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  1. #201
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZENMIND View Post
    So I picked up a pair of these this week from my LBS and only have a few rides on them in 3 inches of fresh snow (been below freezing). I've got them on Marge Lights (65mm) and they have a nice profile on them. I'm happy with the rear, it holds nicely and has good grip while climbing. I'm not sold on the front yet. It is better than the Larry or BFL I was running in the front, but it still washes out more than I would like. I'm wondering if an unstudded Dillinger would provide any more off-camber grip up front. The Snowshoe just doesn't have much of a side lug...even on the 65mm rims, the casing sticks out past the lugs a bit. Anyone have experience with how one of these compares to a Husker or Dillinger (unstudded) up front? I'm not ready to ditch it up front yet (too new) but I'm not sold on it as a good front yet either. I'll see if I can post a pic...
    How much pressure are you running, using inner tubes?

  2. #202
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    Very interested on hearing more reviews on these. I was leaning towards a Nate/Bud combo but I can definitely be swayed!!

  3. #203
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    Go for the Bud in the front, the snowshoe and Nate won't be as good.

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    I'm running tubes. Based on what I read on this thread, I'm running them a little higher than I had been running my Surly BFL. I'm not sure that my gauge is accurate this low, but I aired it up to about 12-13, and then backed off on the trail until it felt right. It probably has around 9-11 in it...I typically ran my BFL at 7-8 (also with a tube). I'm open to suggestions as to what to change to improve the bite but I'm also considering tires with more of a side lug.
    I'm in central Pennsylvania where the temps vary a lot in the winter between below freezing (1degree currently) and then 50degree days so plenty of snow, feeze-thaw, mud, etc. I like the weight of these Snowshoes and the 45NRTH Dillinger (studdless) is similar weight with a bigger side lug but I'd hate to get the Dillinger and still feel my front washing out. But then there is always the nuclear option...the BUD. This would give me all the traction that a fatbike could have up front...here is a pic of my friends Bud on a Rolling D.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Vee-Rubber Snowshoe 4.7 weight-image.jpg  


  5. #205
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    Quote Originally Posted by wetpaint View Post
    I just took the tire off last night and put Dillingers on for a race coming up and I didnt measure it before, however I would guess that it is a hair shorter than (1/4"?) than my Dillingers. The Bud is a tall tire and the Snowshoe is definitely not an intermediate or even 4.7" tire. They should have labeled it 3.8"

    As far as snow performance, I did get a change to test it out in some really, really soft conditions. The tire seated on the bead much easier than Surly or 45Nrth tires, the rubber compound is also stiffer but stickier. Snow really packs on the tire. As you can see here, my bud it fine, but the rear tire has snow covering the whole tread, it doesn't seem to affect performance, but it's annoying none the less


    For soft snow conditions, I was really impressed with the tire, it does nearly as well as a Nate with lower tread height. I didn't find myself missing the Nate in conditions I rode in. It also stuck really well when riding on a slanted surface, my dillingers have a tendency to slide out if riding on a sidehill, but the Snowshoe stuck just like a Nate.

    Overall, I'm quite impressed with the tire, it does really well in soft snow. I may try putting some Armorall on the tire to keep the snow from packing, but I'll probably keep running this tire over the Nate.
    Quote Originally Posted by spruceboy View Post
    I have a fatback sterling tire on the rear now for two weeks. I have been mostly pretty happy with it. It is 4.2" (or there abouts) mounted up on my 90mm UMAs. It does appear to have one downside - it appears to "pack up" with snow a bit.

    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/Od0PDCm4KKy3c_OSzTyFUNMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=e mbedwebsite"><img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-q9y6jmCYMaM/UpZMHwRYKbI/AAAAAAAANVs/Jn7Ql5D5pAA/s800/IMG_0010.JPG" height="800" width="600" /></a>

    compared to a bud, taken as the same time:

    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/RBOwQbdgcg3zGLYI3vKaYNMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=e mbedwebsite"><img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-MGxjjjnujp4/UpZMIua_b2I/AAAAAAAANV4/Z7xi1owP64s/s800/IMG_0012.JPG" height="800" width="600" /></a>

    This might be a one-off thing, however snow seems to stick to it much more than the Husker Dus or Buds do.

    Otherwise I am pretty happy with it, though I wish it as wide as a BFL. Rolls a bit slower on snow than the Husker Du does, but it could just be in my head. I have been running it tubeless, and it has been burp free for me, even at very lower pressures. YMMV of course.
    So, I'm committed as I've already purchased my Snowshoes (was also looking at the Sterlings but found a good price on the Snowshoes so pulled the pin on them instead), but I'm curious as to how many other folks may be experiencing the snow sticking to the tread as seen above... I'm sure it's dependent on the type of snow, however, is this a common occurrence? It's no doubt related to the silica tread compound...
    Last edited by slabber; 01-06-2014 at 10:05 PM.

