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  1. #1
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    Newbie looking for input/opinions!

    Hey guys, I am hoping some of you could give me some insight and steer me in the right direction.

    I am in the market for mountain bike and not sure which way to go. I am a marathon/ultra runner who blew his knee out in dec. After a few months on the couch my doctor gave me the okay to start biking so i was able to steal my buddies Salsa Mukluk and start riding in the snow. I always have wanted to get into biking but never have. I loved it. I am back to running now but would like to use this as a cross trainer and see where it goes from there.

    Anyways, long story short i am not sure exactly what i want. I live up north so we get a fair amount of snow. Also there is groomed fat tire bike trails near me. I live out in the country so the majority of my riding will be on gravel roads. Also, i will be riding on single track trails. I am definitely leaning towards a fat tire bike but am not sure if i just bought a hard tail if that would be fine for my gravel roads or would a fat tire be better. I would like to keep it under $1500.

    I have found a few bikes but am never quite sure. I have recently found a Salsa Bucksaw GX1 that i think would be perfect. I would be able to change out wheelsets to a 27.5 if i really wanted something different for the summer. Its a 2017 (used) and they want $1850 for it. Good deal?
    Sorry for the long post but hoping someone could help me out, thanks!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by theBANGER View Post
    [COLOR=#333333]...Anyways, long story short i am not sure exactly what i want. I live up north so we get a fair amount of snow. Also there is groomed fat tire bike trails near me. I live out in the country so the majority of my riding will be on gravel roads. Also, i will be riding on single track trails. I am definitely leaning towards a fat tire bike but am not sure if i just bought a hard tail if that would be fine for my gravel roads or would a fat tire be better...
    There's good news and there's bad news: there are so many choices now.

    As you're uncertain which you need, in your shoes I'd be tempted to get a frame that would take 26 fat, 27.5+ & 29er+ wheel sets. That way later you can add a wheelset that better meets your needs rather than have two bikes. Not sure you can do that for your budget.
    Or start with a good used 26 fat bike and see where you go.

    For winter use, try to determine if you need 4" or 5" tires; some find with the groomed trails in their area (trail/snow conditions), they only need 3".
    Find what people are using - or changing to - where you are (or intend to ride).
    26 fat has rim widths from 50 to 120mm, but many are finding that a 27.5 or 29er is much better for their summer use. How much dirt vs. rock. Climb/wet/dry: grip. Suspension. Are you a clyde. Fast or slow. And there's different hub widths.

    Take a look at the threads for putting 27.5 or 29er on fat frames, and take a look over at 26+/27.5+/29+ Plus Bikes - Mtbr.com.

    Summer is here. Grab a quality used 26 fat and ride, or start a lot of research.
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  3. #3
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    Fat bike with a couple different sets of wheels does it for me.
    I like turtles

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by NYrr496 View Post
    Fat bike with a couple different sets of wheels does it for me.
    Curious, 26 with narrower rim & rubber for summer or 27.5 or 29er?
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Curious, 26 with narrower rim & rubber for summer or 27.5 or 29er?
    26 and fat in the winter and 27.5/29 with a smaller tire in the summer.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by theBANGER View Post
    I am definitely leaning towards a fat tire bike but am not sure if i just bought a hard tail if that would be fine for my gravel roads or would a fat tire be better. I would like to keep it under $1500.
    I picked up a Cannondale Fat Caad in January, and it's become my favorite trail bike too. Still have the 4.8 JJ's and itĎs roughly 10% slower but a big grin. I haven't had real seat time on other fat bikes, but I find the Fat Caad geometry as agile as my other bikes.

    Newbie looking for input/opinions!-0f57bbe6-69a1-4869-912a-616fe4ea8af4.jpg
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  7. #7
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    Not sure I quite get your first post: You say you want to keep your expense under $1500, but the only bike you mention is $1850. There are many good fat bikes in the sub-$1500 range.

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Curious, 26 with narrower rim & rubber for summer or 27.5 or 29er?
    I have 26, 80mm rims with Bud and Lou for snow. I swap Lou for a 4.8 Knard when there's no snow. I have 100mm rims with Big at Larry for sand and pavement and I had a set of 29+ wheels with Bontrager Chupacabras for fast trails. I recently built a Surly Krampus so I don't use 29+ on the fat bike any more.
    I may build a pair of at 27.5 fat for it because I hear good things about it.
    Last edited by NYrr496; 3 Weeks Ago at 04:33 AM.
    I like turtles

  9. #9
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    Hoping to keep it under $1500. Willing to spend up to $2000 if need be.

  10. #10
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    I haven't seen if you've posted if you're clyde or not, fast or slow, etc..
    So I read your original post again.
    Without more about what type of riding you will do, it's hard for people to offer suggestions to narrow a selection down. But until you start riding a fat, you won't really know where you fit in?

    There are so many variables. Some people have had a fat bike they didn't like/enjoy, or even hated, only to change the tires and go "I love it!".

    I'm thinking:
    • you're not really going to know what you need/want until you have some fat experience under your belt. Anyone near you rent them?
    • get a good used fat bike in the $800 to $1,000 range and ride it for a year (some regions, the pickings are slim...), to see what you'd want improved. Then sell it and upgrade as an informed choice. Or your needs may be met by upgrading brakes, or gearing, or ____, and/or adding a wheelset.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  11. #11
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    Had to look up what a clyde is. Apparently a big person? Which i am not, at 5'10 155lbs. most of my riding will be gravel roads. I would say i am a fast/aggressive rider. The only bike ive ridden is a salsa mukluk that my buddy borrowed to me for a month. put on only about 150 miles. thats the only nice bike i have ridden. And half 1/4 of that was in snow. When i started this search i wasnt sure if i wanted a fat bike, now after thinking about it thats what im going to get. There is multiple fat races around me in the winter that i would like to do. And some of my riding is just in pastures. so i guess i have kinda made my mind on that. Is the full suspension Bucksaw a little overkill for a newbie?

  12. #12
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    dude....29+....Surly Krampus....end of search!!!

    3 bikes (or more) in 1!!

    I use mine in the snow, mud, regular single track, gravel roads, paved trails, skatepark and eventually (starting next year) bikepacking. The main reason I went with it was because of how versatile it is!! And also because I like fully rigid steel. It is simple to keep up for when I get more into bike packing (as my health allows me), and I grew up on BMX, so I don't like the feel of suspension other than in my arms and legs.

    I keep the same wheel/tire combo - the original 29+ set up of Rabbit Hole/Knards combo - and it has worked great for everything. I do plan on getting some tires that shed mud better here for the summer, but will keep the Knards for everything else.

    We don't get a deep of snow as you might - I live in Central Ohio - but it worked well this past winter for the few days we had "real" snow here. I think if we had more conditions like that I would go with a different tire for winter as well. Not neccesariyl wider, but different knob/tread pattern.

    When shopping around 4 years ago, I also looked at The Salsa Fargo; Trek Stache 9, Surly ECR (which I almost got), and the Surly Pugsley. In the end, I am glad I went with 29+ rather than full fat. Sounds like your riding situation will parallel mine except you will have better winters...
    "It's about having pointless fun in the woods...." - Walt
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  13. #13
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    funny you say that, the bike shop that has the used Bucksaw also has a used Krampus i was just looking at. i may have to explore that option, thanks

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by theBANGER View Post
    funny you say that, the bike shop that has the used Bucksaw also has a used Krampus i was just looking at. i may have to explore that option, thanks
    do it...if it is used, you should be able to get it in your price range. It is such a flexible frame set up. I have the original version - a 2015. I hear the new version is also the same with the addition new "boost" spacing.

