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Thread: Studded Nate

  1. #1
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    Studded Nate

    Has anyone out there succesfully studded a Nate tire? I'm worried about the sipes in the lugs and whether they'll hold a stud? Thanks.

    Bill

  2. #2
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    I would like to see some studded Nates too, as right now icy conditions dominate all trails in my neck of the woods.

  3. #3
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    The Nates stud up really nicely. I put a couple hundred in one last season and rode the tire in lots of different conditions and never ripped one out. They work so well that I pulled them from my BFL then sold the tire and studded up another Nate for this season. The sipe actually makes it a little easier to install. Can't post any pics right now since I'm away from my bike but I'm sure someone will post some. If not I will in a couple weeks when I get home.
    The LPG

  4. #4
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    I set up a pair last winter with GripStuds.
    Never lost a stud....
    But...it's going to depend on conditions on how well they'll work.

    I live north of Boston, MA. We get snow...that tends to freeze...with rocks sticking out and bare areas.

    The studs work great on ice...as expected....but you can feel the drag of the studs on ice and frozen hardpack or dirt roads.
    They do NOT work on rocks....which we have a lot of sticking through the snow. And they do nothing in snow.

    I am running a set of Dillingers this year. Lighter, much less rolling resistance and they work on rocks. I put these on....we've had mixed conditions where there's bare areas as well as ice and they are much better for me.
    Your mileage may vary....
    Last edited by the mayor; 01-21-2013 at 07:21 AM.

  5. #5
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    here you go

    Spike pattern Nate

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    I live in Vermont and we have similar conditions that can vary widely. Seems like that's what a modern winter looks like. Sounds like the Dillingers make a good all-around tire. Do you think you gave up much snow traction when compared with the Nates? Thanks all for the feedback so far. Fat biking = problem solving...the good kind!

    Bill

  7. #7
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    used grip studs on a nate, larry and even an endomorph, all worked great
    the dillanger doesnt have a good tread pattern IMO , I tried it front and rear and reversed in the back, its ok in the front but the Larry up front and nate in the rear kicks ass. the dillanger slips way too much in snow and those tiny studs dont give me much confidence. as mentioned above studded tires on rocks are slippery because the studs cant dig in, if your tire is studded and not slipping on rocks I would say its because the studs are too small and not making good contact

    downsides
    heavier, the larry with 150 grip studs is slightly heavier thatn the dillanger, the nate with 150 studs is almost a pound heavier

    nate is a slow rolling tire with or with out studs, you can definately feel the drag
    but if you have the legs and lungs its almost unstoppable

    the dillanger suffers from the same issues as comercial studded tires, if you ride in rocky areas you will lose studs and tear knobs.
    the nates, larrys and endos never lost a single grip stud and never tore any tread

  8. #8
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    pictures
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Studded Nate-natestud.jpg  


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    larry
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Studded Nate-larrystud.jpg  


  10. #10
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    in action
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Studded Nate-action.jpg  


  11. #11
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    DanO,

    Thanks for the feedback. Great info! Do you think you needed the full 150 studs per tire or could you have done with less? Was the install easy? Any tear-out? Thanks. Photos were very helpful...

    Bill

  12. #12
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    I studded up a Larry and a Nate. I have 125 studs in the Larry and I have 76 studs in my Nate. They worked out great and have been the best for the winter we are having here in MN. Look here to see the Larry.

    Service Center Blog - Freewheel Bike Shop - Minneapolis - Twin Cities - St. Paul
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  13. #13
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    Just added grip studs to a Nate last night. (thanks for the group buy, Drew) 76 studs along the pairs of small square knobs between the flappers.

    I was impressed how easily they were to put in. Mounted the tire on a rim, and pumped it up to 20 PSI, and then inserted them using a screwdriver handle on the tool. They look like they will stay nicely, and not poke through to the tube.

    My plan is to use another 76 homebrews (stainless drill-head screws plus aluminum nuts) on the sides. That will keep cost down and give better bite when the bike isn't vertical, while not sacrificing the wear that we get from carbide. We'll see.

    Last year's homebrew studded Larrys are still working excellent. But dirt is starting to show on our trails again. So I'm hoping for a solution that won't wear out on the dirt and pavement while waiting for the next snowfall.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by playinVT View Post
    DanO,

    Thanks for the feedback. Great info! Do you think you needed the full 150 studs per tire or could you have done with less? Was the install easy? Any tear-out? Thanks. Photos were very helpful...

