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  1. #1
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    New to Fat Bikes

    Bet that you've seen that title before!

    Ok, so I've been a roadie and triathlete for years but, am finally playing in the dirt and loving it. I bit the bullet and bought a moonlander (should be here by the end of the week). Now, I'm starting to realize exactly how much I don't know so, any help would be appreciated. Questions that I have at the moment:

    1) I've only seen 1 type of inner tube listed on Surly's site, for their fat bikes. Is it one size fits all?
    2) Flats: I've read horror stories of taking forever to change a flat on a pugs, is it the same painful thing on a moonlander?
    3) Emergency Repair Kit: (really seems silly to ask but...) do you carry the same stuff that you would for a road bike? Tube, CO2 (or pump), tire irons, patch kit?
    4) Bottom bracket: well, there's plenty of articles on this but, has anyone come to a resolve on the drilling a hole/using a center sleeve?

    All other tips are welcome. I've really appreciated reading of others experiences with this beast!

    Thanks
    -dan

  2. #2
    will rant for food
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    1) They stretch. Some people use 2.7" downhill specific tubes, and just inflate them enough to fill up the tire. Other people spend the time setting up their tires to be tubeless, which is a big topic on its own.

    2) What? It takes a normal amount of time to change a flat on a pugs. Perhaps they weren't familiar with how to detach the tire bead from the rim, which can be awkward the first time. Once learned, changing flats on a fat tire is easy.

    3) Your common sense seems intact here. Except the CO2 is not very useful for fat tires. The trade off with fat bikes and portable pumps is that you have a lot of tire to inflate - try to find as large a volume pump as you can that you can still carry. I use a Lezyne Micro Floor Drive High Volume Pump (copy pasted). And expect to pump. A lot.

    4) I have no experience on that one.
    Latitude: 44.93 N

  3. #3
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    The old purple pugs, it takes some fiddling to change the tire for sure. You have to mess with the disc brakes, since the rotor gets in the way. Also a bit of a pain to get the proper chain tension and the wheel back on straight with no rub. It is such a hassle that I personally dread ever getting a flat.

  4. #4
    Laramie, Wyoming
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    1, 2, &3) Go tubeless and skip 1, 2, and most of number 3 except for the pump which you might want to change tire pressure.


    4) Answer, Chris King bottom bracket and skip the holes.

  5. #5
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    forego the toobless stuff and you'll be thankful as its far more variables vs just 1 toob.

  6. #6
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    New to Fat Bikes

    Ha, here we go again. 2 votes for tubeless. But, I also agree with changing the tube being the same, and nothing gets in the way....the rotor? Hardest part is getting the rear wheel on and off, which is solved quite easily by simply removing the quick release skewer completely.

  7. #7
    Laramie, Wyoming
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    Quote Originally Posted by nvphatty View Post
    forego the toobless stuff and you'll be thankful as its far more variables vs just 1 toob.
    This option and just keep fixing flats.

  8. #8
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    Don't listen to NVphatty... He's a tube loving curmudgeon. It's not hard to repair a flat on a Pugsley if you take off the skewer like Schott mentioned, but I've never actually had one on the trail... Tubeless is where it's at! Search the forums. There are tons of threads on it. Carry a spare tube (or 2), a hand pump (it would take several CO2 cartridges to fill a Moonie tire), and a patch kit just in case though.

  9. #9
    addicted to chunk
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    Every time I tried running tubes in the fatty, I'd end up with a flat at least every couple weeks. Annoying. Tubeless all the way. Yes they are some work to get setup but once set & filled with sealant, you can pretty much forget about flats & just ride.
    Riding.....

  10. #10
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    I've had flats on my Muk but easily fixed. I've never had an instant flat tire on the trails even when I went through some goat head thorns. It's usually a slow leak that you find the next morning. Back tire is a pain but usually but for me it's aligning the disc brakes after getting the tire in.

    You are going to love your fatty. The one thing you have to remember with fat bikes is tire pressure. Once you get that figured out, you can ride anywhere. On trails I run around a 7-10 psi and on the road it's 25 psi. Gravel is about 15 psi.

  11. #11
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    Thanks all! Very much appreciate all of the tips! What about preventive maintenance on the bottom bracket? Thoughts?

    Thanks again. I just got notification that it shipped and will be here Wednesday! Very excited!!!

  12. #12
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    New to Fat Bikes

    Well, in short, the bottom brackets are crap. Pull it apart to clean and grease on the regular until it dies for good...then replace. I still happen to be on my stock BB, but have given it more attention than any other in the past, and it isn't long for this world. When it goes, if the money is right, Phil Wood will take its place.

  13. #13
    Location: SouthPole of MN
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    Re: New to Fat Bikes

    The new enduring bearings on the MWOD cranks aren't that bad... just don't blast it with a power washer and you should be fine. I wouldn't screw around with tubeless on a moonlander and clown shoes... every thread I've read about those who have done it doesnt sound like it is an easy task with clown shoes. I've ridden my Moonlander all over in some really sketchy stuff and have only had to repair ONE tube. Easy to pull off, slap a scab on the hole, put that loose tire back on, and you are good to go on 15 minutes. Easy.

  14. #14
    Laramie, Wyoming
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    Quote Originally Posted by duggus View Post
    I wouldn't screw around with tubeless on a moonlander and clown shoes... every thread I've read about those who have done it doesnt sound like it is an easy task with clown shoes. I've ridden my Moonlander all over in some really sketchy stuff and have only had to repair ONE tube. Easy to pull off, slap a scab on the hole, put that loose tire back on, and you are good to go on 15 minutes. Easy.
    While riding the Moonlander yesterday, I saw two people with flats. I smiled and thought of this thread. duggus, you are WAY off base. The clownshoe rim is easy to go tubeless on. After buying a second patch kit for the Moonlander, I switched to tubeless and have never had another issue with flats. I find myself purposely riding over debris now.

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