  6. #206
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZENMIND View Post
    I'm running tubes. Based on what I read on this thread, I'm running them a little higher than I had been running my Surly BFL. I'm not sure that my gauge is accurate this low, but I aired it up to about 12-13, and then backed off on the trail until it felt right. It probably has around 9-11 in it...I typically ran my BFL at 7-8 (also with a tube). I'm open to suggestions as to what to change to improve the bite but I'm also considering tires with more of a side lug.
    I'm in central Pennsylvania where the temps vary a lot in the winter between below freezing (1degree currently) and then 50degree days so plenty of snow, feeze-thaw, mud, etc. I like the weight of these Snowshoes and the 45NRTH Dillinger (studdless) is similar weight with a bigger side lug but I'd hate to get the Dillinger and still feel my front washing out. But then there is always the nuclear option...the BUD. This would give me all the traction that a fatbike could have up front...here is a pic of my friends Bud on a Rolling D.
    My wife runs the Bud up front on a Marge Lite in a Carver fork... works great. Husker Du on the rear. Both at 3psi or less (125lb rider). When I've ridden her bike (I'm 150lbs), I'm still at less than 5 psi, usually 3-4 psi. It definitely gets more tread on the trail when the tire flattens out.

    I'd venture to say you can still run less pressure - keep experimenting with lower tire pressures until you feel it starting to fold over in the turns, then add enough to keep it from folding over. Similar to sorting out pressures for cyclocross.

  7. #207
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    Thanks Slabber. I'll continue to play with PSI. As for your question about snowpack, my Snowshoes were holding more snow than my friend's Bud in 20degree weather. Not so much as to prevent traction in back and I didn't notice any decrease in traction but visibly noticeable. When riding in 30 degree weather, there were no issues with the snow packing.

  8. #208
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    Regarding the snow sticking to the rear tires: couldn't it just be that you have a lot more weight on the rear wheel so you are pressing the snow into the tread with a lot more force? Could it be something to do with the fact that the tires are relatively new?

    To find out for sure if this is an issue we should look at bikes that have the Snowshoe on the front and rear both, or just the front with another tire on the rear and compare packing up then.

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  9. #209
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    I weighed 4 Snowshoe tires at the shop yesterday before I picked mine out. The weight ranged from 1226 grams to 1284 grams.

    After 12 hours at around 30 psi, I measured my new Snowshoe vs my older Escalator. Both were at full pressure (15-17psi), using tubes on Rolling Daryll rims.

    Snowshoe measured 103mm wide and 80mm tall
    Escalator measured 97mm wide and 73mm tall.

    Not as big as I had hoped, but bigger than the Husker Du tire they are replacing on the rear of my bike, and at almost the exact same weight. With the stickier rubber and the more aggressive tread pattern, I figure its a worthwhile upgrade.

    EDIT: These are all casing measurements. The tread adds a few mm to the height.
    Last edited by FishMan473; 01-08-2014 at 10:15 AM.
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  10. #210
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    Snow packs on both front and rear, I am running a pair of sterlings which is very similar.

  11. #211
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    Its interesting that snow tires are designed to shed snow off the tread, and keep the rubber clear. But these...with knobs soooo far apart are holding onto the snow.

    I don't know that my nates or bud has ever done that....EVAR!!

  12. #212
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    What makes anyone think that some snow on the tires decreases traction? Is everyone a tribologist now?
    I think some of you look for things that are wrong with something, when that something wrong just doesn't exist.

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  13. #213
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    Snow packed in tires is just like mud packed in tires. Can't clear the mud from the tread, you ain't gonna get any traction. Gotta clear the tread.....clear the tread!

  14. #214
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    Re: Vee-Rubber Snowshoe 4.7 weight

    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    Snow packed in tires is just like mud packed in tires. Can't clear the mud from the tread, you ain't gonna get any traction. Gotta clear the tread.....clear the tread!
    Depending on the moisture content of the snow, snow on snow seems to provide traction more so than mud on mud. Having been into jeeps years ago I learned this valuable lesson.

    The way snow falls off/displaces /scrapes off of a tire during it's revolution is much different than mud also.
    Unless people have had their snowshoes turn into a complete slippery snow slick, I'm not buying any issue.
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  15. #215
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    Re: Vee-Rubber Snowshoe 4.7 weight

    Quote Originally Posted by Dar85en View Post
    Now all we need is some real life measurements.
    Seen a few measures on the fatbike facebook pages. Mine are 4 inches on uma 90s. Height not measured. Don't care.

