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  1. #1
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    wandering front wheel

    sorry, noob question,

    at slow speeds under power my moonie's front wheel "wanders"
    all over. particularly bothersome when climbing
    i try to shift weight, pedal circles etc but it's really annoying.
    is this just inherent to the bike , from bad technique, or would riser handle bar help?

    dave
    spez roubaix
    fantom cross
    crux
    moonlander

  2. #2
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    clown shoe? What tire, what psi?

  3. #3
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Re: wandering front wheel

    Quote Originally Posted by Johanneson View Post
    clown shoe? What tire, what psi?
    What terrain?
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  4. #4
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    Too much pression, air down a little.

  5. #5
    mighty sailin' man
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    Quote Originally Posted by new8812 View Post
    Too much pression, air down a little.
    or too little
    Quote Originally Posted by davidarnott
    wheelies, beyond being the best way over any sort of obstacle, both above or below, are are the steedliest expresstion of joy

  6. #6
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    Sounds like self steer at low pressure and/or too narrow handle bars.

  7. #7
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    Tire pressure front and rear bias.

    Make sure your front has a bit more air in it, than the back tire. This will:
    1. Throw the center of gravity aft,
    2. lessen the footprint grip on the front.

    The opposite will make the front tire grab the trail surface when it goes of camber opposed to level.

  8. #8
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    riding a fat tire bike is different.... folks call it self steer, and in my experience I have found some tires appear to be prone more than others.. however,,, it is a much bigger contact patch than you might be used to. slight inputs that are easily corrected on a 2.3 tire, tends to have a more profound effect, start with playing around with air pressure, if you have wider bars toss them on ,, but get 3-4 rides on it.. it takes a bit of getting used to.

  9. #9
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    I'm sure this is evident but make sure there aren't any big hops or wobbles in your front tire

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by twright205 View Post
    riding a fat tire bike is different.... folks call it self steer, and in my experience I have found some tires appear to be prone more than others.. however,,, it is a much bigger contact patch than you might be used to. slight inputs that are easily corrected on a 2.3 tire, tends to have a more profound effect, start with playing around with air pressure, if you have wider bars toss them on ,, but get 3-4 rides on it.. it takes a bit of getting used to.
    ^^^
    This!

  11. #11
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by twright205 View Post
    riding a fat tire bike is different.... folks call it self steer, and in my experience I have found some tires appear to be prone more than others.. however,,, it is a much bigger contact patch than you might be used to. slight inputs that are easily corrected on a 2.3 tire, tends to have a more profound effect, start with playing around with air pressure, if you have wider bars toss them on ,, but get 3-4 rides on it.. it takes a bit of getting used to.
    And interestingly, I never feel it on any kind of slippery, icy or snowy surface, only on hard surfaces in non-winter conditions. It is very noticeable though on those hard dry surfaces, the slightest amount of leaning in one direction at lower pressures creates a pretty dramatic tendency for the bike to head in that direction, so often in gentle turns you end up applying opposite pressure. It seems like the more people ride fatbikes in dry conditions at low pressure, the more this becomes an issue. As said above, you get used to it and after a while it's barely noticeable, if at all.

    One of the cool things about a fatbike is how dramatically different they ride in different conditions.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by twright205 View Post
    riding a fat tire bike is different.... folks call it self steer, and in my experience I have found some tires appear to be prone more than others.. however,,, it is a much bigger contact patch than you might be used to. slight inputs that are easily corrected on a 2.3 tire, tends to have a more profound effect, start with playing around with air pressure, if you have wider bars toss them on ,, but get 3-4 rides on it.. it takes a bit of getting used to.
    Well said, couldn't agree more. It definitely takes some time to get used to it.

  13. #13
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    oops
    moonlander, non offset front end, clownshoes, bud/lou's

    i haven't kept a record how different tire pressures handle.i run pretty low pressures being 160 pounds and with tough trail conditions.

    i do know the steeper the trail and harder i pedal, the more self steer i get. our trails can be like ski trails, single track winding up and down fairly steep terrain, sometimes very steep and unrideable with any snow.

    when i am cranking at my limit climbing a steep turn i can barely keep the front end going where i want it to.

    on flats my weight is pretty forward with salso moto handlebars. not very comfortable on flats but helps keep my front end down on steep trails. i am not sure wider bars will fit between some of the trees.

    i do accept that some of this might be technique/weight shifting, but not all.

    also,does this occur on other bikes?

    dave
    spez roubaix
    fantom cross
    crux
    moonlander

  14. #14
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    Like you said;

    Noob question.

    It can be one way to suss out your correct tire pressure for conditions, but basically... you'll get used to it.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  15. #15
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    wandering front wheel

    Sounds like you need to experiment with air pressure to me. As hard as it may be to believe I can generally tell the difference of as little as 1/2 pound especially at lower pressures in the front. At too low pressure up front you will tend to get self steer and I also notice the front end being less responsive, more prone to wander, etc. Add in 1/2-1 pound and the front end is lighter feeling, more responsive, no self steer. Try adding a bit of pressure and figure out the minimum pressure that you can run without experiencing the issues that you are.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  16. #16
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    As i said, even if i look like a clown, too much pression=not enought traction on front so your tire move around on the ground (following the ground and your input, as not enought traction to stay put), It is not self steering where the bike follow the tire which deform . Air down a bit. ;o)

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