Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 143
  1. #26
    Fat & Single
    Reputation: ozzybmx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    3,991
    Theres someone who trolls the FatBike forum and neg reps people.... ive had a couple and whoever it is they seem to have issues with themselves, my last was along the lines of "Boasting again".... yeah whatever, im sharing my experience and taking pics to hopefully help someone else out. I reckon the negger is actually a fatbike rider too as theres a lot here recieving sneaky negs.
    He has a piddly rep score so dont worry, i'll make it up tomorrow when the 24h curfew runs out
    Ti O'Beast
    Indy Fab
    One9
    Dirty Disco CX

  2. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ze_Zaskar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    658
    I'm I the only one who still prefers tubes?

  3. #28
    Fat & Single
    Reputation: ozzybmx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    3,991
    Quote Originally Posted by Ze_Zaskar View Post
    I'm I the only one who still prefers tubes?
    I don't mind the tubes in my fatbike but would prefer Tubeless, but I'm not splitting tubes to do it. I'm going to have a good go at doing it with tape in the next week or two.
    Ti O'Beast
    Indy Fab
    One9
    Dirty Disco CX

  4. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ze_Zaskar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    658
    I've used tubless tires on Mavic UST wheels for two yearssome years ago. The lack of pinch flats was cool, but never felt that big of a improvement in riding quality and traction.

    On my fatbike wheels I have a single layer of duct tape for rimtape and use Schwalbe ultralight freeride tubes. Quite a light combo and works really well.

    Tubeless has it's advantages, but I still go for tubes

  5. #30
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
    Reputation: MendonCycleSmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    12,932
    Quote Originally Posted by ozzybmx View Post
    Theres someone who trolls the FatBike forum and neg reps people....
    It's funny you say that, I just checked mine, and apparently got some for liking and encouraging use of Leftys with fatties, but for not having an equally glowing supportive position on Maverick SC32's. I find them to be one of the less stiff forks I've tried, sorry, but it's my experience, shoot me.

    Opinions are only good if shared by all I guess.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  6. #31
    addicted to chunk
    Reputation: Shark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    5,224
    Quote Originally Posted by Ze_Zaskar View Post
    I'm I the only one who still prefers tubes?
    You might be the last....

    How often do you flat?

    First few months when I still had tubes, I flatted so often, I just couldn't stand it anymore.
    Riding.....

  7. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    259
    My biggest issue with tubeless is the fear. I know that neither my rims (clownshoes) nor my tires are designed to run tubeless. I am concerned that at some inopportune time, my tire will roll or burp and I will crash. That said, I had so many tubes fail in the month or so before I did the conversion that tubeless conversion became the only sensible course of action. I do still carry a spare tube or two though.

  8. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nvphatty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    6,042
    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    You might be the last....

    How often do you flat?

    First few months when I still had tubes, I flatted so often, I just couldn't stand it anymore.
    nope there's two of us and i won't be converting. Both methods are a pain to some degree be it initial setup, be it on the trail fix etc.

  9. #34
    mighty sailin' man
    Reputation: MiniTrail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    4,781
    Quote Originally Posted by Ze_Zaskar View Post
    I'm I the only one who still prefers tubes?
    no worry you've got company. All the tubeless faithful still carry a spare tube. That alone says something IMO.

    Thicker tubes made a big enough difference for me that flats aren't that big a problem anymore. If I had enough trouble with flats and only needed one pair of tires it might be more appealing. Must be something to it as enough people swear by it

    I just don't see it working with 4 sets (and counting) of tires. We finally have some real options for tread and I don't want to commit to having one pair sealed to a rim
    Quote Originally Posted by davidarnott
    wheelies, beyond being the best way over any sort of obstacle, both above or below, are are the steedliest expresstion of joy

  10. #35
    Laramie, Wyoming
    Reputation: alphazz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,478
    All the tubeless faithful still carry a spare tube. That alone says something IMO.
    I don't carry a tube. I see no point in it.