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  16. #216
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    Snow packed in tires is just like mud packed in tires. Can't clear the mud from the tread, you ain't gonna get any traction. Gotta clear the tread.....clear the tread!
    I haven't ridden my Snowshoe tire above 15 degrees F, but so far the snow packing hasn't affected traction, it's just been annoying me that it does that.

  17. #217
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    I'm not saying I am loosing traction due to snowmaking on my tires. I just find it annoying when it's time to put it in the car after a ride or in the house, that's all.

  18. #218
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    Re: Vee-Rubber Snowshoe 4.7 weight

    Quote Originally Posted by manfromwillow View Post
    I'm not saying I am loosing traction due to snowmaking on my tires. I just find it annoying when it's time to put it in the car after a ride or in the house, that's all.
    The melting snow is ok in my car. It's the damn slush and road salt residue after transporting the bike. What a mess.

    And looking back at the pics of snow covered snowshoes... Wtf! That's a lot. I guess these certainty are sticky tires!
    No such snow collection on mine for now.
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  19. #219
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    I've had equal snow pack in both the front and the rear...never had that with my Nate. That said, I did NOT notice any decrease in traction with the snow pack (unlike what you get with mud). I'll be paying attention to this as I put more miles on the rear. I'm swapping out the front for a Bud. I want maximum traction up front with as little washing out as possible...the Snowshoe isn't giving me that. I emailed Vee recently to ask about a studded version of the tire and they responded that the studded version should be out in about a month! Here in central Pennsylvania, temps are constantly heating up above freezing causing melt and then dipping below freezing causing ice. Studs would be a nice option!

  20. #220
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    Any comparisons with Nate on rear? Also I would think the snow buildup can only be a negative attribute (or hopefully neutral at best).

  21. #221
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    I put some Armorall on my Snowshoe to see if it would help with the snowpack issue, it didn't help.

    Durkind - The tire works really well in soft snow, enough that I don't miss the traction from the Nate, however, if you bring your bike in the house or car when done riding the snowpack issue will be really annoying.

  22. #222
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    Vee-Rubber Snowshoe 4.7 weight

    I would think it would also cause issues with traction when moving from snow to ice covered surfaces. Also I wonder how much it increases rotating weight?

    Seems like a really odd problem. Why don't cars with similar rubber have the same problem?


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  23. #223
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    It's more an issue of the tread pattern than the rubber composition. I've been running Origin-8 Devast8ers on the Crawler I've been testing (also made by Vee) and they behave similarly, packing snow, but it doesn't seem to affect overall traction.
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  24. #224
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    It's more an issue of the tread pattern than the rubber composition. I've been running Origin-8 Devast8ers on the Crawler I've been testing (also made by Vee) and they behave similarly, packing snow, but it doesn't seem to affect overall traction.
    The Snowshoe and Stirling are a silica compound, but the Origin8, OnOne and Vee tires are not.

    I've been testing the Floater and have not had it pack much; but then it's been quite cold here in Wisco.

    I put a new Snowshoe on a Clownshoe rim last night, and it measures almost exactly the same size as a BFL on that rim. It actually measures substantially narrower at the tread block than the OnOne Floater, though the casing is a bit wider.

    Will come back in a couple of days with a ride report.

  25. #225
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    I've just heard that the Snowshoes are sold out.
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  26. #226
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    I've just heard that the Snowshoes are sold out.
    Not everywhere. ;p

  27. #227
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    Quote Originally Posted by JordyB View Post
    Not everywhere. ;p
    They are at the main distributors! (although my lbs just got 10 in today)
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  28. #228
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    Vee-Rubber Snowshoe 4.7 weight

    More snow packed into my Escalator than my Snowshoe. I'm thinking this is a non issue.


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  29. #229
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    Looks like and the end of the ride you rolled through some slush with both tires, and then only the front rolled through powder that stuck to the tire. Two different types of frozen moisture on your tires leads me to that conclusion.

  30. #230
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    I just rolled up to where my truck was parked and put the bike in the truck. This is what it looked like afterwards. Just as anecdotal as what other people are reporting.

    FWIW, I was checking out the tire throughout the ride, never any buildup at 20F (snow was probably colder). Even while out on the trail the Escalator had a tiny more snow on it, not enough to even notice under normal circumstances.
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  31. #231
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    I just rolled up to where my truck was parked and put the bike in the truck. This is what it looked like afterwards.
    F'n nailed it!!

    jonshonda....snow detective.

  32. #232
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    Vee-Rubber Snowshoe 4.7 weight

    I bet you can get your own show on TBS with that pitch.


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  33. #233
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    So - why is this being called a 4.7" tire, exactly?

  34. #234
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qyota View Post
    So - why is this being called a 4.7" tire, exactly?
    They measured after the tire was packed with snow?

  35. #235
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    Re: Vee-Rubber Snowshoe 4.7 weight

    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    They measured after the tire was packed with snow?
    Must be! Even on a 90mm rim, I'm surprised mine are 4 inches only.

