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  1. #1
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    Sandman -Fatback

    Can anyone explain how an aluminum fatback compares to an aluminum sandman gobi?

  2. #2
    Fat!Drunk!Slow!
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    I'm not sure you'll find a single fat rider who's ever ridding both extensively since they are both so far apart geographically in the world. It should come down to geometry and parts used.

  3. #3
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    Like JordyB said, only know of a few Sandman's here on U.S. soil. From what I understand though, it's designed to be more of an all around, cross country fat bike and almost all of the pictures I've seen show them with Ft. suspension. Lots of pic's of them trail riding too.

    The Fatback has evolved as a "floatation" specific bike. Geometry that excels in snow, sand & other stuff where high floatation is needed.

    I have a custom fat bike that was built more for XC and all around and was built specific for the Maverick fork. I would never claim it's just like a Sandman... or anything else. But it does have geo like an XC 29er and Ft. Susp. It's quite fun and able on the trail... bad a$$ on beat up jeep trails. And it will do the soft sand & snow too... but not like the Fatback. The Fatback seems to put the rider in a position to do they're best at keeping it going in the softest, loosest conditions. I've ridden the Fatback on trails too and it's plenty fun. I turn the stem upside down for that.

  4. #4
    NONDURO
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    Quote Originally Posted by ward View Post
    I have a custom fat bike that was built more for XC and all around and was built specific for the Maverick fork. I would never claim it's just like a Sandman... or anything else. But it does have geo like an XC 29er and Ft. Susp. It's quite fun and able on the trail... bad a$$ on beat up jeep trails.
    Wait! Have we seen pictures of your custom fatbike before? I must have been asleep when you posted them. Would love to see!!!
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    Wait! Have we seen pictures of your custom fatbike before? I must have been asleep when you posted them. Would love to see!!!
    When this was built the only choices were the Wildfire, the Ti Fatback, a limited amount of Thunderwing's and the pugs had just come out. I told the builder I wanted an XC HT 29er built wide enough for Large Marge's and Endo's. This is what we came up with. Highest BB I've seen on a fat bike and the 1st ALU fat bike I knew of.

    FILE0038

    FILE0037

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    It's been my main mt. bike for a few years now... it's just a wide 29er.Maverick's still holding together but I have considered a Lefty... keep waiting to see if something "production" wise pops up. Sandman's new prototype inverted fork looks cool. Hope we'll be able to get 'em over here.
    Last edited by ward; 12-20-2012 at 11:54 PM.

  6. #6
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    I have never ridden the fatback, and only briefly ridden a gobi, but I have a sandman with a flame fork.

    With the fork completely low, say zero to 20 mm of travel you have a very nerveus, responsive bike, lower air resistance ,...
    Nice for beachraces, road rides and XC rides with fat tires,.. You hardly have travel but the tires provide more than enough travel on that kind of rides.
    With the 29'er wheels it's a pretty agressive bike!

    With the fork complete up it's a completely different bike!
    The bike becomes gravity orientated, the steering becomes rather stable, you get less weigth on the front wheel,... pedeling becomes a bit less responsive but the bike remains rather fast for its weight and drag in the offroad climbs, but on technical and downhill stuff the bike is so inviting and foregiving ,...

    This stable comfy riding setting works also pretty good in deeper snow and soft sand.


    With the fork in the midle position you have a nice trailbike. it remains responsive, and yet it provides enough confidence for technical rides!
    I mostly ride this setting.

    I have no idea how other frames cope with such addaptation in fork hight, but with the sandman it works great, i would spend the extra bucks on a front suspension!!

  7. #7
    NONDURO
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    Quote Originally Posted by ward View Post
    When this was built the only choices were the Wildfire, the Ti Fatback, a limited amount of Thunderwing's and the pugs had just come out. I told the builder I wanted an XC HT 29er built wide enough for Large Marge's and Endo's. This is what we came up with. Highest BB I've seen on a fat bike and the 1st ALU fat bike I knew of.

    FILE0038

    FILE0037

    Loaded (+beer)
    S1140029

    It's been my main mt. bike for a few years now... it's just a wide 29er.Maverick's still holding together but I have considered a Lefty... keep waiting to see if something "production" wise pops up. Sandman's new prototype inverted fork looks cool. Hope we'll be able to get 'em over here.
    Cool! Thanks for sharing. How does the ride compare to your Fatback?
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  8. #8
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    Ward, who built it? You don't see too many small builders who work in aluminum.

