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  1. #1
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    mystery fat bike

    A couple of years ago, surfin' for fat stuff, I came across a blog (can't remember the title) that had a picture of a custom beach/sand bike. The caption read: "check out this custom beach bike" or something like that. The bike appeared to have two lg. marges welded (or somehow joined) together front and rear. Lets see...thats roughly 130mm! for hubs it had two for each wheel with a section of tubing visible between them as a spacer/axle housing.Two full sets of spokes (wheel truing nightmare) . It was driven with a jack-shaft system, like the early Hanebrinks and other monster "fat" projects, but the jack-shaft was mounted up high just behind the seat (ft. chain went up at steep angle...rear chain went down at a steep angle) so it kept a more normal wheelbase. I swear it had regular endo's for tires- sidewalls angled inward from the beads(imagine seating those).Obviously a custom BB( probly a spindle & pressed in bearings like old Kliens), & custom fork. Frame & fork looked like polished aluminum. Did anyone else come across this or Know anything about it?

  2. #2
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    Ward, was it this one?
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  3. #3
    is buachail foighneach me
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    ooooo damn that's a sweet bike!

  4. #4
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    Thats it. Shows you how bad my memory is! those don't look like endo's, or lg. marge's and the frame deffinatly isn't polished. Very interesting though aye? anyone know what he used for rims & tires?

  5. #5
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    That is very cool, anyone have more pics of it ?

  6. #6
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    Thanks Alanm for bringing this one back for us to stare at. looking closely it looks kind of like two parallel skinny rims , mounted on one axle, and mounted between is some kind of fabric webbing or something acting as the "rim". and the tires look like like some kind of inner tubes turned tires or something?? The rear having some short paddles glued on? May have to drink a beer and stare at this one for a while... do some cypherin". I'd sure like to ride it! Thanks again!

    -Ward

  7. #7
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    Looks like for the jack-shaft he may have used an existing bottom bracket with "drive" side cranks mounted on both sides ( with the crank arms cut off). Looks like he may have left the seat tube (from whatever bike he cut it off of) connected to the BB and its now part of the rear triangle structure. Man, this guy was thinkin'!! what a great way to re-cycle old bike junk. All my old frames & boxes of parts may have a purpose after all. Oh ya, love the split down tube!

  8. #8
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    are you scottish too ward?, noticed you say `aye` lol
    those tyres are turf tyres.., i know that being a head greeenkeeper,now not sure what make exactly but have seen them before on machinery in a turf/greenkeeping/groundsman magazine before so they are proberly are alot heavier than our endo`s, like the wieght of a quad bike tyre.., i will try find out what the tyre make is,proberly made by; carlise,maxxis,kenda,bridgestone,or firestone, judging by the size it will be for a quad/utility trailer wheel, wicked bike though
    plan it...build it....ride it...love it....
    http://coastkid.blogspot.com/

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    May have some Scottish in me, not sure. German & dutch for sure. I do like ale, but I like a good lager too! The "aye" comes from my Canadian friends. They're allways reminding me it sounds better than "huh".Thanks for the input on tires. Good leads. I doubt I'll set out to build a "Frankenbike" real soon - but who knows where the brain stormin' will lead. What was your take on his rims? Oh ya, I have a good friend on the east coast that is Scottish and is also a head greenskeeper. Name is McMillian.

  10. #10
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    cant really make out the rims,maybe 2 rims indeed bolted together then 2 tubes used,hopefully someone will find the builder or more info on the beast
    aye scottish greenkeepers are all over the world now!,alot from good cousres here get headhunted for big jobs abroad,a good job on the west coast of canada would suit me fine-though need to be near some good beaches for the pug
    plan it...build it....ride it...love it....
    http://coastkid.blogspot.com/

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by coastkid71
    ...those tyres are turf tyres...i will try find out what the tyre make is,proberly made by; carlise,maxxis,kenda,bridgestone,or firestone...
    Any chance of giving us some links?

    If I could get my hands on a set of those who knows what could be built?

    Actually a set of worn out ones would be better - lighter.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  12. #12
    is buachail foighneach me
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    Have at it velo:

    http://www.cedarrapidstire.com/category/5352/tires

    I'm sure there's a local equivalent.They don't have tires quite like those(or as tall), that I could find.

  13. #13
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    Carlisle look promising



    Quite cheap too compared to bike tyres, but heavy
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  14. #14
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    those are drum brakes in back or IGH?
    If Huffy made an airplane, would you fly in it?

  15. #15
    is buachail foighneach me
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike
    Carlisle look promising



    Quite cheap too compared to bike tyres, but heavy

    Just remmber that 18.5 is the outside diameter. Those things are wide, but tiny. ATV tires can be had that measure out to @30" od, but are usually 6 ply and would be heavy as hell even after having the lugs cut down. I suppose you could figure out a way to remove several of the plies though, if you were so inclined. For the effort, you might do better to sew two endos together.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach
    Just remmber that 18.5 is the outside diameter...
    Just worked that out.

