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  1. #1
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    At odds with my Fat Bike

    Owned my Fat bike for about 3 months; put about 60 miles on it and am banging the crank arms on stuff all the time. As I get faster on the bike it is getting worse. 2 weeks ago I took a trip over the bars from hitting my crank arm on something. I know I could adapt my riding style to accommodate this but it is not my primary bike and I donít think I could change my riding style when switching bikes.

    But..I know I can get 170mm cranks at a decent price to replace the 175s that came on the bike. I have measured from the ground to the crank arm with crank in down position and it measured the same has my hard tail 29r. This tells me it is the width of the bb not the height that is the problem.


    My questions to the forum: Has anyone had success going shorter crank arms for more clearance? Any other suggestions?

    Donít want to give up too easy nor do I want to throw money at a hopeless situation. To complicate things even more the tires are the HORRIBLE Vee 8s so I know I need to spend $$$ on new tires.

  2. #2
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    I have a similar dilemma. Went from V Snowshoes to Maxxis Mammoth and must have lost a good inch in clearance with the smaller diameter.
    I now need shorter cranks, but maybe there's some room there for you, if looking for a tyre upgrade anyway, larger diam rubber ??<

  3. #3
    since 4/10/2009
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    1. You need to adapt. You will eventually adapt. The more you ride it, the faster that happens. Make it your primary bike for a couple months. You'll get it.
    2. Yeah, you can change parts, but riding it more won't necessarily cost you anything. And you can't really do anything about the extra width except adapt to it, or sell the bike. There are some REALLY tight spots where the extra bb and/or hub width just makes it impossible to squeeze through without whacking something. I've got crank boots and a taco bash guard on my bike, and I've put them to good use. I really wish I could find a replacement rear thru axle with the correct thread pitch that tightens down with a hex wrench so I could narrow up the rear end by about 10mm or so.

  4. #4
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    I've adapted. I go over the top rather than through obstacles.

    The fatbike makes it easier, and you have to forget skinny bike habits.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57ļ36' Highlands, Scotland

  5. #5
    Thingamejigger
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I really wish I could find a replacement rear thru axle with the correct thread pitch that tightens down with a hex wrench so I could narrow up the rear end by about 10mm or so.
    Have you seen these, Harold??

    https://robertaxleproject.com/shop/1...m-replacement/

  6. #6
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    As everyone points out, adapt. You're riding with a lot wider stance on the fatty, so that's quite different.

    That said though, shorter arms and a narrower q will make a lot of difference.
    If you run a raceface cinch crank (next sl or turbine) with a 170mm spindle and flipped chain wheel you'll get q202mm/q213mm.
    Depending on your bike, most likely that'll narrow your stance quite a bit.

    Also, most people might say 5mm shorter crank arms makes no difference, but I just swapped mine, and it helps a lot. I went -10mm q factor and 5mm shorter arms and I can now pedal through a lot of the same terrain that I used to get pedal strikes in.

  7. #7
    Thingamejigger
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    Anticipation and reading the trail is fairly simple.... I noticed the difference going to my new bike that had a wider BB and a 197mm rear, the first few months I had a similar experience, even although the BB drop was the same and the tyres were bigger I was hitting the BB.... I just rode as Harold suggests and I soon learnt half pedal and read when I corner.

  8. #8
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flying_Scotsman View Post
    I wasn't aware of those. Admittedly, it's been a number of months since I last looked, but that's exactly what I need. Too bad they're out of stock. Thanks.
    This probably won't give me 10mm, though. It's a slightly different design than some of the others I've seen, but it at least gets rid of the lever, which I honestly never need for the rear, anyway. It looks like it might only give me 5mm or so. But at least the head tapers more than the Maxle Lite so it'll slide off of impacts better, presumably.

  9. #9
    Rippin da fAt
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    Harold's trying to take an F350 Superduty through places that a Jeep is tight fitting!

    Flying_Scotsman, Thanks for sharing the link! My Mayor will be here this week and might benefit from one of those. Now having a tool to remove the wheel, not the end of the world.
    Get fAt, Stay fAt, Ride fAt
    Doctor recommended...