    Actually I'm glad. They are working well. Very nice tires. And damn light.

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  36. #236
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    Vee-Rubber Snowshoe 4.7 weight-puffin_snowshoe.jpg
    Once the internal pressure of the tires equalizes with the outside temp, snow no longer collects on the Snowshoes. It is no better or worse than the Surly tire I'm running on the rear (both tubeless).

    I am very happy with the Snowshoe as a front tire. While it might not be a true 4.7-inch tire, it is definitely a 4+ inch tire, and I'm fine with that.
    Last edited by mgersib; 01-10-2014 at 12:19 PM. Reason: Add image...

  37. #237
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    Snow packing isn't about internal temp equalizing, this is after 3.5 hours outside.

  38. #238
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    Quote Originally Posted by Espen W View Post
    Self steer is virtually non-existent with Snowshoe. Huge improvement over previous Vee offerings.
    I can't compare against other Vee tires as I haven't tried any others, but will have to respectfully disagree about the lack of self steer... I'm sure it's pressure dependent but at 4 psi tubeless, these tires can definitely hook up and pull to the side, especially when the surface is crowned, eg sloped pavement. It's more noticeable than a Bud at similar pressure but not so bad that I'll take it off the front of my bike. I think it's due in part to the tread pattern, but also the soft rubber compound, both of which I think are otherwise very good.

    Overall, I had a great first ride on the tires - warmer temps today so granular snow, traction was excellent. Started at 5psi, dropped to 4, can probably run closer to 3psi without issue on Marge Lites (weigh about 150lbs).

  39. #239
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    Vee-Rubber Snowshoe 4.7 weight

    Quote Originally Posted by slabber View Post
    I can't compare against other Vee tires as I haven't tried any others, but will have to respectfully disagree about the lack of self steer... I'm sure it's pressure dependent but at 4 psi tubeless, these tires can definitely hook up and pull to the side, especially when the surface is crowned, eg sloped pavement. It's more noticeable than a Bud at similar pressure but not so bad that I'll take it off the front of my bike. I think it's due in part to the tread pattern, but also the soft rubber compound, both of which I think are otherwise very good.

    Overall, I had a great first ride on the tires - warmer temps today so granular snow, traction was excellent. Started at 5psi, dropped to 4, can probably run closer to 3psi without issue on Marge Lites (weigh about 150lbs).
    It should be noted that many riders report that Vee tires work better at higher pressures than Surly tires, and that self-steer is also reduced at higher pressure with most fat tires.
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  40. #240
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    It should be noted that many riders report that Vee tires work better at higher pressures than Surly tires, and that self-steer is also reduced at higher pressure with most fat tires.
    This has been my experience.
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  41. #241
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    What do you mean by "work better at higher pressures"? Do they have similar traction/float at higher pressures than the Surly tires? Or do they just not work as well at lower pressures?
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  42. #242
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    Leaving the myth of "Float" aside, they perform better with a slightly higher pressure. If you run 8 psi with a surly tire, you might want to run 10-11 on a VEE tire.
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  43. #243
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    Leaving the myth of "Float" aside.
    Don't let buttfacker muck up the term float. It is real, and after riding on 9" of snow on yet-to-be-setup groomed trails, I can tell you that I needed all the width I could get.

  44. #244
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    I prefer running at the lower tire pressures, better handling and traction IMHO.

    Consistently running less than 5psi (on snow), usually 3-4psi. Wife gets down to 2.5psi with Bud up front...

    I found the snowshoe was more bouncy until I dropped the pressure, but it was likely related more to the hardpack conditions than the tire itself.

  45. #245
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    But that was the old Snowshoe.
    There's a bettererer one coming
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  47. #247
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    Some more observations now that I've got some more mileage on my rear snowshoe.

    Snow tends to stick a bit less in the 20s, I did one ride where the temp ranged from 32-35 and had no issues with snow sticking

    The tire works well around 3.5-4.5psi in soft snow, once I went above 5psi, the handling in soft snow went out the window and the tire slides all over the place. For hardpack though, it rolls considerably faster above 5psi.

  48. #248
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    I had problems with snow sticking....to everything except the Snowshoe.
    Vee-Rubber Snowshoe 4.7 weight-1535416_10201323594275981_756631816_n-1-.jpg

  49. #249
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    That looks like high velocity spray from front tire.. Wax and silicone
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  50. #250
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    Quote Originally Posted by the mayor View Post
    But that was the old Snowshoe.
    There's a bettererer one coming
    New Tire Preview ? Vee Tire Snowshoe XL | FAT-BIKE.COM
    Anyone else amused that this new XL is MSRP $150 while the regular one can be found for $90-some?

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