    Where do you ride/live? Just curious about the terrain

    people tend to dismiss fully rigid as "too rough to handle", but like anything else, as you ride it, you will get used to it. I see fully rigid as the theme that people should start on, and then suspension is a variation on that theme. Probably because I grew up in the world before suspension was a legit thing for "common" folks...

    check out the Krampus thread as well for more info, pics etc...

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  15. #15
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    Only thing i worry about with the Krampus is not getting a 4" tire on it. I live in North Dakota. Quite a bit of snow but live within an hours drive of a great trail, the Maah Daah Hey trail. Not the type of terrain most people picture for ND. Theres actually a few 100+ miles races on it. Anyways, the bike is used and priced at $895.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by theBANGER View Post
    Only thing i worry about with the Krampus is not getting a 4" tire on it. I live in North Dakota. Quite a bit of snow but live within an hours drive of a great trail, the Maah Daah Hey trail. Not the type of terrain most people picture for ND. Theres actually a few 100+ miles races on it. Anyways, the bike is used and priced at $895.
    cool. I would love to have winter like you guys do!!!

    Yeah, true fat won't work on the Krampus, and with your snow totals, you will need 4" or 5" for sure

    ...check out Surly's site for their other options though...the Wednesday, and/or Pugsley might be some options...also the Ice Cream Truck?

    man, $895 for the K though...that is sweet I am glad that is in ND and not close to home here in C-bus, cause I could see myself skipping a mortgage payment to grab a second Krampus at that price...
    "It's about having pointless fun in the woods...." - Walt
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  17. #17
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    The bike is actually in South Dakota. Not much for used fat bikes in my area.

    On a different subject, Caps or VGK? I enjoyed watching Taylor Chorney when he was at UND so I keep tabs on the Blue Jackets a bit.

  18. #18
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    Im going to guess the VGK because of R. Smith and the fact that the Caps knocked out the CBJ?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by theBANGER View Post
    Im going to guess the VGK because of R. Smith and the fact that the Caps knocked out the CBJ?
    RE Caps/VGK:....I am sort of neutral actually. I am actually a Maple Leafs fan at heart...grew up following them as a child and until CBJ came along, then I added CBJ because I was one of the people who originally "fought" for hockey to come to C-bus back in the early 90's. But the Leafs will always be my first team....

    Wendell Clark and Borje Salming are my "idols". I have always worn #17 when I play b/c of Clark. It sucks that the Caps beat CBJ, but CBJ is not ready to go on to the next rounds yet...they are getting there I think. And the Caps beat the Penguins, who I absolutely can't stand...

    the Vegas thing has been surreal, so I guess it will be cool to see that history continue to happen...probably a nearly insurmountable achievement. And I really can't stand Ovechkin...but not as much as Crosby...

    I am a weird hockey fan for sure! One the Leafs and the Jackets were out, I was hoping for Boston actually...
    "It's about having pointless fun in the woods...." - Walt
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by theBANGER View Post
    • most of my riding will be gravel roads.
    • I would say i am a fast/aggressive rider.
    • ridden is a salsa mukluk ... for a month... about 150 miles ... half 1/4 of that was in snow.
    • multiple fat races around me in the winter that i would like to do. And some of my riding is just in pastures.
    • Is the full suspension Bucksaw a little overkill for a newbie?
    • Sounds like you've figured out you want/need fat. Find out what people are going to for those fat races: 26 4" or 5"? Rims mid or wide? (And I think there's 27.5 4" too.)
    • Pastures in winter you may want float: wide rim 26 5".
    • Prior to 27.5 and 29er, we'd debate between rims at 65mm or 80mm as the best compromise for running both summer vs winter rubber, or having two 26" wheelsets (65mm and 100mm).
    • My best guess is start with a fat frame and 26" able to go as wide as you want for those winter races and pastures. For your gravel and singletrack use, different rubber for that to start with, but as you get into it I bet that won't be enough given you like fast and aggressive. So it's reasonable to expect that at some point you're going to a different rim for that rubber to get the profile and behaviour you'd want, which means a different wheelset. At that point your considerations should seriously include a 27.5+ or 29er+ wheelset, which most riders prefer for summer use over 26 fat; so much so, the Fat Bikes forum use is down considerably.
    • For example, 26 fat has limits. I use 26 3.8" on 47mm rims for summer as that was what was available at the time. Don't go there. 'Works' at higher pressures, but at lower pressures I find it amusing to ride but it's so sloppy it's its own experience, as it feels like you're herding the bike balanced on top of the rubber. We're not talking self-steer, we're talking 'where are we going next'. Fun to take to bike meets and let people have a try. That's totally unlike the handling that you can get these days in a 27.5 or 29er wheelset.

    • I think you're going to have a world of fun!

    • I don't think you'll get as good an answer on your full suspension question as you'll get from reading threads and seeing which solutions worked for what situations that best match yours. But I would say don't let being a newbie steer you away from full suspension.
    • Some prefer fat for aggressive single track (accounts of passing others without it due to ease of flowing over a rough surface), for others it's full suspension fat. Then 29er and 27.5 entered the picture for more combinations.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  21. #21
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    No need for full (or really, even front) suspension on a fat bike ridden mostly on gravel roads. You are going to constantly run into your price barrier if you look in that direction, and you are unlikely to reap many benefits on your chosen terrain.
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtyHun View Post
    No need for full (or really, even front) suspension on a fat bike ridden mostly on gravel roads. You are going to constantly run into your price barrier if you look in that direction, and you are unlikely to reap many benefits on your chosen terrain.
    Singletrack
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  23. #23
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    He said gravel roads, as I recall.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtyHun View Post
    He said gravel roads, as I recall.
    Yup: majority.
    Also singletrack, pasture and winter fatbike races.
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  25. #25
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    Sure seems like regular ol' 26 Fat would do. Of course, I say that as a bit of an iconoclast: I ride 26 x 4.8 out in the desert on single and doubletrack, in washes, anywhere and everywhere and love it more than I ever loved skinny tires.
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtyHun View Post
    Sure seems like regular ol' 26 Fat would do. Of course, I say that as a bit of an iconoclast: I ride 26 x 4.8 out in the desert on single and doubletrack, in washes, anywhere and everywhere and love it more than I ever loved skinny tires.
    I wish! That's where I loved to hike; would love to ride.

    The 'fast & aggressive', 'singletrack' and 'races' reminds me of all of the different pros & cons of the various combinations of fat, rubber, rims, +, front & full. What's optimal is so dependent on the specifics of where, when and the rider.
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    I wish! That's where I loved to hike; would love to ride.

