Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    483

    Packless Pack less

    Ok gents. I am looking to ditch my backpack for fat biking. I'd already gone with no backpack or hip pack on my MTB few years ago. So I am looking to do the same on the fat bike. I like not getting that sweaty back and also packing less stuff. I just seem to want to carry more stuff when I have a pack on.

    Two challenges arise for me:

    1) Tube. Where do you carry the tube? A gigantic seat pack? Maybe tape it to the back of the saddle?

    2) Pump. I typically carried the pump strapped to the bottle cage. The problem is when I inevitably go through slush, water gets in and freezes, rendering the pump useless. Where else to carry it?

    I want to minimize cargo as much as possible. My typical rides are 10-30 miles, so I won't need a lot of stuff. Typically, a tube, pump, multitool, patch kit, needle/thread, snacks and water. Maybe a light shell, but I can just strap that to the bars.

    Thanks for any suggestions.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: toadmeister's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    54
    I just started Fatbiking last autumn. Don't have all your answers but can share my setup. I also do 10-30 mile rides. Refrence pic:

    -Rear rack, I have old surplus army saddlebags for clothes, and gear I don't dig out much. I can also tie down stuff to the top of the rack. Got a large bowie type knife there now.
    - Frame bag stores a lot of stuff. Haven't even utilized it's full potential yet. Panda custom designs.
    - No spare tube. I'm riding trails and am always a mile or two from a road, I can call for help if needed.
    - small front top tube bag for phone, small snacks, keys, other.
    - bottle cage on handlebars
    - salsa anything racks on front forks.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,461
    Frame bags rule
    Jason
    Disclaimer: www.paramountsports.net

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    26

    Revelate Visacha

    I suggest the Revelate Visacha sweat bag; bomber durability, easy on/off, and rolls up small if you carry a few items all the way to holding a ton.
    Quote Originally Posted by 2:01 View Post
    Ok gents. I am looking to ditch my backpack for fat biking. I'd already gone with no backpack or hip pack on my MTB few years ago. So I am looking to do the same on the fat bike. I like not getting that sweaty back and also packing less stuff. I just seem to want to carry more stuff when I have a pack on.

    Two challenges arise for me:

    1) Tube. Where do you carry the tube? A gigantic seat pack? Maybe tape it to the back of the saddle?

    2) Pump. I typically carried the pump strapped to the bottle cage. The problem is when I inevitably go through slush, water gets in and freezes, rendering the pump useless. Where else to carry it?

    I want to minimize cargo as much as possible. My typical rides are 10-30 miles, so I won't need a lot of stuff. Typically, a tube, pump, multitool, patch kit, needle/thread, snacks and water. Maybe a light shell, but I can just strap that to the bars.

    Thanks for any suggestions.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,690
    Tubeless, spare tube 26 x 2.5 welterweight, tape/strap to frame in triangle.

    Frame bag, bar bag, seat bag are the standards. Personally, I prefer a good backpack as it doesn’t affect bike handling. Put the lightweight and bulky stuff on the bike, heavy stuff in the pack. Pick a pack with a decent waist belt, supportive and comfortable.

    Screw panniers, they don’t belong on anything off road, too loose and wide for single track.

    Don’t carry anything you won’t use on a daily basis. Make your gear serve dual purpose.

  6. #6
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    29,141
    I still do a minimalist camelback under my jacket on long rides though,
    because I simply need more water and that keeps it from freezing. On this large frame, I can run an XL frame bag and fit two water bottles in the top-compartment.

    Packless  Pack less-0108ddddc5d28f8aa5189e4c6d9ddf4a7868e4af14.jpgPackless  Pack less-img_4260.jpg
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  7. #7
    Spandex Ninja
    Reputation: webb-o's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    77
    I agree with you. I gave up on backpacks for trail riding and take a minimalist approach. I also usually do 10-30 mile rides on my fatty. I have two bottle cages for beverages (with mounting points for two more) and I strap a spare 26x2.5 tube to my seat rails. Sandwiched inside the folded tube is a tire lever, and a small Ziploc with a spare master chain link and a small patch kit. I carry my phone and multi tool and sometimes a snack in my shorts or jacket pocket. The pump is mounted to my downtube bottle cage. Yes, it freezes up and gets caked with mud, but luckily I've never needed it since I'm rolling tubeless. For longer rides or very cold conditions, I have a small frame pack for extra snacks or to carry an extra layer of clothing.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    330
    I love the freedom of no pack on a road bike. I use Relevate Designs lunch pouch and gas tank.