    Back to looking at motorbike tyres then
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  17. #17
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    Sean is right...sew a couple endo's together...Dave Kelly used to do that in Fairbanks for the original Snowcats (two rims welded together). I want to say he made the first 3.7 tire...
    If Huffy made an airplane, would you fly in it?

  18. #18
    is buachail foighneach me
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    Dave is still at it, in Anchorage. Word on the street is he's got some nice, light, kevlar beaded endos...

  19. #19
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    I think I found the answer!!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails mystery fat bike-shitzor1.jpg  


  20. #20
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    ...That's what I heard...For a quality tune on your ride, see Dave at Paramount...
    If Huffy made an airplane, would you fly in it?

  21. #21
    will rant for food
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    Does anyone have a pic of the bike in higher resolution?

  22. #22
    That Unicycle Guy
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    I have built a tire casing using about 20 loops of 50lb braided fishing line for each bead and polyester cloth cut at a 45˚ bias for the casing. Folded the material around the beads overlapping in the centre and glued it all together with some sort of rubber cement. I glued the tread from another bike tire on there and it worked better than I would have thought. Was quite lightweight too. Around 500g for a 26x2.3ish tire if I recall correctly.

    I was not very careful and the tire was pretty uneven so I did not use it long so have no idea how long it would have lasted. It was really light though and adding more plies might make it last a bit longer. Probably easier than modding an ATV tire down to reasonable weight.

  23. #23
    Just Ride!
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    This bike looks the bike I saw in Venice beach back in '04-05. Where was this picture taken?

    Quote Originally Posted by alanm
    Ward, was it this one?

  24. #24
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    I've sewed up a few ripped tyres in my time, so I wouldn't averse to mating 2 together.

    Even better would be to make a tyre from scratch. In the 1890s it was common to strip back the worn tread of your tyre and glue a new tread on. You made your own solution with natural rubber and naptha. They also did home vulcanising with a bunsen burner (most houses had piped gas in those days).

    Certainly it's one way to get the tyre we need.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  25. #25
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    Could split an endo and sew in a center "tread width" section. Maybe get someone to do it on an industrial machine w/ kevlar thread... that is if you want to stay with a traditional tire and tube set-up. I don't think that's what this guy did. Since we can't seem to find the guy or any other info or pic's, I can't really prove my theory... but I've stared at this thing many many times trying to cypher what he did. Look closely at just the rear wheel... looks to me like two "skinny" rimmed wheels and hubs(one w/ a drum brake, like an old Stumy Archer or ?) mounted side by side, sharing and being separated by one axle. Then he's mounted some sort of fabric between the rims to form the new "rim bed". I think the tires are simply some kind of auto, tractor, truck or ? inner tube mounted in the same fashion as a tubular tire. IMO it was an ingenious way to do it too. If this is what he did he saved a ton of weight over a regular tire & rim "monster fat" set up... and possibly did it w/o spending much $$ either. Appears that most of the parts and materials used were parts and pieces of other bikes... recycled into one cool "fat" project.

    I think if I take on a monster fat project, 1st thing I do will be to study up on inner tubes. Theres got to be a million kinds out there. Something with a fairly thick wall, just the right size (when inflated) and high quality- uniform in thickness so it keeps it's shape when inflated. Maybe a heavy duty front tractor tire tube of some sort?

  26. #26
    That Unicycle Guy
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    keep in mind that people use tractor innertubes to slide down hills. You will want some kind of tread on that if you are going to use it in winter.

  27. #27
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    The wheel looks relatively straightforward to duplicate. It does look like 2 rims. If he's got 2 hubs in there, then it's possible to lace each rim up offset so they're spaced at the right distance apart and parallel, then all that's needed is the world's fattest bike rim tape to fill the gap.

    This guy is a challenge to our ingenuity!

    It looks like there is a brand name on the rear tyre.

    The left hand rear hub looks like a hub brake - could be off a bike, but maybe off a small stepthrough motorbike.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by ward
    .

    I think if I take on a monster fat project, 1st thing I do will be to study up on inner tubes. Theres got to be a million kinds out there. Something with a fairly thick wall, just the right size (when inflated) and high quality- uniform in thickness so it keeps it's shape when inflated. Maybe a heavy duty front tractor tire tube of some sort?
    Search for my post on Russian off road rigs. 'Off topic but not really' or something like that. They use tubes for tires and bands or aluminum channel for traction. Seem to hold up. The make really cool cage wheels too.
    No it never stops hurting, but if you keep at it you can go faster.

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