    The 'fast & aggressive', 'singletrack' and 'races' reminds me of all of the different pros & cons of the various combinations of fat, rubber, rims, +, front & full. What's optimal is so dependent on the specifics of where, when and the rider.
    Cheers, brother. I enjoy your posts.
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  28. #28
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    yeah...I could only imagine that rear squish would be a hinderance to most of that kind of riding, especially on fat

    and Canoe's posts are well done...I was also taking notes, and I already have my bike!!
    "It's about having pointless fun in the woods...." - Walt
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    ...and Canoe's posts are well done...I was also taking notes, and I already have my bike!!
    ha ha!
    I'm just repeating what I've learnt from those with a lot more experience than I, who've shared it on these forums. Search through the threads, there's some amazing info there.
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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    • ... So it's reasonable to expect that at some point you're going to a different rim for that rubber to get the profile and behaviour you'd want, which means a different wheel-set. At that point your considerations should seriously include a 27.5+ or 29er+ wheel-set, which most riders prefer for summer use over 26 fat; so much so, the Fat Bikes forum use is down considerably.
    Thinking about your needs got me interested in a 29er wheel-set for my fatbike. I'm more inclined to build my own wheels, just for the fun of it if nothing else, but I found some budget wheel-sets at a site listed in another thread, and some are hugely cheap. Turns out cheap is the right word; looking at the details, they are offering two types of wheel-sets: cheap with a freewheel hub and more expensive with a freehub.
    • Freehub means you can share the cassette gearing from your fat bike rear, if that gearing works for your riding (or get a different cassette that's optimal).
    • Freewheel is cheaper (it's what is on $200 fat bikes), but you also need to buy a freewheel (gears) - if available to match your derailer.
    • But the big issue between them is: the freewheel drive-side load is applied some distance inward from the axle end (see diagram), so the load is trying to bend the axle, and it can succeed (sometimes with as little as punching the pedal).

    So Be Warned: there are freewheel wheel-sets around out there.

    If you were just riding nicely along on your gravel roads, freewheel would likely do o.k. (if you could find a freewheel that worked with your derailer, and if you didn't mind riding out somewhat away from civilization while relying upon on a part that is of a quality typically found on a $200 to $400 bike to get you home ).

    Single track? Well, I'm thinking of your "fast & aggressive" and I'm not liking freewheel for your needs. Like hitting something in a pasture... I'd recommend staying with freehub for its strength & quality (~= reliability), and a much greater selection of quality cassettes available.

    Newbie looking for input/opinions!-freehub-vs.-freewheel-red-bearing.jpg

    (and I didn't even bother considering the quality of cheap rims, spokes, nipples, bearings... where and how you'll be riding, you want to know you can rely upon what you're rolling on - you don't want a wheel blowing apart and be facing a long hike back to town, or down time from your chosen training, let alone injuries!)
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  31. #31
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    Oh! (My evil twin makes me say) Have you looked at going tubeless?
    Try the Tubeless Tuesday thread. The easier methods (and accounts with recently available materials/versions/formulations) tend be near the end of the thread.
    Needed? Less so for a 29er wheel-set, but some consider tubeless essential for the fat.
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Thinking about your needs got me interested in a 29er wheel-set for my fatbike. I'm more inclined to build my own wheels, just for the fun of it if nothing else...
    I just completed a build to have a 29+ option:

    DT Swiss Big Ride Hubs -$310 F&R
    DT Swiss Competition Spokes & brass nipples - $70
    Stans Baron (i35) rims - $165 (Tree Fort price matched Outside Outfitters)
    35mm Kapton Tape - $10
    Valve Stems - in parts bin
    Terrenne McFlys $125 (ebay deal on one tire)
    Rotors - $65
    Cassette - $70

    $550 for a good set of wheels is not bad, but it does add up when you factor in tires, rotors and a cassette.

  33. #33
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    That's a pretty good deal, BCh! You laced them up yourself, I take it.
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  34. #34
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    Yes, I did lace them myself. It's only my 2nd set of wheels, with the first being Mulefut 80's and Hadley hubs. I will admit to taking the first one apart a couple times to get things right. I found Sheldon Brown's tips to be more useful than anything on Youtube.

    30 miles and so far all remains true. I did my best to even tension based on a Park tension meter (I know, not the most accurate).

    Sorry for the thread hijack.

  35. #35
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    I know many like the 27.5x4 option, but I have been doing really well with my fatbike. It came stock with 150/197 thru axles, 26x80mm rims, 4" tires, and 2x10 drivetrain. The drivetrain probably requires the least amount of discussion.
    However, I got to do a bike/tire demo, and 4.8" tires will allow you to make use of those mushy snow conditions that you might find in the shoulder seasons. I rode whenever I wanted this year, groomed or not, icy or not, mushy or not... There was never a reason to not ride, outside of personal motivation.
    I switched back to 4" tires for Summer. They are fun for off-road, but for any pavement I just cringed. But since the bike can also fit 29x3, I gave those a shot for Summer and they are pretty good. They are still a lot to haul around compared to 29x2.4, but light compared to 4", and, if nothing else, they are all-purpose.
    So I would try to sell you on thru-axles, and the ability to fit a range of wheels and tires.

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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    Yes, I did lace them myself. It's only my 2nd set of wheels, with the first being Mulefut 80's and Hadley hubs. I will admit to taking the first one apart a couple times to get things right. I found Sheldon Brown's tips to be more useful than anything on Youtube. ...Sorry for the thread hijack.
    Not really a hijack, as the OP may be considering/weighing that route as part of his solution.

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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    ...
    35mm Kapton Tape - $10 ...
    As in, the Kapton polyimide film tape I use on my electronic boards?
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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    As in, the Kapton polyimide film tape I use on my electronic boards?
    Ya a lot of us use it for tubeless tape instead of paying for bike branded stuff (or dealing with the disaster that is gorilla Tape). Kapton is the lightest and about easiest tape there is. Order width about equal to outer rim width or wider if you have a steady hand with an x-acto knife (trim after it's installed on the rim, done it several times myself). Don't pull too hard so you don't tear it. Best stuff for tubeless sets ups I've ever used, including on fat bike wheels.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    As in, the Kapton polyimide film tape I use on my electronic boards?
    As RAKC said, yes. I had heard about it's use on a road bike forum but had never tried it. I like RAKC's advice to select a width equal to the outter width of the rim.

    I have a roll of Tesa 4288 tape that I use for my road wheels and it is thicker than Kapton. I think it is the same as what Stans uses. I liked the thickness of that to cover the spoke holes and then the Kapton over it to seal the edges. I am sure a couple wraps of Kapton would do equally well. At $10 for 150 feet it is hard to beat.

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    I need to stop buying my Kapton at the local electronics store. $24.95 for 1/2" 30'.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    I need to stop buying my Kapton at the local electronics store. $24.95 for 1/2" 30'.
    eBay my friend.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RAKC Ind View Post
    Ya a lot of us use it for tubeless tape instead of paying for bike branded stuff (or dealing with the disaster that is gorilla Tape). Kapton is the lightest and about easiest tape there is. Order width about equal to outer rim width or wider if you have a steady hand with an x-acto knife (trim after it's installed on the rim, done it several times myself). Don't pull too hard so you don't tear it. Best stuff for tubeless sets ups I've ever used, including on fat bike wheels.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    Why is Gorilla tape a disaster, if I may ask? I used it on my first fat wheel set in January and seems to be doing OK with Duct Tape wrap first. That said, I had a strange fluke flat the other day when sitting overnight, but has held again since.
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeepRage View Post
    Why is Gorilla tape a disaster, if I may ask? I used it on my first fat wheel set in January and seems to be doing OK with Duct Tape wrap first. That said, I had a strange fluke flat the other day when sitting overnight, but has held again since.
    Sealant has been known to degrade Gorilla tape. Secondly, the adhesive is very good, which can make it a PITA to clean off the rim when replacing.

