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  1. #1
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    Why Carbon fork?

    I'm by no means a specialized "hater", I've owned them before and have many specialized parts on my Scott Scale 29r. I also have a Pug Ops ordered but I looked over the Salsa and Specialized fatbikes before going with the Pug Ops. Let me get to my question, why a Carbon fork? What's the point? Isn't the main point of a fatbike to go where no bike has gone before? It's it the "heavy hauler" of bikes? I want a bike I can load down with camping gear, ride in 50miles and spend the night in the middle of nowhere. Unless I and everyone else I asked at many local bike shops are wrong, you can't really mount anything on it without seriously degrading the strength of the fork. I wonder why they don't offer a non-carbon fork option.Are they trying to market both models as "racers" only?

    Discuss....

  2. #2
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    Having ridden both carbon/non carbon forked fat bike. lighting the front end changes the feel of the bike.

    Also would like to point out not all bikes are created to be haulers, Ice/Snow racing is big in midwest.

  3. #3
    Dirt Huffer
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    They make it easier to ride a wheelie

  4. #4
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    What dead said. The fatbike sector has splintered into sub-genres. You got your adventure fatbikes, racing fatbikes, hunting fatbikes, death metal fatbikes, punk fatbikes, emo fatbikes, electro-pop fatbikes.....

  5. #5
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    Cabon forks: first, what spec. is doing has nothing to do with my answers below.

    carbon fork advantages:

    1. engineered compliance without the complexity of true-suspension forkage
    2. lighter weight....in some cases significantly less than half the weight of steel or alu.
    3. your tongue will not stick to carbon in the cold.


    PS. Durability issues? ?? Not in my experience with three different brands of carbon fatbike fork. I am 200 pounds dressed to ride. I carry tools and extra clothes. But I haven't mounted anything to the forks...yet.

    PPS. rack mounting options: I can think of 2 very simple (simple to me) methods of mounting a rack on a carbon fork. One method would be to bond mounting lugs to the fork legs. a second method would be to install a rubber-cushioned clamp to the fork legs to accept the rack mounting hardware. Of course, the rack would need to have some articulation in order to allow the carbon fork to move as it likes.

    How much weight are you thinking of placing here?

  6. #6
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    Despite what a lot of the local guys may tell you, having a light(er) weight fat bike is a good thing depending on what you want to do with it. The idea of making your fat bike lighter and getting the "you're doing it wrong" is just an opinion. For what you want to do, it weight isn't going to be a factor. The reason I come here to discuss things on this forum is if I wanted to talk about certain things pertaining to fat biking, I would be told "fat biking isn't about that". Some have set opinions and ideas of what fat biking is all about, and I like to use mine in a variety of ways.

    Lightweight parts are good for some and not needed to others. So it's not to "racers only" it's to people that don't want to haul gear into the woods and camp and have no need for braze ons or racks. I have a Necro and have never bolted anything on or used extra broze ons, never had a frame bag and only rarely use the bottle cage. I wanted a fat bike with tires to ride off road and in snow. It just so happened to have the extra braze ons. And I like black.

  7. #7
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    Raul said it!!

    Do what you want with your bike.

    I do what I like with it. My way is not wrong.....unless I try to ride a carbon road bike on a snowy trail with 10 inches of powder...that ain't gonna work unless "biking" to me is pushing a bike in the snow. Is that wrong? Yes.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Armyballer View Post
    I want a bike I can load down with camping gear, ride in 50miles and spend the night in the middle of nowhere. Unless I and everyone else I asked at many local bike shops are wrong, you can't really mount anything on it without seriously degrading the strength of the fork.
    Sounds like you got the right fatbike. My Pugsley has seen a ton of abuse and is going strong 5yrs later. I never have to think twice about it or baby it when transporting or riding it. Putting a carbon fork on it has never seemed like a good idea to me.

    Having said that you don't need to haul a ton of stuff to tour with a fatbike and you don't need front or rear racks. I wouldn't pick a carbon forked or framed bike as a touring rig, but there isn't any show stopping reason you can't tour with one.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  9. #9
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    I have the Carver, love it.
    I never considered putting my steel Pugsley fork back on once I went to Carbon.
    Now at 32Lb and It has really helped on the steep climbs I have around here.
    I have no intention of bikepacking in winter, so it's just right for me.

    I have a 47mm wide 900g wheel for the summer and an 80mm wheel for the winter to further make it as useful as possible in each environment

  10. #10
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    Peep Peep!!!

    Carbon-forked fat-bikepacker coming through!!!!



    P1040183 by ScotRoutes, on Flickr

  11. #11
    Fat & Single
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    Cant notice tapered fork, cant notice 15mm thru, cant notice carbon frames, cant notice 31.6mm bars, cant notice blah blah blah..... can notice steel frames and carbon wheels.... frame for dampening and wheels for zero flex.
    Ti O'Beast
    Indy Fab
    One9
    Dirty Disco CX

  12. #12
    Human Test Subject
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    carbon breaks all the time and you shouldn't get it. also it's 1990. curt cobain 4 prez.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by E6roller View Post
    PS. Durability issues? ?? Not in my experience with three different brands of carbon fatbike fork. I am 200 pounds dressed to ride. I carry tools and extra clothes. But I haven't mounted anything to the forks...yet.
    I'm 135 pounds and damaged one (soft spot) within 3 weeks of purchase going down 2 winters ago on ice under snow, but I seem to be the exception. I switched to steel and don't see enough difference to try another carbon fork.

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