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  1. #1
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    What tire psi are you guys running for hardpack trails??? Do I need to go tubeless???

    Just curious what you guys are running psi wise for hardpack trails? Also did you convert to tubeless if so how do you like it????

  2. #2
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    6-9 psi on Escalators. No tubeless, but thinking about it. Been getting a lot of flats lately.

  3. #3
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    6-7 psi on 27 tip Nates. Tubeless is great, no issues. Can run down at 2-3 in the deep snow and 6-7 on hard pack.

  4. #4
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    I've been around 7 front, 8-8.5 rear; tubeless Floaters. Still experimenting...

  5. #5
    Laramie, Wyoming
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    Tubeless is easy and very worthwhile for winter riding with extremely low pressures and it helps in preventing small puncture flats as with thorns.

  6. #6
    Nemophilist
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    DISCLAIMER: I've never had tubeless bike anything;

    To me, the only substantive reason to go tubeless is if you live in an area with a lot of thorns, goat heads, or other nasties. Makes a lot of sense then, and in fact may rank as a necessity. You may also save some weight, if that is important to you. FOR ME, I still question the ultimate reliability of tubeless, and frankly I am too lazy to mess with it. If we were talking a low volume tire - which for me is pretty much any normal 26er - then tubeless would be the only way for me to run at lower pressures to optimize ride, grip, etc. The bigger the wheel/tire, the less it matters. I could very easily flat 2-3 times per ride on my 26er running as much as 50psi to try and protect the tube/rim. I got to the point that if I thumped the rim, I just stopped and prepared for a tube change, as a snake bite was a virtual certainty. Tubeless likely would have made some sense there, except for the potential of burping pressure all the time. I think I've had maybe 5 flats or less on my Niner in 3 years. I've experienced a total of ONE Fatflat.

    I know a lot of people like to have a baseline for where to set pressures. That's fine, but you will still need to learn how to interpret what is going on in practice at that time under those conditions to really get it optimized. It's a game of flotation/traction -vs- rolling resistance -vs- tube/rim protection. I've found that getting the pressure so that I just avoid thumping the rims is usually the right place to be for the proper balance. From there, and depending on conditions, I may sense that rolling resistance is too high, and so add some air to ease my burden. There is a bit of leeway beyond that until you start to sense that the ride is getting rough or bouncy.

    This winter, a friend with a gauge measured my settings. I had no clue, other than it was working well for the amount of snow and on the trails we were riding. My gauge is how it works and feels. I was surprised to learn that I was at about 9 rear and 6 front; far lower than I expected given my 240lbs. I'm sure that I am at least 3-4 pounds higher now that the snow is gone and I'm able to ride more aggressively.

    Of course, that is using my gauge, so I cant really give you a number.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  7. #7
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    I run 8/9 (front/back) on husker du's (tubeless) it's quite hilly here and if my rear is under 8 climbing is noticeably harder (dragging a 1.6kg brick - alfine8 hub on back can be tedious sometimes) tubeless is great, feel more connected to the surface.
    Could run a little lower (7/8) but anything less than that and the hudu's can get a bit funny on corners.

  8. #8
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
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    I weigh about 180 geared to go, currently Escalator rear, Bud front.

    Singletrack non snow, I tend to run about 8 rear, 6 front, and tubeless, love it.

    Snow, down into the 2 to 4 range, depending on conditions.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  9. #9
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    For ST riding 7-10psi range for both. no desire for tubeless.

  10. #10
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    I ride with Bud & Lou or BFL's on Clownshoes. Quite often I'll go out with a freshly installed tire, so it will have anywhere from 10 to 20 psi when I start. I air down until it feels right. On snow, slickrock, sand, packed dirt, and medium packed coarse sand, I always end up at 5 to 6 psi. I check my psi's with a Topeak digital, and like TrailMaker stated, so far I have no desire to try tubeless. My riding weight is around 230#.

    The nice thing about these big fat Surly tubes is that you have lots of room for patches. Fourteen patches and lots of room left. All the holes, except for one snake bite were from one cholla encounter.