    I prefer Zip Flashing tape for fat rims. It is very durable, if a bit heavy. If light weight is your preference, Kapton tape can be had in a variety of widths and works well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    Sealant has been known to degrade Gorilla tape. Secondly, the adhesive is very good, which can make it a PITA to clean off the rim when replacing.

    I prefer Zip Flashing tape for fat rims. It is very durable, if a bit heavy. If light weight is your preference, Kapton tape can be had in a variety of widths and works well.
    I imagined tape residue would be a challenge with it, but shouldn't have to worry about that for a while. Hopefully I don't see degradation. Thanks
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeepRage View Post
    Why is Gorilla tape a disaster, if I may ask? ...
    Gorilla Tape has an extremely wide variance in its adhesion strength and in maintaining that adhesion. Quality tape manufactures publish their adhesion. (last checked a few years ago) Gorilla won't. Independent tests get widely varying numbers. Anecdotal evidence is all over the map. Unknown if this is due to different production facilities, wide production tolerance, bad batches, issues from storage/transit temperatures, shelf-life/product age, or a combination of these or other factors. While some get a roll that works fine in their conditions, people have had old product fail, new product fail, fail in the heat, fail in the cold, fail in dry, fail in wet, etc.; there is no common denominator other than they used Gorilla Tape. Some get a roll of Gorilla Tape from a different source and that roll works; for others it continues to fail.
    You won't know if you got a "good" roll until you use it...

    If you have a non-critical application for duct-tape, there's cheap tapes for that, with consistent performance. If you have a more important application for duct-tape, then there are quality tapes with various material thickness, tape strength and adhesion strengths, all published and verified.

    My personal use with it is that it fails in moderate heat, leaks adhesive and leaves a gummy mess. Buy a professional duct-tape for when you need it to work and you'll never go back.

    So we see the same variance when it was used for getto tubeless: for some it works, others it fails, some sooner than others. Everybody curses the cleanup.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

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    Thanks for all the input. I just put my name on a 2018 Specialized Fatboy. Its the rocket red/mint colored one with a carbon front fork. Brand new. Got it for $1500. Never have road one but seems to have great reviews. Plan on riding it as is for the first year then possibly building a 27.5+ wheelset for next year. And a bonus i was able to get a sweet deal on a Specialized 27.5 for the wife! Now i just have to wait 2 weeks to get them. Felt a little silly calling around asking for fat tire bikes. Most shops had them in their storage. Hope this bike will fit the bill.

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    cool...now get out there and get it dirty!!! The first couple months with the new bike will be super addictive in the best way! Keep us in the loop with pics and stuff
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    Not sure if I should start a new thread but now Iíve got more questions....
    Will the bike come with pedals? Should I buy specific shoes for biking like clip less shoes? Any specific maintenance items/lubes/tools I should get right away

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    Quote Originally Posted by theBANGER View Post
    Not sure if I should start a new thread but now Iíve got more questions....
    Will the bike come with pedals? Should I buy specific shoes for biking like clip less shoes? Any specific maintenance items/lubes/tools I should get right away
    It will not come with pedals. You have to decide if flats or clipless will be your platform. I have both and they both have their roles. Clipless is my usual pedal but they would require some serious winter riding shoes that can be pricey. Clipless can be tricky when riding in icy conditions. The flats allow you to wear whatever winter boots you want which is a plus however, you lose that locked in feeling which helps me with pulling up on my pedals for more power.
    Iíd get both honestly....
    I would convert to tubeless if your tire/rim combo will take it. Lose 2 lb immediately and save on tubes, many benefits actually. Get some good summer and winter lube, a pressure gauge that reads very low pressures, and a multi tool is a must. Some brand of bladder pack too like Camelbak. Others on here will add to this but feel free to PM with more questions. I also live in the north and winter bike, many other things you could use for winter comfort..

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    Ok sounds. Good. Iíve already got a huydration vest and what not so Iíll be good there. The rims say tubeless ready so I was actually going to call the shop and just see if they could do the tubeless thing beings Iím unaware how to. Depending on what they charge to do it anyway

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    Tubeless is awesome. I have it on all of my bikes and I havenít had a flat in many years. Your bike will lighten up surprisingly well too.
    Itís a must do in my opinion. The price has come down quite a bit for the shop to do it these days, maybe $80? Cheaper yourself of course if you choose to dabble. I did not choose to lol..

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    To do tubeless yourself it will cost ~$40 in materials if you shop around. The advantage of doing it yourself is that you will learn the process and then you will have some extra tape and sealant on hand. The key to getting it done for $40 is the tape. You can spend $25 for tape marketed toward fat tubeless that will do one set of wheels, or you can buy 80mm Kapton tape for $10 and have enough for 6-7 sets of wheels. https://www.ebay.com/itm/80mm-8cm-x-...-/201373286993

    It helps to have an air compressor.

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    Iíll look into the DYI method. As long as I can find a video showing what to do I should be able to do it. Iíve got an air compressor and about any tool i would need I would imagine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theBANGER View Post
    The rims say tubeless ready so I was actually going to call the shop and just see if they could do the tubeless thing beings Iím unaware how to. Depending on what they charge to do it anyway
    Go for it yourself. I did my first set a few weeks ago with FattyStripper, Orange valves, and 2oz of Orange sealant per wheel. Got it the first time.
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    Quote Originally Posted by theBANGER View Post
    ... The rims say tubeless ready so I was actually going to call the shop and just see if they could do the tubeless thing beings Iím unaware how to. Depending on what they charge to do it anyway
    Get your bikes, get them tuned, running and enjoy the summer's riding. Then look at tubeless (weekend that's too rainy to ride?).
    If it will be some time before you get the bikes, start your research. Start with finding those who have done it with your rims (most important), then with your tires (less important, but sometimes a surprise - always leaks with ____ sealant).

    There are some areas with thorns where it doesn't make sense to try to ride unless you are tubeless, or like patching or changing tubes a number of times times an hour. Some people get really really good at it; they don't seem to be as impressed with that as the rest of us are.

    Apart from thorns, losing the weight is nice, but removing the tube from the deform/reform of the contact patch makes for less rolling resistance and better conforming to gripping the surface. Different surfaces, conditions and riding style results in a different emphasis of the mix of benefits.

    Different sealants work, well, differently. Some have a poor track record in some conditions. Some that used to be good changed something (no we didn't!) and don't work as well now. Do your research.
    There are DIY formulas/brews too, allowing you to save money and control what goes into it. For example, early on glitter seemed to be popular; now it's not considered as effective as it used to; and some say we shouldn't be leaving it on the trail behind us as the sealant flows to seal punctures/leaks, even if it has a Hansel & Gretel benefit for finding your way home.

    There are a number of ways to do tubeless. Depending on how 'tubeless ready' the rims are, it could be very trivial.

    There's so many ways to do tubeless, don't try to learn it here, go to the tubeless threads, like Tubeless Tuesday. As knowledge and formulations have changed over the years, start from the most recent posts and work backwards. And, some of these threads are huge.