    Bill
    I started with a hundred, didnt seem as good as my old Nokian extremes so I bought another hundred and split them between the 2 tires, havent lost a single one and we really havent had much snow here. in contrast I lost 25 on my ice spikers last season and several knobs were torn . I bought a dillanger this year, psyced about the weight, but dissappointed with the grip and also tore a couple of knobs and lost a few studs. Currently I have the dillanger up front and the nate in the rear mainly because im too lazy to swap the diianger for the larry.
    I started the install using a screw gun( drill) but found the studs would walk around before catching, so I switched to a hand held nut driver works best ( grip studs has a hand held tool) took about an hour per tire at a leisurly pace while watching tv

  15. #15
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    I got my Nate studded up with grip studs tonight. I used a ratchet driver to prevent putting them in too deep. I ended up using 148. I wasn't sure putting studs on the outermost row of knobs would be useful, but put them in anyway.

    Next up is the Bud.


  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by gecho View Post
    I got my Nate studded up with grip studs tonight.
    Holy crap dude!

    You weren't kidding.
    Latitude: 44.93 N

  17. #17
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    The knobs on the Bud were quite a bit softer, making it trickier to stud, particularly the smaller knobs. I chewed up one to the point I didn't think it would hold a stud, so I ended up using 135 studs. Due to the profile of the Bud on a Rolling Darryl I didn't think it was necessary to put any studs on the outside knobs.


  18. #18
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    I took the tires out for a test ride on a nearby outdoor rink. It had been flooded this morning so the ice was fresh and smooth. Excellent propulsion from the Nate as I could accelerate very quickly on the ice.

    I may have been incorrect about not needing studs on the outside of the Bud. I could feel some slipping if I leaned while turning. No slipping at all if I kept the bike completely upright while turning. I'll try adding some to the outer knobs. And a few in the toes of my MXZ302s.

    edit: Looking at it again, it looks like I was right the first time. Those knobs don't contact the ground unless I'm at an angle that would be stupid to attempt on ice. Slippage is probably due to less weight on the front end. I'll double the studs either side of center lug instead of doing every 2nd one.
    Last edited by gecho; 01-23-2013 at 03:45 PM.

  19. #19
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    Results so far- I should have listened! The guys that said you need 125+ studs are right! I put 75 studs into F/R tires on both my bike and my girlfriends. On my bike I ran the studs on the outer lugs and left the center open as an experiment, guessing that I would add more. On my girlfriends ride I ran the studs opposite, favoring the center treads.

    We did a ride that included some very long ice floes and then some hard pack snow mixed with ice. I learned that the center studs were far more effective when traversing flat ice. I'm sure the edge studs would be helpful in cornering but on my tires, with all that exposed rubber in the center I could only manage absolutely flat ice. Any double-fall line slope and it was over for me!

    Interestingly, my buddy was one his 29er with 2.25 Schwalbe Ice Spikers and he was able to ride everything including a steep ice floe that looked like something you should rope up for! Pretty impressive! We didn't dare try it.

    So the bottom line seems to be the ratio of rubber to studs when you get to pure ice. Our studs setup as they were did great on the packed snow-a real improvement but I've already added more studs. Thanks so much for all the helpful feedback.

  20. #20
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    I'm on my way to 250 in my front Nate. Can't justify the cost of Grip Studs, so I'm going the steel set screw route. Shitload of work; I hope they stay in the tires. Photos to follow when complete.

  21. #21
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    4 dollar route

    Quote Originally Posted by cendres View Post
    I'm on my way to 250 in my front Nate. Can't justify the cost of Grip Studs, so I'm going the steel set screw route. Shitload of work; I hope they stay in the tires. Photos to follow when complete.
    Went the four dollar route. Ghetto but I stick on the ice. Studded Nate-sudded-larry.jpgStudded Nate-studded-nate.jpg

  22. #22
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    I'm going to try a DIY stud job using these and a split tube tubeless:
    Socket Head Set Screws Cone Point

    I saw some with them inserted from the inside you can put them in deep enough that they won't come in contact with the tube (if you run them). $20 including shipping for 200 of them.
    Big Strings, Big Wheels, The Jisch Blog

  23. #23
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    I'm also doing that at this moment, seems to work fine but it is a hell of a job to do so many studs in a nate.

    I Payed about 12 euros for 500 pieces, sharp cone, M3, 10mm
    included shipping

    I will try to make some pictures later

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