    Through the years I've seen plenty of handlebars, stems, forks, and frames break while on rides. No one carries extra of those items.

  11. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nvphatty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    6,042
    Quote Originally Posted by alphazz View Post
    I don't carry a tube. I see no point in it.

    Through the years I've seen plenty of handlebars, stems, forks, and frames break while on rides. No one carries extra of those items.
    a bit extreme comparo to say the least. I see no point in going tubeless either but i also know it's functional but just not what i prefer.

  12. #37
    Vagician
    Reputation: EPcycles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    295
    Frequently changing tires is a good argument for using tubes.

    Also, I carry a spare tube, tools, and food always regardless of tubeless or tubed.

  13. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ze_Zaskar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    658
    On my around 100 miles on the Pugs I'm yet to have a flat, and my area has a large amount of thorns (Rubus armeniacus mostly). I use Slime on my tubes, which really helps and overcomes something that sometimes is made sound like tubeless exclusive.

    I think it's important to mention that tubes still have some advantages over tubeless.
    - Way more flexibility, you can change wheels and tires with no fuss;
    - No problems in slashing tires, you can just sew them;
    - Regular Slime is a lot more durable than most latex based products used to seal tubeless setups;
    - Easier to repair anywhere;
    - No need to worry about tire-rim relationships.
    Just the ones that came to my head right now

    Nothing wrong with tubeless, just not for me. I would probaly use it if I was a racer, but I'm not. My bike is closer in concept to an expedition LR Defender than to a Mitsubishi Pajero Evo (that would be a Beargrease?), so the setup is accordingly different


    Quote Originally Posted by alphazz View Post
    I don't carry a tube. I see no point in it.
    You'll see the point when you open an hole on your sidewall in the middle of nowhere. Been there, done that

  14. #39
    Laramie, Wyoming
    Reputation: alphazz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,478
    You'll see the point when you open an hole on your sidewall in the middle of nowhere. Been there, done that
    Well, let's see. I've been riding mountain bikes since the early 80's when we received the first production Diamond Backs in our shop. I've never opened a hole on my sidewall. But if I did, it's an easy repair requiring a patch just like patching a tube.

  15. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nvphatty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    6,042
    Quote Originally Posted by alphazz View Post
    Well, let's see. I've been riding mountain bikes since the early 80's when we received the first production Diamond Backs in our shop. I've never opened a hole on my sidewall. But if I did, it's an easy repair requiring a patch just like patching a tube.
    he's not speaking of a pin hole that a toob requires but something along the lines of what would require a boot, ie a 1/2" gash of sorts.

  16. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ze_Zaskar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    658
    I've opened sidewall slashes that I couldn't patch even if my life depended on it. On a tubed tire that can be repaired with a little dental floss and that's it

  17. #42
    Laramie, Wyoming
    Reputation: alphazz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,478
    Come on guys. If you can patch it to run a tube, you can patch it to run tubeless.

  18. #43
    Dr Gadget is IN
    Reputation: wadester's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,751
    I live in thorn country. In skinny tires, I went tubeless long ago - using stan's rims and rimstrips with DIY sealant. I found the positive change in rolling resistance to be well worth the change, but the "go a year w/o a flat" was the deal closer.

    But now, with fatties - pressures are 1/3 what I ran on the skinnies. With normal profile skinnyrims, at 30psi, there were burping issues especially when doing fast corrective steering on slow techy sections. My concern with tubeless fatties is more tread grip and less pressure leading to opening the bead. I note that this is on my local trails/conditions.

    I have never been a gram counter, but I know that my skinny tubeless setups were not lighter than a minimalist's tube setup - but they were lighter than the thornproof tubes filled with Slime that let me ride w/o flats!

