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  1. #1
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    On-One Custom Build Post Ideas & Parts Selection

    Since the On-One seems to be a great starter Fatbike with a following here, I'm hoping some of you in-the-know can suggest parts selection ideas for this type of riding as follows:

    I have some hilly country where I live, so I want 2 chain-rings up front to deal with hill climbing. I'll need a really low granny gear(s). I will be doing some trail riding, again hilly, but I'm not into high skilled technical or dangerous landscapes prone to falling or injury to cross. I'm not a skilled rider focused on off-road danger zones or obstacle courses.

    I will have a chance to ride shorelines or the beach and try some sand dunes on vacations, but I do not live in snow country or near a beach. I will vacation in snow country, but I'm going to ride the easy trails that are not "dangerous for injury".

    This bike will be on pavement 70% of the time riding around for less than 10 mile round trips. It will go on bike paths and short off-road use with most rides too.

    I want quality parts that will last and be lower maintenance and function well too. I don't count saving grams or ounces of weight to be a priority vs quality and function, so I will spend more for durability, low maintenance, and high reliability. Overbuilt and stronger is better in my parts choice if higher quality too. Of course, if I can save 250+ grams or half a pound+ weight wise on a lighter part, then I'm interested to consider significant weight savings too. I want the best flat proof tire setup I can get. I hate getting flat tires.

    Starting with a bare On-One frame and fork what parts would you recommend to build this bike considering how it will be used given above?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    I think you're a good candidate for a complete bike, then just add front mech and shifter. A pugsley may for the bill as well. Either way, if you are not looking for a hardcore aggresive setup, and not looking for the lightest bike out there, then a complete will put a smile on your face for less $$$.

  3. #3
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    The pavement 70% of the time caught my eye. I use 27tpi Knard tires for one of my fatbikes that sees a fair amount of pavement mixed with easy trail riding. So far so good, have not seen much wear on them, bought them around October 2012. Wider than the Endomorphs, work well on most everything but not so sure on mud. Get tubes that have replaceable valve cores. Currently I'm using Q-Tube freeride ultra light tubes that are cheaper than the Surly fatty tubes. I put Stans in both bikes, but Slime would probably work better ( I seem to be lucky using the Stans, saved me many times). So far I've never got a flat with these tires. With Larry's, Endo's, and Hu-Du's I'm usually good for catching some large thorns every now and then. The weight of these tires is very acceptable also.

    I'd like to try the On-One "Shiggy/Floater" tires, looks like a great off-road tire, can't comment on pavement though.

  4. #4
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    The thing is such a sluggish bike in the first place because of the fat wheels/tires that I HIGHLY recommend a handlebar around 760-800mm. This allows you to stand and mash much easier, which is the only way to really get this thing up to speed. You have to use your body weight a lot to encourage it to start rolling, and those wide bars are extremely helpful for this.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    The thing is such a sluggish bike in the first place because of the fat wheels/tires that I HIGHLY recommend a handlebar around 760-800mm. This allows you to stand and mash much easier, which is the only way to really get this thing up to speed. You have to use your body weight a lot to encourage it to start rolling, and those wide bars are extremely helpful for this.
    Ok, handlebars should be 760-800mm for good leverage.

    Does anyone have some good handlebar brand model suggestions?

    Quote Originally Posted by 98srx6 View Post
    I think you're a good candidate for a complete bike, then just add front mech and shifter. [...] if you are not looking for a hardcore aggressive setup, and not looking for the lightest bike out there, then a complete will put a smile on your face for less $$$.
    I can get the rolling chassis version for about $650 that includes frame, fork, complete wheels, so that leaves me with about $700 extra to buy parts to break even with a completed On-One bike cost.

    So, continuing on the "customize it" theme with parts selection criteria given in the OP and a budget under 2K, which parts should I buy to complete the bike? That leaves about $1350 available for parts to complete this build.

    I want highest quality brakes with excellent stopping power. Overbuilt.

    I need a quality BB & 2 Chainring crankset. Maybe I could save some weight here & spend a bit extra, but I want long lasting durability too.

    I need a good shifting setup that is easy to maintain with high reliability & low maintenance with good range of gears ideal for hilly terrain.

    What headset would be best?

    Other recommendations for other parts?

    Thanks again for your ideas & suggestions.

  6. #6
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    I like On-One's Fleagle bar. It feels really good pointing straight down, for some reason. Was very low $ on the UK site.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by deVries View Post
    r

    Ok, handlebars should be 760-800mm for good leverage.