    Most tubeless people have 'their correct way', but there are several 'correct ways'. Watch out for 'holier than thou' info.

    Some tires are 'tubeless friendly' too, whereas some will use some of the sealant sealing the casing. Some casings with some sealants will weep sealant for some time, or seemingly forever. See the threads.

    And no matter how much you research, there's always something more/new. Like choosing a bike, at some point you have to make a choice and go for it. Having tubeless ready rims will make that a lot easier.
    (I can't believe that with all of the weeks I've put into tubeless and formula research that I have no recollection of seeing Kapton... how?)
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

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    I learned about Kapton tape from the sister Road Bike Review. I never tried it until I built some plus wheels and needed some tape to fit i35 rims. It set up well. If it can resist 100psi of road tire pressure, mountain and fatty pressures should be nothing for it. We shall see if it is as durable as my other go to, Zip Flashing tape.

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    probably goes without saying, but get a good helmet first....


    then try tubeless etc. BUT, you don't need to go tubeless right away. Unless you are headed directly into cactus country, I would just ride first. Honestly, i have been riding for 40+ years, and have NEVER gone tubeless...AND, I have never had a flat while out riding...never. Again, i ride in Central Ohio, so there only thing I have to worry about id hawthorns and glass on the paved trails and roads. I also have to watch for pinch flats, but that has never happened to me on the trail.

    I know I will try tubeless when I start bike packing more, but for now...

    as far as pedals, I have never run clipless...have always ridden flat. Again, my choice...I don't think it is "right or wrong". I have never seen the need to switch over, and I do not like the feel of my feet permanently attached to the pedals (for a minute, I tried those old school pedals that you strapped your toes in back in the early 90's).
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    Sounds good, thanks for tips. Ill wait on the tubless, would be interesting to see the difference anyways. We are picking them up and heading straight for a weekend of ridding in a different state so wont be home with them for awhile. Having second thoughts about spending so much on a bike when this will be my first bike since middle school. Looked into the Fatboy SE but looks to be a lot less of a bike compared to the base model. I have an addictive personality so i would i imagine this will not be any different. For instance, i started running two years ago in June, ran 1/2 marathon in September, ran a full marathon 6 months later and paced a friend in a 100 mile trail race 2 months after my first marathon. i then started training for a 50 milers. All within a year. I could definitely see this going the same direction!

    Anyways, i plan on just getting flat pedals, a few tools and lubricants, a good helmet and possibly a tailgate blanket. Then a trailer to pull the little ones behind me. This sport is getting to be expensive, just like everything else i seem to be in to!

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    Quote Originally Posted by theBANGER View Post
    Sounds good, thanks for tips. Ill wait on the tubless, would be interesting to see the difference anyways. We are picking them up and heading straight for a weekend of ridding in a different state so wont be home with them for awhile. Having second thoughts about spending so much on a bike when this will be my first bike since middle school. Looked into the Fatboy SE but looks to be a lot less of a bike compared to the base model. I have an addictive personality so i would i imagine this will not be any different. For instance, i started running two years ago in June, ran 1/2 marathon in September, ran a full marathon 6 months later and paced a friend in a 100 mile trail race 2 months after my first marathon. i then started training for a 50 milers. All within a year. I could definitely see this going the same direction!

    Anyways, i plan on just getting flat pedals, a few tools and lubricants, a good helmet and possibly a tailgate blanket. Then a trailer to pull the little ones behind me. This sport is getting to be expensive, just like everything else i seem to be in to!
    When you get your first flat where the tube isnít repairable at $10-$18 per tube you will be wishing you went tubeless immediately. I wouldnít leave the shop with a new bike without converting to tubeless. Have not had a flat in 7 years! Yes, itís just an opinion, but itís a strong opinion lol..

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    I ride a fat bike just about everywhere, but mostly on the street. I fitted a set of Duro Fleetwood 26x4.00 semi-slick tires, which do great on the street and very nicely on gravel and rougher stuff to the limits of my interest in riding there.

    My bike was a new-in-the-box leftover 2017 Specialized Fatboy Comp Carbon ... not counting all the additional stuff I added/changed/configured it with, it cost me $2000. adding my preferred seat, the tires, and a better set of grips, it would have been $2150. Just that would have been fine for most things.

    I did other, useful, functional things that satisfy me (like upgraded brakes, upgraded derailleur, 11-spd cassette, and shifter, a slightly shorter stem, etc). Unnecessary, but the bike works great: gearing is right on the money, handling and stopping are perfect. And it's very comfortable.

    I did not convert it to tubeless or any such nonsense as that: That stuff would be an utter waste of time and money for my riding. At almost a thousand miles into owning and riding this bike every day, I have as yet not had a single flat.

    My best advice to you: Find a bike that you like, buy it, and ride it a lot. You'll know better what works for you, and what doesn't, a thousand miles or so later.

    G

  61. #61
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    G doesn't ride off road or on hardcore terrain, so his crusade against tubeless is based on a lack of understanding regarding why tubeless is absolutely the way to go if you will be doing more than street riding. Beyond the issue of flats is the ability to air down tubeless tires much more effectively than tubed ones. We won't even go into the increased efficiency and feel tubeless brings about.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtyHun View Post
    G doesn't ride off road or on hardcore terrain, so his crusade against tubeless is based on a lack of understanding regarding why tubeless is absolutely the way to go if you will be doing more than street riding. Beyond the issue of flats is the ability to air down tubeless tires much more effectively than tubed ones. We won't even go into the increased efficiency and feel tubeless brings about.
    Thanks for clarifying my recommendation, wasnít quite sure how to respond.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theBANGER View Post
    Sounds good, thanks for tips. Ill wait on the tubless, would be interesting to see the difference anyways. We are picking them up and heading straight for a weekend of ridding in a different state so wont be home with them for awhile. Having second thoughts about spending so much on a bike when this will be my first bike since middle school. Looked into the Fatboy SE but looks to be a lot less of a bike compared to the base model. I have an addictive personality so i would i imagine this will not be any different. For instance, i started running two years ago in June, ran 1/2 marathon in September, ran a full marathon 6 months later and paced a friend in a 100 mile trail race 2 months after my first marathon. i then started training for a 50 milers. All within a year. I could definitely see this going the same direction!

    Anyways, i plan on just getting flat pedals, a few tools and lubricants, a good helmet and possibly a tailgate blanket. Then a trailer to pull the little ones behind me. This sport is getting to be expensive, just like everything else i seem to be in to!
    It will only be as expensive as you let get...but also remember that sometimes "Cutting corners" can lead you to spending twice as much in the end. Don't commit to huge upgrades until you know how you are going to ride ,and how often, and where your home trails will be. I got my Krampus 3 years ago, and have now only recently started to figure out what I want to upgrade. NONE of my rides have ever been bad because i did not have the latest trends and fashions on my bike or my body.

    Spend money on stuff that will make YOU want to get on it...sounds like some of that is panning out!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrGT View Post
    Thanks for clarifying my recommendation, wasnít quite sure how to respond.
    I take it you didn't notice that was G, not MrGT.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    I take it you didn't notice that was G, not MrGT.
    LoL-he probably didn't, but I was agreeing with him and disagreeing with G (ramarren).
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrGT View Post
    Thanks for clarifying my recommendation, wasnít quite sure how to respond.
    MrGT,

    I have no idiotic "crusade against tubeless" as that jerk likes to say about me. I said, quite explicitly, that it is "an utter waste of time and money for my riding". Emphasis on "my riding." There was no need for you to respond to my post for the OP.