    Moving to fatty in winter I use the same on quick short rides And add frame bag for additional clothes on longer or deep cold trips. Hardest part is the deep cold and water tube. Hard to keep from freezing.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,717
    Doesn't someone sell a neoprene (?) pump sleeve that can be fastened to the DT/ST/bottle bosses? Basically a 1"dia x 12" tube.
    Though I'd seen, need one myself, but can't find while working on another project. Might help this guy out too.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    483
    Thanks for the inputs. While I love my bikepacking bags, I don't want to use them for these type of rides. I'd like to keep it minimal/light.

    The 2.5" tube is a good suggestion. I was carrying the ginormous, full size Surly toob. I can strap that underneath the saddle with the tool.

    For the pump. I like the sleeve idea. I may just wrap it several times in cling wrap to keep the water out. Hopefully that works.

    For water, I love my hydroflask thermos. I fill it with hot/warm water, cider, etc. and it stays nice and hot for hours. Add some snow to cool it down, if needed.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    4,994
    Quote Originally Posted by biscut View Post
    I love the freedom of no pack on a road bike. I use Relevate Designs lunch pouch and gas tank.

    Moving to fatty in winter I use the same on quick short rides And add frame bag for additional clothes on longer or deep cold trips. Hardest part is the deep cold and water tube. Hard to keep from freezing.
    Use the insulated cover for a camelbak tube? I carry a thermos of something hot when it's cold.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    4,994
    Quote Originally Posted by bme107 View Post
    Doesn't someone sell a neoprene (?) pump sleeve that can be fastened to the DT/ST/bottle bosses? Basically a 1"dia x 12" tube.
    Though I'd seen, need one myself, but can't find while working on another project. Might help this guy out too.
    A section of old mt bike inner tube and some velcro straps would work.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,726
    I've transitioned away from backpacks for all of my riding as well.

    Maybe a half frame bag, like the Revelate Tangle? Should be able to fir your pump, minimalist tube and tools, phone, as well as an extra layer or so. I think that's the best solution. That's about as minimal as you can get. There are also a couple of front triangle bags that may work better than a tangle, depending on your frame/bottle configuration:

    https://www.ovejanegrabikepacking.co...dgie-frame-bag

    https://restrap.co.uk/collections/frame-bags

  14. #14
    Te mortuo heres tibi sim?
    Reputation: scrublover's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    8,838
    Awesome Strap with Q-tube spare and a 20oz co2 cart - stick it wherever it'll fit.

    Awesome Strap under the seat with combo pump/co2 head. Some duct tape around the pump. Small bag with a couple small parts (spare rotor bolts - works for SPD cleat in a pinch, a long enough m6 bolt to use in a pinch for headset or brake caliper replacement, with a stack of washers and a nut on the end, a couple quick links, a half dozen glue-less patches) a Lite 2" tube. This actually goes on whichever bike I'm on, if going pack-less.

    Multi-tool with built in chain tool, camera go in short or pant pockets. Wallet/keys/phone/snacks/adult beverage go in other jacket/jersey or whatever pockets.

    Bottle in the cage if not too cold. Too cold? A Race-Face Stash tank under layer with a 50oz bladder - lets you route the hose under you outer layers to keep things from freezing.

    Otherwise, if not using the full pack but still wanting to carry a bit more I've really been digging using a Source Hydration Hipster pack. Keeps the weight low and doesn't give a sweaty back. http://sourceoutdoor.com/en/hydratio...hydration-belt




    Packless  Pack less-img_2750.jpgPackless  Pack less-img_2751.jpg
    These are also great to carry a bit more cargo without a sweaty back/bouncing/bulging pockets.
    Running Belts | Fitness Belts. The Original. SPIbelt®
    Florence Nightingale's Stormtrooper

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    209
    Cheapass (me) to the rescue. Moosetreks frame bag from Amazon. It ain't perfect, but it's pretty darn good and the price is fair. Measure your front triangle and make sure to get the right size.

  16. #16
    beer thief
    Reputation: radair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    4,823
    I carry a pump in a gas tank along with a couple Clif bars & misc items that I want close at hand. I also bought a Jerrycan and keep tools and tube in it, but tubeless has worked so well for me that I don't carry the tube unless it's a long remote ride. Frame bag if I'm carrying puffy jacket and extra gloves - again depends on the ride. I haven't worn a pack except on rare occasions in a couple of years.