  9. #9
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    I could not find it using the search but Ward talked about the bike in a thread well over a year ago .

    3D Racing (Chris Herting), Rock Lobster ( Paul Sadoff ) TET Cycles(Tom Teasdale) and Spooky (Frank The Welder) all build great aluminum bicycles and I believe they have all built at least a couple of Fat Bikes.

    Cheers,
    Steven

    Quote Originally Posted by Andy FitzGibbon View Post
    Ward, who built it? You don't see too many small builders who work in aluminum.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy FitzGibbon View Post
    Ward, who built it? You don't see too many small builders who work in aluminum.
    It was built by Oscar Camerana (Owner of Simple Bicycles) here in Yakima Wa. I believe he is now in Portland (whether or not he still operates "Simple" I'm not sure... I'll check. It's early enough that it has a 150mm rear hub- only a few 165's available then and hard to come by so we made it simple. It will only fit the 65mm rims but that's okay, that's what works best with the Mav too. He worked with ALU quite a bit at the time and I'm sure still does. He built Donny Robinson's BMX frame he rode in the 2008 Olympics. Also lots of dirt jump bikes and several "one off" customs including track bikes. I don't think it (my fat bike) was his favorite project at the time... it was pretty new stuff. we both scratched our heads a bit getting it figured out.

    Turned out to be one of my most ridden bicycles ever! Like i've said, it may not handle the snow and sand as well as the Fatback (though it will handle it) but it's my 1st choice for trail & all around riding now. I was going to build a set of 29ers for it but put a set of Husker Du's on it recently and called it good. This bike never stops being a ton of fun! Of course I say that about the Fatback and my CX bike too... but this bike is different. The BB is Pretty high- with the saddle at max. hight, I have to reach with my tip toes to touch the ground. Some might think "high center of gravity" but not so w/ such a "big" bike. It may not seem big but next to a 26er it looks huge. the high BB gets me up on top of the thing; puts a little more weight back on the front end; seems to give me some "leverage" over the thing. It also has a 70.5* HT (pre-loaded) and a pretty long TT to keep the front end out front on downhills. The high BB also gives it tons of pedal clearance.

    Edit- Just found this: Oregon Manifest Team Simple Bike Co. That's Oscar standing with the bike.

    and this: Untitled Document Not sure what his future plans are... he did build another fat bike similar to mine for a guy at my favorite LBS. It's currently got a modified (spaced for 29er) Shiver on it.
    Last edited by ward; 12-21-2012 at 11:40 PM.

  11. #11
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    I've never ridden a Fatback (in fact, the only other fatbike I've ever swung my leg over was a Moonlander). But I think I've ridden all Sandman models. It's pretty simple really: in stock form, their ride is like a normal mountainbike. That's THE one first comment I hear from everybody after taking mine around a parking lot "this thing rides like a normal bike...!?!" You have to imagine the stunned expressions along with it .

    No weird feeling, no strange behaviour, no wanting to go straight or "falling" into a turn. Just... normal and very, very confidence inspiring. With a suspension fork, they're on the stable geometry side, be it with fat wheels or 29ers.

    With their rigid cromo fork and regular 3.8" tires they're more nervous. An Atacama is more Dirt-style in its behaviour. With Black Floyd tires they get almost too skittish to my liking, but I see kids having fun with them in skateparks and such.
    With BFL's on, an Atacama gets more stable, behaving more like one with front suspension. The Atacama Elias rode to 1st place in the Rovaniemi150 had BFL's and 80mm rims on it and it rode like a stable, well behaved (normal) bike. No bad manners at all.

    So geometry and behaviour is very much a question of tires too (everyone who has tried an Endomorph up front will probably agree ).
    I've ridden an Atacama with a suspension-corrected carbon 29er fork and 3.8" tires and that makes it normal-stable too, like with a suspension fork. The same with BFL's might make an ultra stable bike.
    I recently talked to a Gobi owner who has a Carver fork and 3.8" tires and he commented it as stable as well, "enduro bike" like he described it.

  12. #12
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    Thanks for all the replies and photos.
    I am going to purchase a fat bike soon, but still undecided as to what brand and model.
    Although Gobi is my current favorite.

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