    With fatties, I'm actually running moto tubes which are equivalent to the Surly Toobs (except schraeder valved). I have been slowly working on an inflatable beadlock system which should hold the beads tightly, as well as acting as a "run flat" insert. In the meantime, tubes work ok as long as they have sealant in them.
    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

    WSS/OSS: Open Source Sealant

  19. #44
    Dr Gadget is IN
    Reputation: wadester's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,751
    Quote Originally Posted by Ze_Zaskar View Post
    I've opened sidewall slashes that I couldn't patch even if my life depended on it. On a tubed tire that can be repaired with a little dental floss and that's it
    And you can do the same on a tubeless sidewall. Sew it back together and let the sealant seal it. Baseball stitch works best.
    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

    WSS/OSS: Open Source Sealant

  20. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ze_Zaskar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    658
    Quote Originally Posted by wadester View Post
    And you can do the same on a tubeless sidewall. Sew it back together and let the sealant seal it. Baseball stitch works best.


    Quote Originally Posted by alphazz View Post
    Come on guys. If you can patch it to run a tube, you can patch it to run tubeless.
    It's not the same thing, a repaired slashed tire may be only capable of keeping the sidewall together and the tube inside
    Small slashes can be patched, but bigger ones may be impossible to repair that way. Also, sometimes the dental floss of a sewed slash can start to rip thru the sidewall fibers

  21. #46
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    7,165
    Quote Originally Posted by Ze_Zaskar View Post
    I'm I the only one who still prefers tubes?
    Right there with ya.

    I still *want* tubeless to work on fatties. I run it on all my 29" bikes, and love it.

    So far the promise of improved performance (or even basic air retention) is a myth.

    With tubes I might get a flat every ~10th ride. Maybe.

    With tubeless I get 2 flats *between* every ride--they leak down to flat in a matter of hours.

    If I could get them to reliably hold air I *might* be able to trust them for longer rides--the kind where I could determine if the performance was actually different enough to be worth the hassle.

  22. #47
    i heart singletrack
    Reputation: mgersib's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,544
    Quote Originally Posted by ozzybmx View Post
    I don't mind the tubes in my fatbike but would prefer Tubeless, but I'm not splitting tubes to do it. I'm going to have a good go at doing it with tape in the next week or two.
    There really isn't much of a trick to the Gorilla Tape method. Just start with clean parts (clean the rims and rim strip (if you're using cutout rims) with alcohol and let it dry before you start taping and also, it helps to install the tire with a tube first, and seat one of the beads, and also use the tube to make sure your tape is pressed down in a uniform manner on the rim surface. Then, air down the tire, remove the tube, install the tubeless valve stem and sealant, pop your bead back on, go to your compressor, and carefully air it up, making sure not to blow the bead off as it beads up (typically the consequence of the tire attempting to bead asymmetrically on the rim).

    I just built a new set of Marge Lite rims over the weekend, and they were just as easy to set up tubeless as the Rolling Darryls they replaced (and are a ton lighter as well).

    Cheers,
    MG
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tubeless vs tubes??-margelite_amclassicvalve_sm.jpg  

    Tubeless vs tubes??-margelite_muk_sm.jpg  


  23. #48
    Living the thug life.
    Reputation: Logantri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    731
    Do other people have the same problem as mikesee, ie. poor air retention? Can you go a few days without airing it up?
    I proudly ride for these guys.

    My blog.

  24. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    928
    Quote Originally Posted by Logantri View Post
    Do other people have the same problem as mikesee, ie. poor air retention? Can you go a few days without airing it up?
    older (i.e., having seen more use not more years) tires tend to be worse in this regard. My 29er tires (ardent 29.4 EXO) will have drips on the sidewalls and my WTB's (2.3, exiwolf?) will have wet looking sidewalls a lot of the time. Generally tires vary a lot in this regard. My surly Bud's seem to lose no air whatsoever, but they're also newer than the ardent.

    Even with my ardent, I often only pump it up once per week and will thus not pump it up before my second ride of the week; I might though for the third or fourth.

  25. #50
    Vagician
    Reputation: EPcycles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    295
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    With tubeless I get 2 flats *between* every ride--they leak down to flat in a matter of hours.
    Never had that problem. Are you using sealant? What's your process?

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •