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  1. #1
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    Newbie questions.

    I have never ridden a fat bike before but I am pretty sure I want one. But how do they handle compared to a 29er? I ride a Trek Fuel ex7 now and I really like it so just curious on if there would be any similarities.

    I am a bigger guy, 250+lbs, so would I be better suited for a certain tire width?

    I would be riding in the wooded trails some and old railroad track type trails. I do like to tread lightly so that is part of the reason that a fat bike is appealing as well as being able to ride in the snow.

    Is there any bike that I should stay away from? Steel or Aluminum?

    Thanks for reading this far and any suggestions.

  2. #2
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    Fatbikes ride nothing like a 29er. Hard to compare. They are both fun in their own way and excel at different things.

    Sent from my SPH-D710 using Tapatalk

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fuzzwardo View Post
    I have never ridden a fat bike before but I am pretty sure I want one. But how do they handle compared to a 29er?...
    Different, but you will quickly adapt. Then your 29er will feel flighty.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  4. #4
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    I'm glad I own both. I love my fattie and 29er.

    Sent from my SPH-D710 using Tapatalk

  5. #5
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    Can I also ask some newb questions while we're here? Thanks.

    1. If you could have only ONE bike, would you take a fatty or non-fatty (26, 27.5, 29...)?
    2. Can someone explain how rim width and tire size are related? More specifically, how do those factors effect the footprint? And add in the PSI factor.

    Thanks!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timpanogos View Post
    Can I also ask some newb questions while we're here? Thanks.

    1. If you could have only ONE bike, would you take a fatty or non-fatty (26, 27.5, 29...)?
    2. Can someone explain how rim width and tire size are related? More specifically, how do those factors effect the footprint? And add in the PSI factor.

    Thanks!
    1. I only own one bike. The wife will only let me own one. It is a fattie. Pugsley. Sometimes I run 2.7 inch rubber on the LM rims in the summer, but mostly just run the fat rubber.

    2. I'll leave this answer to someone smarter than I. I know the wider the rim the wider it spreads the overall footprint of the tire, to an extent. Of course, the lower the pressure, the wider the footprint.

  7. #7
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    i have 20+ bikes and the only ones i ride are fatties

  8. #8
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    Re: Newbie questions.

    Fuzz, as someone who also owns a Fuel EX (9.5) and a Pugs i gotta say, just get the fatty. I ride both on the same terrain (except in winter) and both are a lot of fun for their own reasons.

  9. #9
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    Thanks guys. I guess I ll have to do some more research and see what I like. My local bike dealer carries Trek and can get Surly so I'll probably look that direction first.

    What bikes do you guys ride?

  10. #10
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    I've run a number of 29ers, rigid 1sp, full suspension, hardtail with suspension fork as well as 6" travel 26. The short answer is that a fattie rides like a fattie. I've had a Pugsley since model year one and ride it 80% of the time all year around. I've found that for traction uphill and down, and tight singletrack the fat bike rules over my other bikes. Top speed on technical descents can get sketchy but doable. I do sometimes miss suspension up front on rocky trail but the extra sensitivity up front in snow is worth the sore hands. The only place it can be a drag is road time to the trailhead and long, smooth, middle ring climbs. You're a big enough guy that flex in the frame and wheels will be noticeable no matter what you end up getting. Steel will flex more but springs back and can be more comfortable. Aluminum is generally stiffer, marginally lighter, and rougher ride. The bike geometry that fits best is the best way to go regardless of the material or brand. At my shop I fit fat bikes like a 29er hardtail.
    The standard 4" tire width will be good in all but the softest conditions and I have heard from those who have had both Pugs and Moonlander that for every soft day the Moonie was better, there was a mixed or wet day when biting in a little deeper was better. I'm a Specialized dealer and haven't seen a Fatboy in action yet but I like that it seems to be built with the idea of running either width tire.
    No matter what you choose, get it dirty and post a picture.

  11. #11
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    You like the idea of treading lightly so go with the biggest and therefore lightest impact available. Moonlander is what I chose for similar reason, 4.8 tires float across darn near everything.

  12. #12
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    The new fat bikes should be out soon and then try some especially as Trek and Specialized have one out. All the fat bikes are great. It's finding one you like that's important. My sister is getting her first fat bike and she's never ridden one before either. She's getting a Mukluk 3 and can't wait. If you decide a fat bike isn't for you, you will be able to sell it and get most of your money back.

    Aluminum rides stiff and after a 30 mile ride today I'm feeling it down into my bones but part of the trail was really rough for 4 miles as they'd taken the limestone gravel off. Steel has a soft feel to it and is more comfortable for long distances.

    I have two bikes, my Ridley cross bike and my Muk and no need for more. Each meets my needs in different circumstances. If I had to choose one, I'd keep my fattie as I'd never be able to afford to replace it.

    Wider tires/rims allow for more surface area/traction. The lower the psi, the more grip you have and less footprint as the pressure is spread out. If I'm riding paved or a limestone trail I run about 25 psi and on trails around 10. The ability to change the psi to the terrain makes riding so much more fun. No heavy bouncing on trails and better rolling on paved.

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