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  1. #1
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    Need commuting, touring, fatbike for cold snowy winter comming?

    First, how flat resistant are the tires? Are they like the schwalbe green guard and smart guard flat resistant?

    How long do the tires last?


    What spiked tires are available? Carbide? Are spikes necessary on fatbikes on ice?

    And supposing I can't afford a fat bike, what can I do to my cross check to make it snow worthy?

  2. #2
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    Oh, and are there any fat bikes that use a thru axle up front? I never liked the idea of using a regular QR axle up front with disk brakes.

  3. #3
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    Also, how well would the 3.8 inches of pugsly tire float on the snow compared to the 4.8 inches of moonlander tire?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    First, how flat resistant are the tires? Are they like the schwalbe green guard and smart guard flat resistant?

    How long do the tires last?


    What spiked tires are available? Carbide? Are spikes necessary on fatbikes on ice?

    And supposing I can't afford a fat bike, what can I do to my cross check to make it snow worthy?
    Minimal flat protection. Fat tires are very light weight for their size.
    45NRTH makes a studded tire. Expensive but yes you do need studs for ice. Fat tires are great in snow but provide minimal improvements over normal tires on smooth ice.
    Looks like a couple through axle forks out this year, but mostly higher end models.

    For a winter commuter your CrossCheck is probably better suited unless you are using snowmobile trails or other off road trails. There are quite a selection of studded tires that fit the Crosscheck and all are much cheaper than a fat tire.

  5. #5
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    Out of curiosity, how well do those thumb shifters on the regular pugsly work?

  6. #6
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    I keep 2 winter* bikes, my Pugsley for snow, and my Troll for ice. I can usually tell which one is better for the day's commute by the end of my driveway, so I switch accordingly. Since you have a Cross Check, studded tires for that would be a good option for you. Any spots I have had to walk, a Moonlander wouldn't have helped. I still want one though, just because.

    My Husker Du tires have very little wear considering the abuse I put them through and have never (knock on wood) flatted them.

    * = fat bikes aren't just for snow!

    The used fatbike market will get huge end of September/Early October, so start saving now!
    Jason
    Disclaimer: www.paramountsports.net

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    Out of curiosity, how well do those thumb shifters on the regular pugsly work?
    Awesome. I prefer them over triggers, especially in winter.
    Jason
    Disclaimer: www.paramountsports.net

  8. #8
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    Okay, so what's the point in a fat bike if it doesn't float on top of snow?

    Are the holes on the rear of the pugsly frame for racks or are they for fenders?

    And how do you protect against flats with this type of tire?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    Okay, so what's the point in a fat bike if it doesn't float on top of snow?
    It will float on top of nice crusty snow, or packed trails, but it doesn't float on top of 10" of fresh wet stuff. It sure is fun to try though! It will go places no other bike can.
    Watch this: FAT TIRE BIKE ?? SURLY PUGSLEY & MOONLANDER - YouTube

    Are the holes on the rear of the pugsly frame for racks or are they for fenders?
    Yes, racks and fenders, even though there aren't traditional fenders available. Most normal racks mount easily, you don't need a fatbike specific one.

    And how do you protect against flats with this type of tire?
    You could put some Stan's or Slime in the tubes. That's the easiest way. But flats aren't nearly as common on fat bikes are they are on "normal" bikes. Harder to pinch flat, lower pressures conform to objects instead of letting them puncture, and deeper tread blocks too.
    Jason
    Disclaimer: www.paramountsports.net

  10. #10
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    Is there anything that will allow a bike to float on fresh wet snow?

  11. #11
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    What is your commute length? I commuted 15.5 km each way on my Pugsley for a month last fall, the final week in snow. Rides that last week were all over an hour long, and I was pushing fairly hard. At the end of that stretch I was absolutely exhausted.

    If I had continued commuting that distance in the snow I would have needed to take days off, or alternate with one of my faster bikes.

    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    Okay, so what's the point in a fat bike if it doesn't float on top of snow?
    You know that hard pedestrian trampled single track that vibrates your fillings out when riding a mountain bike? Barely feel a thing when you run fat bike tires around 5 psi. Last year I'd be disappointed when the city didn't plow the MUP before my commute. This year I was disappointed after they plowed it, making it less fun.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    Is there anything that will allow a bike to float on fresh wet snow?
    Excellent cardio and enduring leg strength. The motor will be the biggest difference in those conditions.
    Jason
    Disclaimer: www.paramountsports.net

  13. #13
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    Not really a commute anymore but typically anywhere up to 30 miles each way commonly.

    Will those 4" dillinger tires fit on a pugsly?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    Will those 4" dillinger tires fit on a pugsly?
    Easily
    Jason
    Disclaimer: www.paramountsports.net

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    Is there anything that will allow a bike to float on fresh wet snow?
    Skis.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    Okay, so what's the point in a fat bike if it doesn't float on top of snow?
    I've ridden regular bikes on snow enough to know that unless it's packed to just the right consistency with no uphills, it's not really possible to ride it. Even then you really can't corner or take the trail with much speed because your wheels simply give out due to being too skinny and the snow giving out. Too often the ruts created by hikers don't allow you to go in the direction you need to on the trail so some of the time you're getting kicked off the trail whist trying to ride the packed snow.

