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  1. #1
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    Thudbuster +fatty question

    Just built up a 907 with rd/knards for the lady friend and she has some back issues. Considering a thudbuster post but was thinking the st version might be the most reasonable for our bikes. Anyone with experience here? I know Ive seen a few LT's mounted on fatbikes.

  2. #2
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    I've been addicted to thudbusters for about a year now. The ST and LT are different. I feel like the LT is more "tunable" because of the 2 pc elastomer vs the 1 pc of the ST. I'm not sure you'd notice the ST in practice on the Fat Bike. I use my ST as a stoker post for my wife on our road tandem, and on my road touring bike. The LT I used last year on my Mukluk and it goes to my Gary Fisher wahoo sometimes. It's now on the Fatback. It takes up the larger jolts and will minimize any buzzing from tires and route surfaces. The fat tires compensate for more than the ST so I don't think I'd do that. I would try with rigid seatpost and if that doesn't work go right to the LT.


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  3. #3
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    I don't have a Thudbuster, but I looked into them quite a bit, to sum up what people were saying: the ST will barely take the edge out of the bumps [it is really more suited to road use, and using it for any offroad use will not really yield much -if any- difference to a decent metal/ carbon seatpost, even for people who need more comfort], and that the LT will actually noticeably absorb a good bit of the offroad bumps and chatter [from reports they say it does change the feel of the bike some, but it feels like the bike has a sort of rear suspension, but the changed feel of the bike is either a non issue or it is an issue]

    Keep in mind that the thudbuster seatposts will add a bit of weight to the bike compared to a regular seatpost, and that you wouldn't really be able to use a large seat bag properly with one. Also it has moving parts so unlike regular seatposts it has a much higher chance of failure [a number of people claimed they lasted right around a year of use, YMMV]


    Ultimately from what I've read and tried myself I think getting a nice saddle that works well is the best bet for staying comfortable. If she isn't doing really crazy off road riding I would recommend a nice leather saddle like one of the Brooks or the US made Selle Anatomica [currently on sale for $100], I don't have that many miles on my Selle Anatomicas yet but I like how they work on my road bike and my necromancer pugs [they give a bit of a suspended feel and they flex nicely absorbing a bit of the road and offroad bumps while being comfortable saddles], again YMMV

  4. #4
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    Keep in mind that temperature affects elastomers; they get real hard in the cold. So a Thudbuster may not work well if you plan to do a lot of winter riding, but may help if you ride where/when its warmer.

    Niner claims that their FRO carbon post is tuned to have more give than a typical post; that might be worth a look as well.

    HTH.

  5. #5
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    At lower pression, the tires take away all the smal and medium bumps much more efficient than a thudbuster can ever do and without adjusting your riding position, so there is nothing left to do for the thudbuster but to make the bike heavier!

    For me an adjustable seatpost is a better upgrade, it allows me to use my leg to absorb the big blows the tire can't absorb!

  6. #6
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    I've got both versions of the Thudbuster.

    I'm not convinced you'd feel any benefit on a fatbike.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  7. #7
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    I used one for several seasons on different bikes. The ST was almost useless on a MTB because it doesn't give enough squish to allow you to stay seated on rough stuff. It was fine for broken pavement of dirt roads to take the edge off. The LT I used for a season on my Pugsley and it worked quite well. The elastomers don't change much unless it's super cold, and it had enough squish to help with the bumps when combined with low tire pressure. They are boat anchor heavy though. and I would look into getting a high quality Ti post or even a carbon post like the Niner RDO (which is reported to have a good amount of flex in it) if you are just looking to take the edge off. It might be worth looking into a springy Brooks saddle- people swear by them for comfort.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by browjenofer View Post
    it allows me to use my leg to absorb the big blows the tire can't absorb!
    That doesn't make sense to me?

  9. #9
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    I'm more likely to tweak my back straining up the hills than because of bumps, so I'm doubting the thudbuster would help her, but I guess it depends on her issues.

  10. #10
    Fat!Drunk!Slow!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nothing's impossible View Post
    That doesn't make sense to me?
    That's a spam bot reply, there's an embedded IMG that has a bad URL.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    I'm more likely to tweak my back straining up the hills than because of bumps, so I'm doubting the thudbuster would help her, but I guess it depends on her issues.
    indeed, If I have problems with my back I climb a 20/36 to avoid too much strain!
    A more racy geometry also helps me in those (luckily rare) cases, it gets more weight on the arms, so less on the lower back. But it's straining for the neck and schoulders and difficult to ride downhill.

    I liked the thudbuster on my stiff 26'er hardtail, it allowed me to remain seated and pedeling on small or medium bumps, but it was far from the comfort of a real fully.
    Now on the sandman hoggar I don't need it anymore, not even with the 29'er tires!
    With the fat tires, I have more comfort than with my 26'er fully!

  12. #12
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    I love the ST on my Moonie, just enough when combined with the tires to soak up the sharp hits and protect my spine's discs. I have both, I choose the ST for my fat bikes.

  13. #13
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    Love it. Mixed bag on all the responses as I figured i'd get! Thanks for all the personal experiences and details on what you like and didn't. Like many things I suspect the right answer here is "it depends or try it and see"

    Right now we're running a 27.2 syncos post that has a ton of flex and about 260mm extension so she should get a bit of give from it. I'm going to give her a bit of time on it and then we might try the Thudbuster. If not it could always go on fleabay or back into a parts bin for a potential tandem build someday.

