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  1. #1
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    Winter boot reccomendations?

    I've got a set of Garne SPD boots right now and I love being able to ride clipless but the boots are too narrow so my toes go numb pretty quick.

    What I like about the garne's is that they're reasonably light yet well insulated- if the toe box was big enough they'd be perfect.

    So, any recommendations for a reasonably light winter SPD-compatible boot with a wide toebox?

    I've heard much praise for the lake MX302s, but I've also heard they're pretty heavy- I'd prefer lighter and less insulated over heavy.

    I've tried DH/flat pedals and standard boots for winter riding in the past, didn't like them, would prefer not to get suggestions on those. Some folks love them, I get it, but they don't work for me.

  2. #2
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    I have an old friend that has taken a sorel, style pack boot a few sizes too large and removed the bottoms (soles) and wears them over his pair of spd shoes......sort of like a bottomless mukluk......maybe barefoot over-boot with an spd shoe inside, is a better description. Sort of the best of both worlds.
    owner/raconteur at fat-bike.com

  3. #3
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    The Shimano winter boots are great and a bit lighter than the Lakes. I've got both and find that the Lakes are warmer, but the Shimanos fit better and ride better. When temps are mild (20 or warmer, ish) the Shimanos are the shoe of choice, otherwise the Lakes.

  4. #4
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    I have the Shimanos and they are working well for me. I have real problems keeping my feet warm even when the temp is just floating around 0c. The Shimanos work perfect until it gets into -10c or colder just by them selves after that I use a hot foot toe warmer inside and have no more issues.

  5. #5
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    Fyi

    Altrec.com has Keen Summit boots on sale, which many have mentioned as a good, non-clipless option.
    Just saying ...
    Craig, Durango CO
    "Lighten up PAL" ... King Cage

  6. #6
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    How do the thermal cycling shoe covers compare? I put flats on my fatbike for now, but I'd much rather wear my Shimano shoes, the problem is they breath extremely well in the summer, so super cold in the winter. I've put some Pearl Izumi toe covers on them and that is good down to about...40ish, maybe a bit more.

    If it is worthwhile I would rather not drop big money on nice winter cycling shoes and just get the covers...Any worth checking out? Or would I still freeze?

    OP, sorry if this is hijacking, seems to fit the topic.

  7. #7
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    Good to know about the shimanos- I've got their regular MTB shoes and they fit great.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jn35646 View Post
    How do the thermal cycling shoe covers compare? I put flats on my fatbike for now, but I'd much rather wear my Shimano shoes, the problem is they breath extremely well in the summer, so super cold in the winter. I've put some Pearl Izumi toe covers on them and that is good down to about...40ish, maybe a bit more.

    If it is worthwhile I would rather not drop big money on nice winter cycling shoes and just get the covers...Any worth checking out? Or would I still freeze?

    OP, sorry if this is hijacking, seems to fit the topic.
    I used to ride in sidi dominators with wool socks and bread bags- that was good to around 10 degrees F but the shoes would get pretty f'd up by all the salt.

    I've never tried covers but boots are pretty hassle free, which appeals.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckfiddious View Post
    I used to ride in sidi dominators with wool socks and bread bags- that was good to around 10 degrees F but the shoes would get pretty f'd up by all the salt.

    I've never tried covers but boots are pretty hassle free, which appeals.
    I hear you on the hassle free part. I rode in my Goretex Keen's last night with just wool socks in the mid 20's and was fine in the foot department...but I really dislike flats and would rather be riding clipless.

    I might invest in a decent set of cheap flats (Wellgo MG-1) and see how much the improved grip works, but I just don't like my feet bouncing off the pedals at all.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jn35646 View Post
    How do the thermal cycling shoe covers compare? I put flats on my fatbike for now, but I'd much rather wear my Shimano shoes, the problem is they breath extremely well in the summer, so super cold in the winter. I've put some Pearl Izumi toe covers on them and that is good down to about...40ish, maybe a bit more.

    If it is worthwhile I would rather not drop big money on nice winter cycling shoes and just get the covers...Any worth checking out? Or would I still freeze?