    Sure, if it's a few inches of new powder on top of dirt, you can ride just about any bike in it and have a fun time. When the ground is cold and you get a few inches of cold snow is tons of fun on a regular (non-fat) bike!

    On the other hand, for places where it's "winter" all winter long and the snow doesn't melt, the snow does not turn into ice, nor does it stay as "powder". It packs, yet it's always able to compress more, which is where the flotation comes in. Most trails with feet of snow do not get packed enough with hikers or anything else to ride with a regular-tired bike. With minimal "packing" you can ride the snow bikes on trails, and after a few passes of snowbikes the trail becomes much better packed and easier to ride with said snowbike, which turns it into an experience like riding a dirt trail, rather than the successful only-in-very-specific-conditions experience of riding a regular bike on a snow-packed trail.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  17. #17
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    Fat bikes do provide great traction on fresh snow and rutted roads, provided it is not too deep.
    With low pressure the pugs just tractors through 6" of fluffy rutted side streets while I can't keep my crosscheck upright.


    phat fingered from my phone
    Last edited by CBBaron; 08-28-2013 at 04:33 PM.

  18. #18
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    Okay, do they make skis for bicycles?

    And now the fat bike IS a way to travel on the fresh stuff (my travel would be both in very rural and very urban areas both plowed and unploughed.)?


    And how much trouble do you people have with goat heads, glass, nails, etc?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    First, how flat resistant are the tires? Are they like the schwalbe green guard and smart guard flat resistant?

    How long do the tires last?
    There is one fatbike tyre that is very flat resistant: The Origin8 Devist8er UL:
    Origin8 Devist8er

    I have them on the Moonlander and I love them: I had them since the beginning of the year and they never had a puncture. In my humble opinion, they can be compared with Schwalbe tyres in terms of their resistance to punctures. They grip well on any terrain and they roll fast on the road. They even make a nice sound at high speed on the road. They are cheap compared to Surly tyres and they last a long time. I honestly don't know why anybody would bother with another fatbike tyre.

    I'm a big fan of everything Surly, EXCEPT for their tyres. They are expensive and they puncture a lot. The Bud and Lou even get stick punctures:
    Milltown Cycles: So this happened.
    Ridiculous!

  20. #20
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    not going to get many flats on snow.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fatsinglespeeder View Post
    I'm a big fan of everything Surly, EXCEPT for their tyres. They are expensive and they puncture a lot. The Bud and Lou even get stick punctures:
    Milltown Cycles: So this happened.
    Ridiculous!
    Not really ridiculous when you get into some really rough stuff and are going fast enough... and under the right circumstances. This happens and can happen to any tire. I've never even (knock on wood) had a problem with a tube popping with sticks and rough stuff... let alone a giant one like that popping through.
    And as far as expensive goes...

    We will see if the Fatback, Trek, and Specialized tires are any cheaper or bring the price down...

  22. #22
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    If I bought this it wouldn't be a snow only bike. It would also be a utility and heavy touring bike too.

    I was thinking of a troll for that purpose, but why not kill two birds with one stone?

    Are the rack mounts on this thing that strong? They don't look very tough.

    And when do these new tires come out?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    If I bought this it wouldn't be a snow only bike. It would also be a utility and heavy touring bike too.

    I was thinking of a troll for that purpose, but why not kill two birds with one stone?

    Are the rack mounts on this thing that strong? They don't look very tough.

    And when do these new tires come out?
    A Pugsley will easily handle your touring load. Rack selection is a little limited because many are not designed to clear a 4" tire but several do fit including the Surly branded one. The fork also fits a rear rack mounted backwards.

    As to that flat shown above, freak accident and a different tire would not have helped unless it was way too heavy to be fun to pedal.
    These tires are light weight and flexible. Thats the reason they roll pretty well. However it also means that pointed objects can penetrate if at the right angle.
    For a commuter $100+ a pop for tires and fairly short road life steers me clear of fat bikes for that purpose. But I imagine with Black Floyds one would be fun.

    Craig

  24. #24
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    Yeah, hopefully they'll make some touring tires soon for these bikes.

    And do they really make skis for bicycle?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    Yeah, hopefully they'll make some touring tires soon for these bikes.

    And do they really make skis for bicycle?
    There is Black Floyd for hard surfaces. Several 2.4" and larger tires will fit on 65mm rims.

    And as for skis, it has been done
    Need commuting, touring, fatbike for cold snowy winter comming?-ktrak-snow-bike-kit-3-537x380.jpg
    Need commuting, touring, fatbike for cold snowy winter comming?-bike1.jpg


    Craig

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