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  1. #1
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    Tyre pressure 'tuning'

    Hi all. I've just got my fatty delivered and am ready to take an initial break in ride and am curious about setting tyre pressure. I've taken it around the block last night with about 10psi front and rear and am noticing some bounce. I weigh about 195 with kit. Do I need to drop or raise pressure to remove the bounce??

  2. #2
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    I use 8psi as my baseline and adjust either up or down depending on where I'm riding - if I can be bothered to adjust, that is.

    About 10lbs lighter than you.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  3. #3
    dvn
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    I weigh around 200 and have been running 8 front and 10 rear on fairly smooth single track. I'll go up 2 psi if it's more rocky or rooty. I don't think you will ever eliminate all bounce on a fat bike. Embrace it!

  4. #4
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    I use bfl tyres and run about 9 psi rear and 7 psi front (always) whatever conditions just feels so right and love the floaty feel

  5. #5
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    Ok, thanks very much for your help guys. I've dropped a little more off and am going on a relatively easy riverside ride tomorrow. I can only guesstimate my pressure below 10 psi with my track pump. Can any one sugges how to manage pressures below that? Separate pressure gauge of another pump?

  6. #6
    mighty sailin' man
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    go by feel. You already said you didn't like the bounce on the street. When that happens air up.

    need more cush or float, air down. No numbers needed, just ride
    Quote Originally Posted by davidarnott
    wheelies, beyond being the best way over any sort of obstacle, both above or below, are are the steedliest expresstion of joy

  7. #7
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    I have my BFL'S at around 5F and 6R for rocky power line ridding. Up to ten for flat roads and trails.

  8. #8
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    I am hoping you will hear, from the varied responses, that there is no "right" pressure.

    Generally, the rear pressure will be higher since it carries more of the bike/rider weight.

    Also.....pressure depends on your rim width, tire model, tubeless or tubed, terrain, bike geometry/weight-bias. The variations are endless.

    Start a ride at the higher range, say, 9 psi Rear, 8.5 front, and then drop from there.

    You have to start somewhere, so it's okay to use a number.

    AFter that, you will vary the pressure by squeezing the tire with your hand and will, eventually, correllate that with ride feel.

    Your preferences for tire pressure will be different from mine.

    .....some day we will have automatic pressure changing (I'll go start a rumor about this new invention now)

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