  14. #14
    Salsa Mukluk 3
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    I have the LT on my Mukluk. The combination feels just as effective at absorbing bumps as the rear suspension on my old Giant ATX. I really like the LT on the fat bike, so I won't be switching back to the stock seatpost anytime soon. YMMV.

  15. #15
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    I have been looking at the current sus seatpost options. Good info.

    Here is another sus option I have been watching be developed...
    BodyFloat


  16. #16
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    I was having back issues on my 907 until I got fitted and now my back is much happier.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by JordyB View Post
    That's a spam bot reply, there's an embedded IMG that has a bad URL.
    Well, it doesn't make sense to me, No spambot

    With the thudbuster the sadle remains in the way, preventing me from using my legs for efficient damping!

    With the fatbike the the tires absorb the smal bumps completely, there is hardly travel in the post unless its uncomfortably soft.

    The moment I tried a big jump with it the sadlebridges broke during the landing, The joplin lowered the sadle 10 cm, Now ordered a black that will offer me 125 mm.
    the thudbuster gives me about 5 cm's, insufficient for the bigger impakts!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    I've got both versions of the Thudbuster.

    I'm not convinced you'd feel any benefit on a fatbike.
    It can depending on how you set it up
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Thudbuster +fatty question-dscf3539.jpg  


  19. #19
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    Keep in mind it is a setback post, and it will move further back and down once you seat on it.
    For a fatbike, I would get the 400mm since the seatubes are usually shorter.
    Besides that, I love the way the ST takes the edge off.
    Only complain is the extreme setback, but a longer saddle fixed it.

  20. #20
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    I find with the elastomers on the LT that the best way to set it up, is to use one softer elastomers than recommended! that just me. A lot of people fail to set it properly to there weight which leads to bad reviews.

  21. #21
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    As someone that has two herniated disc's and that has tried various methods to dampen the blows to my back. I can give my views I the gear I have tried and use.

    Brooks aged leather B17 with the springs - nice seat but could not get it to work for me. Too hard and the springs don't do much until AFTER the impact. Didn't take the edge off, back pain was there during & post ride and the taint didn't like it. I used it on-road only on a BadBoy. Numb down there.

    Cane Creek Thudbuster ST- came on the Fargo. Used both on and off road on the Fargo and Mukluk2. The Fargos been gone for a year now but the Thudbuster has been on the Mukluk more often at not. Not as absorbing and tunable as the LT but its not meant to be. It helps for times when your seated and a root or rock jumps out in front of you. It takes the edge off initially without being overly exaggerated (bouncy) like the LT. It has some weight to it but that's because it's a mechanically engineered device with moving parts. Combined with a comfortable seat, slightly weight forward riding position and the HuDu's aired up to 12-14 psi (just enough to avoid balloon tired bounce) it works great. The ST will never be sold off, it just works.

    Thudbuster LT works great too but I find it to be maybe too bouncy even while seated pedaling. Combined with a Jones Loop bar the riding position is too upright and makes it real bouncy. Took the jones off in favor off a more forward position it worked a little better but the bounce was still there. Too much undampened rebound and travel, my back loved it but it just isn't for me. So it's on the forsale market. It does what it's supposed to do.

    Currently installed a Thompson layback post with my Koobi PRS saddle from my road bike to see how that works. Haven't tried it yet but I know if I don't like the combination the ST will go right back on.

  22. #22
    Nemophilist
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    Hey;

    I started off my Fatbike odyssey with an old Rock Shox suspension post I had around. I could tell very well that it was the way to go, even though the RS did not offer that much give. My butt was still taking a bit of a beating. A friend gave me an LT Thudbuster, and I have not looked back. It may be the best single mod I have ever made to a bike. Yes, it can be bouncy at times, but no more so that an over inflated fat tire. With the TB installed I am able to run much lower rear tire pressure without thumping the rim, which is something no one has mentioned and is a distinct advantage. It has also made a moderately comfortable saddle when mounted on the RS much more comfortable.

    I don't notice any of the geo anomalies that others complain about, and the bike is already heavy so what's a little more? The benefits... outweigh... the weight penalty. All my Fatbikes will have one!
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  23. #23
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    To take the edge of what's left after the big tires the post needs to be rather soft for me. A big issue was that the rear tire goes into resonance with the pedaling on higher speeds if the post is set rather soft.
    The constant change in the position during pedaling is also disturbing.

    With the post harder it hardly does a thing anymore, it started moving at the big blows, and than it hardly provides travel. the first bad landing costed me a sadle!

  24. #24
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    I ran one of these last winter and it's back on the bike now: NitroPro - Gas Suspension Seatposts

    Winter is when I need it, pedaling over lumpy snowpack. No experience with thudbuster but the nitropro makes a notable comfort difference for seated pedaling over bumpy stuff. So far has held up well, a bit of side-to-side slop but don't notice it riding.

  25. #25
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    Well, I liked the thudbuster better than linear traveling seatposts, they develop sideways motion and the positionchange is better with the thudbuster.

    But each his own!

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