  11. #11
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    Depends on the tire.
    BFL(120tpi)on hard pack runs about 5psi.
    Endos(27tpi)run on 8-9psi.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by crashtestdummy View Post
    I air down until it feels right.
    This... it's all about feel. I let air out until I find the the sweet spot for given conditions, rolling resistance, and bump sensitivity. If pressure is too high, the tires get bouncy when the going gets rough and traction suffers. If pressure is too low, the rolling resistance will hold you back on hardpack. I don't think there's a magical number, and I don't bother to use a gauge, but generally, your tires should give quite a bit when you squeeze them.

  13. #13
    Laramie, Wyoming
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    Quote Originally Posted by crashtestdummy View Post
    That's a Perfect sales pitch for tubeless.

  14. #14
    mighty sailin' man
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    Quote Originally Posted by alphazz View Post
    That's a Perfect sales pitch for tubeless.
    Swapping tires is a pitch for tubes

    Might be time to try sealant in those tubes
    Quote Originally Posted by davidarnott
    wheelies, beyond being the best way over any sort of obstacle, both above or below, are are the steedliest expresstion of joy

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by alphazz View Post
    That's a Perfect sales pitch for tubeless.
    negative...... tubeless = hawt mess.

  16. #16
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    8 on the rear but on the front I adjust till self steer goes away. usually about 7.5 on BFL and 7.9 on a regular Larry.

    250 lb clyde.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by alphazz View Post
    That's a Perfect sales pitch for tubeless.
    I like to swap back and forth between BFL's and Bud/Lou, so I'm currently not interested. Like I said all but 2 of the patches were from a single encounter with a cholla. I don't normally ride around cholla's.

    There's too many posts on here saying that tubeless isn't worth the effort, and I'm quite lazy.

  18. #18
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    Nate front 8psi, Knard rear 10psi. Q-Tubes ExtraLights. Plan to go tubeless soon.

  19. #19
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    What tire psi are you guys running for hardpack trails??? Do I need to go tubel

    I'm 200lbs kitted up and running 8/9 psi f/r in my 120tpi HuDu's on hardpack. Performance is fantastic.

    I've been catching tons of thorns with them due to all the winter deadfall on my local trails. I'm tempted to go tubeless but I'm hesitant due to the "arts and crafts" nature of most conversions I've seen. If I continue to get so many flats in the coming months I will likely get out the tape and Stans, but I'm hoping things will get better as the trails are cleared.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by alphazz View Post
    That's a Perfect sales pitch for tubeless.
    Those patches must weight you down

    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisInYpsi View Post
    I've been catching tons of thorns with them due to all the winter deadfall on my local trails. I'm tempted to go tubeless but I'm hesitant due to the "arts and crafts" nature of most conversions I've seen. If I continue to get so many flats in the coming months I will likely get out the tape and Stans, but I'm hoping things will get better as the trails are cleared.
    I had never run tubeless anything and managed it pretty easily. Was great until I ripped my rear tire on a dirty ass rock/oyster yesterday. Could have put a tube in to get home but had forgot to put the spanner in to remove wheel.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeG View Post
    I've been around 7 front, 8-8.5 rear; tubeless Floaters. Still experimenting...
    Same here, works great so far...

  22. #22
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    6psi front, 7.5psi rear, Bud and Lou tubeless, 190ish lbs w/ gear.

  23. #23
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    this thread reminds me of the guy who pumped up his Larry on LM up to 80psi until the tire bead finally burst the LM rim.. LMAO!

    edit: found it..

    What tire psi are you guys running for hardpack trails??? Do I need to go tubeless???-68320_10151242627921464_788155826_n.jpg

  24. #24
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    Apparently I run higher than many of us. On hard pack I may start at 12 to 15 psi then lower it on the ride until I hit that sweet spot of fast rolling yet smooth over bumps. I still end up around 9-12 most rides.
    laotzucycles.blogspot.com

  25. #25
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    I run Husker Du's in the 16-18 range. After seeing what the rest of the world is running...I might need to try lower.

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