogies (not the super insulated ones) :thumbsup:
  • 12-19-2012
    G-reg
    Wool base / mid layers. I'm like my Ibex / Icebreaker / Patagucci. But even cheap wool is pretty damn good stuff, as long as it's actually wool. One of my favorite items are the socks the Military issued me, thick and simple.

    I just picked up some Gore Alp X pants to replace the Craft XC pants I'd been using for 5ish years. They are "wind block" specific, so giving up some water proofness in the name of breathability, perfect for the wind chills I see here in ND/MN. Has me tempted to drop the coin on a jacket too.

    As far as feet go, I prefer a proper clipless pedal cycling shoe. That really narrows it down to the Lakes or 45N's. If I was starting from scratch I'd say the Wolfhummers are worth the cost, I can't convince myself they are are worth upgrading from the Lakes though. I like the 45N insoles and think they are worth it over the stock Lake insoles. Order a few sizes bigger than your normal shoe size, but don't go crazy. The reason you are looking to clipless compatible boots is to keep the pedaling efficiency of being clipped in. Having a monster shoe and a crap ton of socks will negate that benefit if you go too crazy. Go with an overboot if things are that cold/your feet suck, and if that won't cut it go with a boot/flat pedal.

    I like ski/snowboard helmets too, cheap and work a eleventeen times better than a hat under a standard cycling helmet.
  • 12-19-2012
    Derek.Endress
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by G-reg View Post
    Wool base / mid layers. I'm like my Ibex / Icebreaker / Patagucci. But even cheap wool is pretty damn good stuff, as long as it's actually wool. One of my favorite items are the socks the Military issued me, thick and simple.

    I just picked up some Gore Alp X pants to replace the Craft XC pants I'd been using for 5ish years. They are "wind block" specific, so giving up some water proofness in the name of breathability, perfect for the wind chills I see here in ND/MN. Has me tempted to drop the coin on a jacket too.

    As far as feet go, I prefer a proper clipless pedal cycling shoe. That really narrows it down to the Lakes or 45N's. If I was starting from scratch I'd say the Wolfhummers are worth the cost, I can't convince myself they are are worth upgrading from the Lakes though. I like the 45N insoles and think they are worth it over the stock Lake insoles. Order a few sizes bigger than your normal shoe size, but don't go crazy. The reason you are looking to clipless compatible boots is to keep the pedaling efficiency of being clipped in. Having a monster shoe and a crap ton of socks will negate that benefit if you go too crazy. Go with an overboot if things are that cold/your feet suck, and if that won't cut it go with a boot/flat pedal.

    I like ski/snowboard helmets too, cheap and work a eleventeen times better than a hat under a standard cycling helmet.

    For fatbiking I use flats with a heat moldable 'Intuition' liner (used for Alpine Touring and Telemark ski boots) with a set of older and lighter NEOS overboots. The new ones seem quite heavy, cumbersome and not nearly as well made compared to what NEOS put out 10-15 years ago. Just picked up a new overboot system out of Finland that is waterproof and breathable yet have not tried them as it has been -37c during the day here and looking like to be in that range for the next week!! Uuuggghhh!!

    Did you pick up the Alp X bibs by Gore?
  • 12-19-2012
    Valhalla
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Derek.Endress View Post
    ... and Dogwood Designs pogies (not the super insulated ones) :thumbsup:

    I am pretty sure you can cook a turkey inside those super insulated pogies. I haven't seen many using them here in AK. I would consider a pair if I was riding to Nome though.
  • 12-19-2012
    Derek.Endress
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Valhalla View Post
    I am pretty sure you can cook a turkey inside those super insulated pogies. I haven't seen many using them here in AK. I would consider a pair if I was riding to Nome though.

    Definitely!

    She makes sweet DD pogies and I am more then happy with mine although I just mounted a new Jeff Jones Loop on my BG and the angles have changed how the Dogwoods fit. She said she can make me a set for these bars yet I will see what transpires temp wise with some longer tours :)
  • 12-19-2012
    Valhalla
    Yeah, my pair from 2007 doesnt quite seal up and squeezes my cables a little on my speedway h-bar (they were designed for a standard bar). Her newer versions would allow for my H-bar but the Jones bar is a different beast.
  • 12-19-2012
    db4
    arcteryx
  • 12-20-2012
    damnitman
    Well, if it makes any difference, I grew up in Nome...I started using the RBH NTS shirt a few years ago, and the learning curve is a bit steep...it takes a bit of trial, error and attention to your physical self so you can proactively open or close vents. I also use a mesh/fishnet shirt or two as a base layer...the mesh helps minimize conductive heat loss. I also like Wingnut packs (particularly the Assault and Enduro), they ride lower than other "traditional" packs, more on the sacrum than on the lumbar or thoracic areas of the back...this lets air circulate, keeping me warmer and drier.

    ps-I know nothing about the Gore stuff...sorry