    OP, sorry if this is hijacking, seems to fit the topic.
    My experience is that covers may work to keep you warm, but only for a short period of time. As mentioned in another thread, snow biking often involves snow hiking, and I have found that covers don't last very long in those conditions. I have seen Specialized has more heavy duty covers, but I suspect they will last slightly longer, and still collect snow on the inside.
    OTOH, I really like another posters low $ option (I forget who to give the credit to); buy some used XC boots and do a little work to fit your cleats on the bottom of those.
    I'm looking for used XC boots now!
    Craig, Durango CO
    "Lighten up PAL" ... King Cage

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by cbrossman;8942124OTOH
    , I really like another posters low $ option (I forget who to give the credit to); buy some used XC boots and do a little work to fit your cleats on the bottom of those.I'm looking for used XC boots now!
    C'est moi.
    Warm Riding Boots on the Cheap - Really Cheap
    Still working great BTY.
    When I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the future of the human race. ~H.G. Wells

  12. #12
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    I use pearl izumi barrier gtx shoes. they are pretty lightweight. I went two sizes up. they run small and I wanted a little extra room for thick socks. two seasons using them and I'm happy. they're probably not as warm as the Lake boots.

  13. #13
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    Shimano goretex 1 size too big, socks and Baa Baa Merino socks plus sandwich bags if it gets really cold, but I feel the cold in my feet......

  14. #14
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    IMG_0795

    I use the Gore Thermal covers over normal MTB shoes and rode in -19 C and my feet were toasty

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by thesilversurfer View Post
    I use the Gore Thermal covers over normal MTB shoes and rode in -19 C and my feet were toasty
    Everyone's different, and that would not work for me. When it gets to -10C or below, my booties would only keep my feet warm for an hour at best.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


    Shorthills Cycling Club

  16. #16
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    I've been riding on Northwave GTX Celsius Arctics this year and have been very impressed. Last week I did a 1.5 hour ride at -25C air temp with two layers of wool socks and while my toes got chilly I wasn't too uncomfortable. I'd buy them again in a heartbeat. CRC has them for 50% off right now, but the size selection isn't too great.

  17. #17
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    I am ridic.

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  19. #19
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    For megacold—and riding on flats/platforms—I'm using a pair of Keen Brixen Mid boots—bought 'em in a larger size for use with super thick socks. Much lighter boot than they look, IMO:

    Keen Brixen Mid | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    For anything above 25º, I'm diggin' my new Shimano MW81's. Also bought those one size up.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by cutthroat View Post
    C'est moi.
    Warm Riding Boots on the Cheap - Really Cheap
    Still working great BTY.
    NICE!

    as little snow as we've had this year I'm guessing there'd be some cheap ones on craigslist right now.

  21. #21
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    I have the Northwave GTX Celsius Artics and highly recommend them. They are light, comfortable and I find them warm down to around 20 degrees. Colder than that, I add the Gore covers.

  22. #22
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    I wore the spec defrosters for 3 winters, they were definitely waterproof but not very warm. After a half hour I could feel the cold coming through the sole, by the end of the ride my toes were in pain despite adding toe warmers and/or booties. I just bought the pearl izumi's, with only 2 snow rides (not much of a winter here this year) they were toasty warm and dry. For once I completely forgot about my feet and thoroughly enjoyed my ride. Unfortunately they have been bought out and discontinued by shimano, but if you can find a pair check 'em out.

  23. #23
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    I use Shimano MW80's are they are light, warm, and waterproof. I have enough room to wear wool socks with Gator Neoprene fleece lined socks, although not needed. I bought the Gator socks in prep for a fat bike race in the Michigan in February, but I never really needed them, since the shoes and wool socks were enough. The MW81's replace the MW80's.
    - Ed

    2012 Trek Madone 6.7 SSL
    2013 Specialized Tricross Comp Disc
    2011 Trek Top Fuel 9.9 SSL
    2012 Salsa Mukluk 2

  24. #24
    ouch....
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    Question, are those booties/covers waterproof??

    I can step in a stream & as long as it's not over the top of the boot, I stay dry with the lakes. I would take a bit extra weight & make sure my feet are staying warm/dry. 1 mistake I made was settling for a smaller size than I should have had (all the shop had in stock at the time). A bit too snug with good wool socks. If it were 1 or 2 sizes larger I think it would keep my feet warmer longer.
    Riding.....

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monkeyrider1 View Post
    I use pearl izumi barrier gtx shoes. they are pretty lightweight. I went two sizes up. they run small and I wanted a little extra room for thick socks. two seasons using them and I'm happy. they're probably not as warm as the Lake boots.
    I have both the Lake MX-302 and Pearl Izumi Barrier GTX, and I concur for the most part. I, too had to go up two full sizes on the PI shoes to get enough "wiggle room" for my toes/socks. The PI shoes are much, much lighter in weight than the Lake shoes, which is great if you ever do a race in the winter, or a cold cyclocross race. I do like the substantial "boot-like" feel of the Lake shoes in very cold conditions however, and the Vibram outsoles are much better for hiking through snow than the Pearl Izumi's more cycling-specific sole.

    Provided you buy them with plenty of room for thick socks, either of these boots will significantly increase your winter cycling enjoyment.

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