    I've done all the research about tubeless, including discussing it with the folks who do the most mountain bike competition and racing setup in the area, as well as discussing it with many off-roader bikers in my neighborhood here. All of them agree 100% with my evaluation.

    My response to DH is: " ". He's not worth responding to.

    It seems to me that for the purposes of the OP ... which is not hardcore off-road stuff, but more training and such for his running and injury recovery: "I want to use it as a cross trainer and see where it goes from there." ... that my kind of usage is a much closer fit than all that hardcore stuff, since that is a part of what I use my bicycles for... and very successfully, I might add.

    G

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    Now, now, ramarren: You tend to stick your neck out, and you have found more than once in the recent past that your "experience" riding a fat bike solely on the road does not have any bearing on the usual terrain that folks on mtbr (it stands for Mountain Bike Rider, BTW) ride. The OP is not looking for your misguided advice about tubeless. He plans to ride off road, not around city streets. Your usual fluff comments about tubeless being "nonsense" or a "cult" have brought the considered opinions of those who actually ride mountain bikes off road (and who, consequently have experience with terrain that causes flats) to bear on the ignorance of your thoughts on the matter.
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    I agree with both DirtyHun and ramarren: (to a point)

    Tubeless has it's place.

    You might want to run tubeless if:

    1.) You ride off road or rough roads
    2.) You ride pressures low enough to cause pinch flats
    3.) Efficiency of pedaling is important
    4.) You don't mind setting up tires tubeless (not hard), or are willing to pay to have it done.
    5.) You ride in a thorny area that will easily puncture a tire/tube combo.

    You may want to ride tubes if:
    1.) Your rims are not well suited for tubeless. If tubeless fails when you air down then one of the benefits is defeated.
    2.) If you do not have the tools and/or ability to setup tubeless and swap tires, then run a tube.
    3.) If you are a casual rider that just wants to pump up the tires once every 3 months a go for a ride, stick with tubes.

    I have found after riding both methods extensively that tubeless works best for me on all my road bikes, 29+ and fat bikes. I would recommend it to avid cyclists.

    For my wife and kids that largely noodle on muni trails and neighborhood streets, tubes work just fine, if sub-optimal.

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    Well said, BC.

    I made the switch to tubeless about six months into getting a fat bike, after three flats in two weeks, one due to a snakebite, two due to cactus. Here in Arizona, if one rides off the road, tubeless is essential.

    It was pretty easy to set the wheels up tubeless, but then, I went split tube. Never going back to tubes!
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    I agree with both DirtyHun and ramarren: (to a point)

    Tubeless has it's place.

    You might want to run tubeless if:

    1.) You ride off road or rough roads
    2.) You ride pressures low enough to cause pinch flats
    3.) Efficiency of pedaling is important
    4.) You don't mind setting up tires tubeless (not hard), or are willing to pay to have it done.
    5.) You ride in a thorny area that will easily puncture a tire/tube combo.

    You may want to ride tubes if:
    1.) Your rims are not well suited for tubeless. If tubeless fails when you air down then one of the benefits is defeated.
    2.) If you do not have the tools and/or ability to setup tubeless and swap tires, then run a tube.
    3.) If you are a casual rider that just wants to pump up the tires once every 3 months a go for a ride, stick with tubes.

    I have found after riding both methods extensively that tubeless works best for me on all my road bikes, 29+ and fat bikes. I would recommend it to avid cyclists.

    For my wife and kids that largely noodle on muni trails and neighborhood streets, tubes work just fine, if sub-optimal.
    ...and now counterpoint:

    FOR ME...I run with tubes while I:

    1.) ride off road or rough roads
    2.) ride pressures low enough to cause pinch flats
    3.) Efficiency of pedaling is important
    4.) n/a
    5.) You ride in a thorny area that will easily puncture a tire/tube combo.

    I am an avid cyclist who rides 29+ only, in both the winter and summer (and BMX when I am not on the MTB) I run between 15-17psi on regular surfaces, and between 8-10 psi on sand and snow with Surly Knards on Rabbit Hole rims. I also ride paved multi-use trails and commute on my Krampus. Tires still at the 15-17 mark for this as well.

    I have never had a flat while on the trail...in 40+ years of using tubes (it will probably now happen this weekend). I have experienced flats after getting home...usually hours later or the next day due to thorns, glass, or pinch's.

    I don't think tubeless is a necessity. I think it is a great option, but it will not be a hinderance to anyone riding, especially in their first year.

    I am not against tubeless...in fact, I plan to do it when I head out on my first long bike packing trips in the coming years, but using tubes has NEVER been a detriment to my riding.

    I still feel like there is a HUGE inference in the activity that people who ride with tubes are "not serious" or noobs, or stupid, or are a joke, or don't understand the activity...not true.

    Again, I would tell the OP to focus on riding fundamentals, bike fit, and safety first.
    "It's about having pointless fun in the woods...." - Walt
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  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    ...
    I still feel like there is a HUGE inference in the activity that people who ride with tubes are "not serious" or noobs, or stupid, or are a joke, or don't understand the activity...not true.

    Again, I would tell the OP to focus on riding fundamentals, bike fit, and safety first.
    Exactly. I take serious issue with the notion that one has to advise a newbie that they "MUST DO" something that is not even fully supported by any bicycle manufacturer at all yet. That's just idiocy and prejudice in my book.

    In another area of my expertise, it would be like telling a person interested in photography that they must spend at least $5000 on a fancy top of the line camera to make a good photograph. Nothing could be further from the truth. It's all pure hubris on the part of simple-minded jerks who want to prove that they are better than someone else.

    There is, of course, great value in tubeless tires for certain purposes and uses. If there wasn't, I would not have spent nearly $4000 upgrading my motorcycle's wheels and tires to more modern, tubeless specification and radial construction types.

    But, to date, there is little to no advantage for my bicycle or my riding needs, and certainly not at the installation and maintenance burden required. My bike is optimized for my uses with tires that already minimize rolling resistance and noise, are lighter by a healthy percentage than the pure off-road tires, and are designed for higher pressures in use (15-30 psi range; I run 25 psi which seems optimum). I ride on the street mostly ... but also on gravel, packed dirt, and occasionally softer, nastier stuff when that's on the way to where I want to go. The bike has handled all of it with no problems, and with no flats or punctures.

    Your advice to the OP to focus on riding fundamentals, bike fit, and safety first is absolutely right on the mark, and goes right along with my recommendation to "Find a bike that you like, buy it, and ride it a lot."

    onwards,
    G

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post

    I still feel like there is a HUGE inference in the activity that people who ride with tubes are "not serious" or noobs, or stupid, or are a joke, or don't understand the activity...not true.
    1.) I said tubeless has it's place
    2.) Under both scenarios I said "might want to" or "may want to". Conversely one "might not want to" is equally true.
    3.) I would recommend it for avid riders. I would not recommend that casual riders go tubeless. Neither of those statements infer that a person riding tubes is " 'not serious' or noobs, or stupid, or are a joke, or don't understand the activity. An avid rider "might consider" tubeless and decide not to do it for whatever reason.

