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  1. #1
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    New to fat bikes, in need of a few tips.

    I went shopping for a mountain bike, when I found out about the fat bikes. I'm definitely getting one of these, but there's still a few questions I need answered before going through with it.
    I understand it's a very versatile bike, but what can't I do with it? What terrain wouldn't it be suited for?
    Is there a reason why none of them have any kind of suspension? Do you float better without them?
    I was really set on the idea of getting a single speed, but after more consideration I figured I'd get two speeds. One for the road, one for off-road. Any thoughts or tips on that? I'm also entirely new to gear sizes, any recommendations?
    I'd rather not go over 900$ for my starter bike. (Canadian dollars)

    I'm currently interested in these two models:
    https://moosebicycle.com/en/bicycles...at-bike-1.html
    (36lbs)

    https://www.statebicycle.com/collect...th-blue-orange
    (43lbs)

    Any thoughts? Pros or cons?

  2. #2
    Flying Sasquatch
    Reputation: KTMNealio's Avatar
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    I ride my fatbike everywhere. Around the neighborhood, at the skate park, at the bmx track, down the dry irrigation ditches this winter, in sand, on downhill mtb runs, on singletrack, on gravel roads,, or anything else you can think of. It is the most versatile bike you can get.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by hasnoidea View Post
    I went shopping for a mountain bike, when I found out about the fat bikes. I'm definitely getting one of these, but there's still a few questions I need answered before going through with it.
    I understand it's a very versatile bike, but what can't I do with it? What terrain wouldn't it be suited for?
    Is there a reason why none of them have any kind of suspension? Do you float better without them?
    I was really set on the idea of getting a single speed, but after more consideration I figured I'd get two speeds. One for the road, one for off-road. Any thoughts or tips on that? I'm also entirely new to gear sizes, any recommendations?
    I'd rather not go over 900$ for my starter bike. (Canadian dollars)

    I'm currently interested in these two models:
    https://moosebicycle.com/en/bicycles...at-bike-1.html
    (36lbs)

    https://www.statebicycle.com/collect...th-blue-orange
    (43lbs)

    Any thoughts? Pros or cons?
    Both junk. Shop used in that price range. Fat bike trader Facebook group would be a good place to start.

    Lots of used Pugsleys out there in your price range or less.

  4. #4
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    Extremely deep snow isn't happening unless it's groomed for snowmobiling, etc. Significant mud or deep sand can be real issues too. You're going to need studs to deal with ice. Other than that, fatbikes do handle a lot of conditions well, especially with wider rim/tire combinations when necessary.

    Some fatbikes sold today do come as full-suspension or hardtails. Bluto, Wren, etc. are forks you'll see. Obviously more expensive but worth it in rougher terrain.

    As far as gearing goes, there are other options out there beyond SS - in my case my one fatbike is 1x11 and the other is 1x10. I have found that useful in extremely hilly rock garden and/or snowy conditions.

    Granted, YMMV, especially if you want to hold your cost down going the starter bike route first.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the replies.

    I'm probably going to get a used bike, but options in my area are very limited. I might build it piece by piece over the next few months.

  6. #6
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    Check out Framed bikes. Good bikes definitely in your price range. Hmm, assuming you can get them in Canada.

  7. #7
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    I love the fatties. It's great when the surface is less stable, aka sand or snow, it also introduces a level of bounce. It's also slower on hard packed surface. So you need to decide where you're riding. For me, even if I only have 10% of soft surface, the wide tires make a difference. And I can run a 29 or even a 29+ wheel for other times. So yes, the fat frame offers more variability, the only drawback is slightly larger everything and therefor more cost. I'm fat all they way.

  8. #8
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    Personally, I like to have a full range of gears on the fatty since I never know what I'll be into. If you try SS-ing up a steep hill in 5" of snow, lemme know how that goes. For me, it doesn't go.

    The only place the fatty is "less-awesome" is where it isn't needed: miles of flat, smooth stuff just seems to wear on me. But the worse the conditions get, the better the fatty gets. When I first got mine I took it out to see what it could do. Because of the amount of traction it provided, low gears were easily justified for climbing crazy steep, chugging through mud and sand, and basically riding where other bikes simply can't.
    Getting a bike that can accept large tires seems to be paramount in setting the fatty apart from a "regular" bike.
    Thru axles provide suspension fork compatibility and rear hub stability.

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  9. #9
    Flying Sasquatch
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    If you run higher pressures than everyone here recommends you get less bounce and less rolling resistance. I run 15 in my 4.0 tires and 12 in my 4.8 tires. I weigh 265 though.

  10. #10
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    I've been riding mine year round for several years. The old Surly Endomorph tire tread is a bear on pavement... It's like when the power steering goes out on your vehicle. I've been using Larry's on my front tire for pavement and dirt... works pretty good. As far as suspension goes... why add the weight? I know some people are into it... but that is what the fatty tires and a good pump are for. When the trail is rooty or the snow is mushy or fresh I drop the air pressure... and fill it back up when needed... or I'm tired

    These aren't fast bikes but they are fun... I pull out my 29er or roadie from time to time but I put them away after a couple of rides. Once you go fat you never go back!

    I ride mine in everything... shallow marshes, mud, snow, sand, shale... make sure you lock it up.

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