    Does anyone have some good handlebar brand model suggestions?
    There are quite a few. I have crank brother's carbon cobalt lowrise 780s on the fatbike, but I don't recommend them because the thickness of the bar seems different when comparing the front end to the back end. Good ole crank brothers quality control. My AM bike has a carbon 780mm lowrise answer pro-tapers, which are quite a bit heavier, but the carbon is thick and consistent around the ends. It's intended for abuse, but there are plenty of good bars in between these two in terms of price and quality.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by deVries View Post
    I have some hilly country where I live, so I want 2 chain-rings up front to deal with hill climbing. I'll need a really low granny gear(s). I will be doing some trail riding, again hilly, but I'm not into high skilled technical or dangerous landscapes prone to falling or injury to cross. I'm not a skilled rider focused on off-road danger zones or obstacle courses.
    Do you really need 2XX? While you need some low gearing you don't mention high, a lot of fatbikes are geared down quite a bit for there typical terrain and in my experience racing down a hill on road/pavement I find I will start spinning out but it's not by that much and the rolling resistance on the tires and current PSI is a contributing factor to how fast I could/can go downhill. Your extreme granny would put you at walking pace anyway. You might be better off dropping some weight off the bike tubeless/drill rims/1X10 and running some faster tires knards/black floyd instead of running a granny it's going to less maintenance and more reliable too.

    Disclaimer: I'm a really big advocate for 1XX setups, so go ride around without using the extreme high/low ends of your current gearing using a gear calculator Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Gear Calculator will give you a better idea as well. (FWIW I run an 11-32x32 and it's pretty damn hilly around here, the on-one has a 11-36T cassette and you could pick up a 30T front ring for yours adding quite a bit to the lower end.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Balogh View Post
    I'd like to try the On-One "Shiggy/Floater" tires, looks like a great off-road tire, can't comment on pavement though.
    Not a tire for pavement/road makes me think of driving a tractor on the highway where everyone is doing 100km/h and your top speed is capped at 30km/h.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by OFFcourse View Post


    Not a tire for pavement/road makes me think of driving a tractor on the highway where everyone is doing 100km/h and your top speed is capped at 30km/h.
    That's what i was thinking. I could use a good tire with a bit more traction in soft snow; seems the races I did last winter where I travelled to another end of my state I had issues getting the Husker Du's to hook up. Nates look a bit too much, thinking Floaters or Dillingers.

  10. #10
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    When you say you need them to hook up is it mostly an issue for the rear? We don't really have snow here.

    Edit: Were your hudu's quite worn?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by deVries View Post
    r

    Ok, handlebars should be 760-800mm for good leverage.

    Does anyone have some good handlebar brand model suggestions?



    I can get the rolling chassis version for about $650 that includes frame, fork, complete wheels, so that leaves me with about $700 extra to buy parts to break even with a completed On-One bike cost.

    So, continuing on the "customize it" theme with parts selection criteria given in the OP and a budget under 2K, which parts should I buy to complete the bike? That leaves about $1350 available for parts to complete this build.

    I want highest quality brakes with excellent stopping power. Overbuilt.

    I need a quality BB & 2 Chainring crankset. Maybe I could save some weight here & spend a bit extra, but I want long lasting durability too.

    I need a good shifting setup that is easy to maintain with high reliability & low maintenance with good range of gears ideal for hilly terrain.

    What headset would be best?

    Other recommendations for other parts?

    Thanks again for your ideas & suggestions.
    Based on what you are asking for,why not just buy the complete bike, sell the brakes and crankset, and use the $$ to purchase different models. As far as Brakes, Shimano Deore, SLX,XT or XTR is going to be an upgrade over the Elixir 1's, but the drivetrain that is on there is good stuff. On the other hand, if you want to build the bike up from scratch, there are several different ways you could go.

    For the headset, just get the Smoothie Mixer from On One. It is plenty good. I am almost finished with my rolling chassis build.......Crankset and front rotor should be here tomorrow. Just waiting now for my chainring to ship, and I am done......That is until Rock Shox releases their fork, or the On One Carbon fork.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by OFFcourse View Post
    When you say you need them to hook up is it mostly an issue for the rear? We don't really have snow here.

    Edit: Were your hudu's quite worn?
    No problem with the rear, the front washed out on me. I probably should have used a Larry, I've got a few of those. My Hu-Du's are holding up pretty well considering how much I've ridden them, in dirt, snow, sand, and even a gravel grinder that had too much road for my liking.

  13. #13
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    Maybe put a floater on the front they are too cheap not to try

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