    My lady has made a few sweet gas tanks and frame packs so you don't need to spend a lot of money if you can sew or know someone handy. There's a sticky in the bikepacking forum for DIY stuff like this.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,690
    It's kinda funny watching trends, swinging back and forth like a pendulum. At one point waist packs were hot, then Camelbak got people into backpacks, then it started swinging the other way, now waist packs are back.

    I've toured a ton, having weight on your back makes the bikes handle like crap. This isn't an issue on a road bike because you're cruising flat and smooth terrain. Now you want to talk about riding technical single track, bushwaking, riding for "fun" as well as to get somewhere, suddenly all that weight on your bike is really drag.

    Minimalist is always the way to go. I hiked a lot on the AT and PCT, got to the point that I only carried things I used every day, stopped cooking and went cold (soak food or use precooked), ditched the tent for a tarp or ultralight bivy, went to a lighter sleeping bag and learned to sleep in layers (layers double for warmth and rain/wind gear double for weather protection).

    I ran a section of the AT, four weeks, self sustained, my pack with two liters of water and 3-4 days of food weighed less than 20#. I rode a three day section of the Pinhoti on a muni, again self sustained, backpack weighed 15# with water and food. Riding near water sources allowed me to carry only essential water, a liter or so.

    It really depends on how you wrap your mind around the idea of "need" and how uncomfortable you are willing to be.

  18. #18
    Human Test Subject
    Reputation: Volsung's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,098
    The Swift Industries large Zeitgeist is pretty dope (and pricey, but will last forever and is waterproof). I use mine with a Caradice QR bagman support and can pop it off and carry it in with me if I go somewhere. I had one of the original Viscachas and didn't like the swaying and how it didn't have a light mount.

    You can get Caradice bags for a lot cheaper but they weigh twice as much and don't look quite as good.
    You change your own flats? Support your LBS and pay them to instead.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    483
    I've actually got a tangle frame bag that fits great. But again, too much for typical rides. And it takes up too much room in the frame that I cannot fit the water bottle in there (medium Pugsley). So, with the suggestions given here, I will track down a 2.5" tube (I think Maxxis is the only one that makes these), put it on the saddle with the multitool. Use a gas tank up front with patch kit and sew kit. Pump wrapped in....something waterproof....and mount it at the same place (bottle cage). That should be good. I also carry a mini bungee or long Velcro strip to strap a lightweight shell or extra gloves to the handlebars.

    Thanks for all the suggestions, inputs, and pictures!

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    330
    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    Use the insulated cover for a camelbak tube? I carry a thermos of something hot when it's cold.
    The insulated covers help prolong the frozen tube headache. I don't ride in crazy cold but hiking in winter in some serious cold and the insulated tubes don't last long.

    There are no perfect products to cover all our needs but it's awesome to see so many new helpful ones come to the marketplace.
    2016 Remedy 9
    2016 Farley 7
    2017 Santa Cruz V-10 C
    2017 Remedy 9.9
    2017 Domane SLR 6

  21. #21
    Anytime. Anywhere.
    Reputation: Travis Bickle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,774
    I don't fat bike, or ride in very cold temps, but sometimes it's too cold to use a bottle cage. I don't have insulated bottles, so I put warm water in a regular bottle, and carry it in my SWAT bib pockets, under most of my clothes. I wear a base layer under the bib straps. The water never gets much colder than body temp, which is easier to drink when it's cold out. The OneUp EDC pump is sealed from the elements, and comes with a frame cage that mounts under a bottle cage. The head doubles as a CO2 inflator, and inside the 100cc pump, I can carry 2 x 20gm cartridges. Don't know if thats enough for a fat bike, but it will certainly cut down on pumping. I have a tube strapped under my saddle, wrapped in a nitrile glove to keep it clean.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

Similar Threads

  1. as i get older..car maintenence is less and less fun.
    By Boomchakabowwow in forum California - Norcal
    Replies: 67
    Last Post: 10-30-2017, 06:23 PM
  2. using a lumbar pack in addition to my hydration pack
    By androgen in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 09-20-2013, 12:19 PM
  3. Pack it in, Pack it out
    By Swell Guy in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 02-12-2012, 11:20 PM
  4. Pack In\Pack Out, spider trails on Somo
    By chollaball in forum Arizona
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 02-01-2012, 04:35 PM
  5. Creative ways to pack your hydration pack?
    By hatake in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: 02-01-2012, 01:44 AM

Members who have read this thread: 13

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.