  10. #10
    Human Test Subject
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    I get way more pedal strikes on my fat bike than I do on my 29er, but I think I have a lower bottom bracket and my fat bike has 175mm cranks and I put 172.5s on my mtb.

    Get better tires. They'll be taller and they won't be vee 8s.
    You change your own flats? Support your LBS and pay them to instead.

  11. #11
    Rippin da fAt
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    One problem, and it is a problem is the absurdly low BB common to fatbikes. The problem can be compounded during cornering due to the "Q" factor. My 9:Zero:7 pedal strikes riding straight. It's a great bike with a lowering kit, so to speak and it's a deal breaker from my perspective. To have to pedal kick my way up a climb indicates I shoulda broke out my trials bike. The easy answer is go with the fattest tires you can stuff in your bike, secondly is to try a fork with a longer axle to crown to bring up the front end. Keep in mind that the longer fork can affect the caster angle of your bike and make it ride like a chopper.
    To offset the caster angle issue, a shorter rake is in order .

    Food for thought...
    Get fAt, Stay fAt, Ride fAt
    Doctor recommended...

  12. #12
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by BansheeRune View Post
    One problem, and it is a problem is the absurdly low BB common to fatbikes. The problem can be compounded during cornering due to the "Q" factor. My 9:Zero:7 pedal strikes riding straight. It's a great bike with a lowering kit, so to speak and it's a deal breaker from my perspective. To have to pedal kick my way up a climb indicates I shoulda broke out my trials bike. The easy answer is go with the fattest tires you can stuff in your bike, secondly is to try a fork with a longer axle to crown to bring up the front end. Keep in mind that the longer fork can affect the caster angle of your bike and make it ride like a chopper.
    To offset the caster angle issue, a shorter rake is in order .

    Food for thought...
    We want low bikes because getting over the bike in soft snow conditions is difficult, also when equipped with 4.8" tires, we don't want them to become sky-scrapers.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  13. #13
    Rippin da fAt
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    We want low bikes because getting over the bike in soft snow conditions is difficult, also when equipped with 4.8" tires, we don't want them to become sky-scrapers.
    That's fine and dandy when it when we get trails that are graded and are like a roadway. Unfortunately in the Rocky mountains that's not remotely an option. I have been a groomer operator for the snowmobile club for more than 15 years and there's great riding out there. It's not to be confused with a +120mm BB like todays trials bike. There should be sufficient clearance to ride my bike as a non-trials bike. Being a lowrider trying to go Jeepin just doesn't work.
    As for mounting a bike, tilt the bloody thing to the side and throw a leg over it and away ya go. Potato mashing shall require more than 4" fresh, just sayin.

    In no way am I trying to be sarcastic. I just need a bike to be rideable as an offroad purpose built rig. Constant pedal strikes due to a rolling trail is not fun, it's a chore. Of my 14 bikes, there is only one that is a lowrider, perfect for Van Nuys Blvd. on Wednesday night, but offroad, hmm...
    Get fAt, Stay fAt, Ride fAt
    Doctor recommended...

  14. #14
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    I understand, but this is a "nine-o-seven" bike. They know a thing or two about winter fat-biking and that's what they concentrate on. Again, in soft snow, it's not nearly as easy to get your booted foot up and over a frame, whilst the bike stands significantly higher than your feet, due to less weight. That's why the low stand-over. Most of the hazards in the winter are packed in with a lot of snow and ice IMO, filling in the gaps and making it easier to ride them, until you get enough snow where they basically go away. I know it's hard to make everyone happy, but I for one think that 907 bikes are a little more orientated towards winter riding with their lower BB and standover, as compared to some of the other fatbikes out there.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  15. #15
    turtles make me hot
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    I've ridden my 907's year round fat and 29+ and can't remember any crazy pedal strikes. Of course there have been some...
    There's a super rooty, rocky climb at my local trail that if I don't hit just right, I'll strike a little. When I'm on fat wheels, I run 4.8 Bud and 4.8 Knard. 29+ is Chupacabras on Velocity Duallys. Both pretty tall wheelsets. I run 180mm cranks.
    I like turtles

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