    I too rode for 40 years on tubes with no detriment (at that time). I have ridden tubeless for about 5-6 years. Going back to tubes now I would see the following detriments:

    a.) Inability to run lower pressures (particularly on the road bike) which improves comfort and traction.
    b.) Riding in areas with puncture vines (goat heads) would require going back to heavy tire liners in lieu of sealant.
    c.) Overall weight of the system. Weight is not huge on a road bike, but 1.5 to 2 pounds on a fatty is significant.

  73. #73
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    I took issue with ramarren giving advice to off road folks about tubeless, when he has never used it nor does he ride on surfaces such as the OP advertised. I'm not saying that tubes aren't simpler, because they are dirt simple and ideal for folks who don't want to fuss with stuff. The beauty of tubeless lies not in its set-up, which is more labor and time intensive, but in its reduction in downtime during riding, and, as someone who rides the fat bike exclusively off road, I say it is absolutely worth it.

    The whole argument about newbies not being able to manage tubeless is pure rubbish. How much you ride doesn't dictate your mechanical abilities.
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  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by ramarren View Post
    Exactly. I take serious issue with the notion that one has to advise a newbie that they "MUST DO" something that is not even fully supported by any bicycle manufacturer at all yet. That's just idiocy and prejudice in my book.

    G
    hy∑poc∑ri∑sy
    həˈpškrəsē/
    noun
    noun: hypocrisy; plural noun: hypocrisies

    the practice of claiming to have moral standards or beliefs to which one's own behavior does not conform; pretense.

    Dude, you are the one proclaiming that tubeless is a cult. Who said "MUST"?

    As far as manufacturer support, Trek (Bontrager) and Specialized both make and market tubeless ready rims and tires, so I am not sure how the technology is not supported. Most major tire manufactures make tubeless ready tires. Mavic, HED, Stans, Sun Ringle, DTSwiss and countless other wheel/rim manufactures make tubeless ready rims. Cost and sealant maintenance are the primary reasons bike manufacturers/shops do not install tubeless right out of the box and leave it to the end user to upgrade. They certainly provide all the support and materials to make the change.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtyHun View Post
    I took issue with ramarren giving advice to off road folks about tubeless, when he has never used it nor does he ride on surfaces such as the OP advertised. I'm not saying that tubes aren't simpler, because they are dirt simple and ideal for folks who don't want to fuss with stuff. The beauty of tubeless lies not in its set-up, which is more labor and time intensive, but in its reduction in downtime during riding, and, as someone who rides the fat bike exclusively off road, I say it is absolutely worth it.

    The whole argument about newbies not being able to manage tubeless is pure rubbish. How much you ride doesn't dictate your mechanical abilities.
    My reason for not recommending it to casual riders is due to sealant maintenance. Could one do it? Sure. Is is worth it, not in my opinion. My wife, son and daughter all have bikes. None are tubeless. For the the 30-50 miles they may put on the bikes in a year it is just not worth it.

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    hy∑poc∑ri∑sy
    həˈpškrəsē/
    noun
    noun: hypocrisy; plural noun: hypocrisies

    the practice of claiming to have moral standards or beliefs to which one's own behavior does not conform; pretense.

    Dude, you are the one proclaiming that tubeless is a cult. Who said "MUST"?

    As far as manufacturer support, Trek (Bontrager) and Specialized both make and market tubeless ready rims and tires, so I am not sure how the technology is not supported. Most major tire manufactures make tubeless ready tires. Mavic, HED, Stans, Sun Ringle, DTSwiss and countless other wheel/rim manufactures make tubeless ready rims. Cost and sealant maintenance are the primary reasons bike manufacturers/shops do not install tubeless right out of the box and leave it to the end user to upgrade. They certainly provide all the support and materials to make the change.
    Don't give me your mantra, sweetums.

    i'm not proclaiming any such thing, other than that saying OR implying that one MUST fit tubeless tires or one is clueless, ignorant, and all that other bullshit is abhorrent stupidity.

    Please send me the manufacturer's listing of a fat bike sold with tubeless tires and rims from the dealer. I haven't found one yet, and I've looked and looked. Not one. Saying something is "tubeless ready" and actually supplying tubeless tires on the product are very different things.

    And you said it yourself: cost and sealant maintenance go up with tubeless tires. Saying that this is why a dealer would leave it to the user, when many of these users are spending $4000 and more for a bicycle, and many never turn a wrench on their own, is ridiculous ... are the costs REALLY that high and the maintenance THAT difficult? Why should a newbie to the bicycling world have to want tubeless tires and take on all that burden just to get your approval? It's just EffinG Nonsense.

    Enjoy your hypocrisy. I feel sorry for newbies who come to this forum for advice.

    G

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    Quote Originally Posted by theBANGER View Post
    Not sure if I should start a new thread but now Iíve got more questions....
    Will the bike come with pedals? Should I buy specific shoes for biking like clip less shoes? Any specific maintenance items/lubes/tools I should get right away
    As far as I'm aware, any bicycle delivered by a dealer will have pedals fitted prior to delivery. They may be crap pedals, or you may pay extra for them, but they'll be there.

    My bike came with crap pedals supplied by Specialized in the crate. I tossed them before I rode out of the shop, and selected a nice set of SKAMP flats. These have little protrusions that sink into shoes with soft outer soles and keep your foot from sliding around. Clips and clip equipped shoes can be a good aid on getting power to the pedals, but they take a bit more effort to learn how to use best.

    I've been using a pair of regular Skecher shoes that fit my feet well and are comfortable to both bike and walk in. They're not ideal, but they're worked well for a year and more. When they wear out, I'll probably buy some nicer bicycle oriented shoes. No rush.

    A few small hand tools is all you should need for casual maintenance. Wait until you get your bike and then pick the tools that fit commonly used bolts, nuts, etc on that bike. Wait on everything else, or ask the mechanic at the shop when you buy the bike, what they'd recommend for lube and other stuff. There's really not much needed unless you plan to learn the art of bicycle mechanics and do all your maintenance yourself.

    The one essential I'd recommend is a high quality tire pressure gauge for the pressure range of the tires your bike has, as well as a good tire pump suited to the volume of the tires on the bike you buy. Fat bikes are very sensitive to tire pressure settings and most generic tire pressure gauges are not accurate enough in the 5 to 30 psi range to be useful.

    I bought an Accupressure bourdon-tube type pressure gauge, which is accurate to +/-0.3 psi in the 0-30 psi range; it cost me $23. For a pump, I bought a RYOBI battery operated compressor, which can supply pressure up to 150 psi. I use it for my bicycles, motorcycle, and automobile; it cost me $100. It's a good bit of overkill for the bicycles, but makes checking and inflating the tires a three minute, painless job.

    The other usual stuff (tire levers, patch or plug kit, small multitool, etc) are easy.

    If you ever park your bike and leave it for a few minutes, a good lock is essential. "There is no faster moving vehicle than an unlocked and unattended bicycle." Sad, but true. There are a lot of different kinds of locks on the market. I'm using an OTTOlock, which is light, strong, and gives a reasonable measure of security for casual parking when I stop to use a bathroom or get a drink. There are plenty of others.

    G

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by ramarren View Post
    Don't give me your mantra, sweetums.

    i'm not proclaiming any such thing, other than that saying OR implying that one MUST fit tubeless tires or one is clueless, ignorant, and all that other bullshit is abhorrent stupidity.

    Please send me the manufacturer's listing of a fat bike sold with tubeless tires and rims from the dealer. I haven't found one yet, and I've looked and looked. Not one. Saying something is "tubeless ready" and actually supplying tubeless tires on the product are very different things.

    And you said it yourself: cost and sealant maintenance go up with tubeless tires. Saying that this is why a dealer would leave it to the user, when many of these users are spending $4000 and more for a bicycle, and many never turn a wrench on their own, is ridiculous ... are the costs REALLY that high and the maintenance THAT difficult? Why should a newbie to the bicycling world have to want tubeless tires and take on all that burden just to get your approval? It's just EffinG Nonsense.

    Enjoy your hypocrisy. I feel sorry for newbies who come to this forum for advice.

    G
    We sure get to enjoy yours, ramarren. Your advice has low value for mountain bikers.

    BTW, since you are a roadie, here is the brochure. They don't ship with sealant, but they do ship fully ready.

    https://www.giant-bicycles.com/globa...ubeless-system
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    Wow did this blow up holy crap. I regret making any replies at all! I said in my reply that it was an OPINION, we all have opinions, I gave advice based on MY experience although it has also been all of my fellow riders experiences too. This forum isnít very different from Facebook at this point. Iím not interested in defending my position and getting into verbal assaults over it. Good luck to the OP whatever they decide, Iím done with this thread. Iím not even sure why I was attacked at this point. Disappointing...

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    Ya this one got out of hand. I see the whole tubeless subject is something that everyone has a strong opinion on. I am just going to talk to the bike dealer and see what he says. The closest paved road to me is 4 miles away. So ill be riding almost all dirt roads, pastures, cattle trails and then single track trails. So im leaning towards the tubeless but i may let the dealer decide that for me. Thanks for some of the input, one week away from getting it. Cant wait.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theBANGER View Post
    Ya this one got out of hand. I see the whole tubeless subject is something that everyone has a strong opinion on. I am just going to talk to the bike dealer and see what he says. The closest paved road to me is 4 miles away. So ill be riding almost all dirt roads, pastures, cattle trails and then single track trails. So im leaning towards the tubeless but i may let the dealer decide that for me. Thanks for some of the input, one week away from getting it. Cant wait.
    Good idea.

    Good luck to you whatever bike you end up with and however you use it! The important things are to ride, enjoy, and be safe, no matter what anyone else has to say.

    To the rest ...
    I can't believe the level of horsepucky I get from certain folks on this forum: I state what has worked perfectly for me, and you get all up in arms that your notions are the only dogma that one can ascribe to, anyone who does not agree is an idiot or ignorant of reality.

    I'm sorry, you jerkoffs: I report what I have observed and what my research provides evidence for, and voice my evaluations of things thereby, including the context of my riding situation. I am neither stupid nor inexperienced, and your words are not credible since they do not match the reality I have observed, researched, and experienced.

    I'm still waiting for someone to show me a manufacturer offering of a fat bike fitted from the dealer with manufacturer approved tubeless tires and all the required supporting paraphernalia as officially supported equipment.

    G

  82. #82
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    Good luck Banger and enjoy your new ride.

  83. #83
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    Banger, you're going to have a blast.
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    Quote Originally Posted by theBANGER View Post
    Ya this one got out of hand. ...
    Geez. It's like the topic turned to e-bikes or something.

    FWIW, I think Blue Cheese's post is the rational one: Newbie looking for input/opinions!

    Too bad G won't let it drop...

    I waited to switch to tubeless until I upgraded my rear hub. In the meantime I got 3 flats in 2 weeks -- ugh.

    Have fun with your new ride... it'll be a big grin no matter the tube/tubeless decision
    --------------

    [WTB] 1987 Cannondale SM800, 20", Pink with airbrushed graphics.

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    Donít worry, Iíll let everyone know what my decision is on the tubeless decision. 😂😂

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    Quote Originally Posted by J_Westy View Post
    Geez. It's like the topic turned to e-bikes or something...
    Don't you dare!

    Quote Originally Posted by theBANGER View Post
    Donít worry, Iíll let everyone know what my decision is on the tubeless decision. 
    No!
    Please don't!

    oh wait
    what the heck

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    Crazy on this ship of fools...

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    Oops bit of an edit, quoted the wrong message from Banger re tubeless.

    Good idea getting the shop to do it IMHO. Don't know what they would charge in the states, but I got mine done split tube by my lbs shortly after I got the my fatbike and two thorn punctures later.

    I didn't have a floor pump or compressor, they did the lot for about $20 incl the tubes, valves and sealant. Low labour costs in a developing country has it's advantages.

    Nearly two years later I've never had to remove a tire, used a couple of plugs once.

  88. #88
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    I went split tube for the fat bike. The front, a JJ 4.8 was a cinch. The rear, a Minion FBR, took a bit more effort to get seated (I think because it has more robust sidewalls-it's sure a helluva lot heavier than the JJ). I'm running Orange Seal Endurance in the front and Finish Line in the back as a sort of experiment. I removed a cholla pod from the rear last ride and it simply sealed right up with no drama. Tubeless rules.
    2016 El Oso Grande
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  89. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by theBANGER View Post
    Donít worry, Iíll let everyone know what my decision is on the tubeless decision. 
    Do whatever you think makes sense for you. Study the solution for what problem it is solving, and if that's your problem, consider using it. Ignore all the jerks who forever and always know that whatever they do is better.

    That's what I do.

    G

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtyHun View Post
    I went split tube for the fat bike. The front, a JJ 4.8 was a cinch. The rear, a Minion FBR, took a bit more effort to get seated (I think because it has more robust sidewalls-it's sure a helluva lot heavier than the JJ). I'm running Orange Seal Endurance in the front and Finish Line in the back as a sort of experiment. I removed a cholla pod from the rear last ride and it simply sealed right up with no drama. Tubeless rules.
    I will be interested to hear how the Finish Line works for you. I tried the general use Multi Seal (maker of Finish Line sealant) in hopes that it would work, but did not have good luck getting the tire sealed. The stuff is too thick to do the "Stan's Shake" to get it distributed around the bead. The Multi Seal is almost the consistency of yogurt. Is Finish Line thinner?

  91. #91
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    I've heard the same about Finish Line's newer stuff, but it sealed the one puncture this past week in a jiffy, so at least for things like cactus, it seems to do well.
    2016 El Oso Grande
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    Went the tubeless route...the shop couldnít recommend tubeless enough for what Iíll be doing with it

  93. #93
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    That shop did right by you.

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    Didnít get too much seat time on it this weekend but did sneak away for a 20 mile trail ride. The smiles per mile were great. Looking forward to putting a lot of miles on it!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Newbie looking for input/opinions!-db2ce5f2-1966-4cb8-ba8d-92ae9f8bdec6.jpg  


  95. #95
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    Hell yeah!
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    it looks sweet, enjoy!

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    Quote Originally Posted by theBANGER View Post
    ...The smiles per mile were great...
    It's pretty hard to beat the smiles per mile.

    (If you haven't yet, check out threads on different tire pressures for surface types, flat|ascending|descending)
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

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