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  1. #1
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    Mulefut SL80 rims tubeless

    I ordered a bike with the Mulefut 80 SL rims and want to make it tubeless. This Parks Tools Video shows it all and seems easy. I don't want to hack it, rather buy approved material. My goal is to not have to carry a spare tube with me.

    Mulefut 78mm Tubeless Tape, and the Mulefut 60 mm Rim Strip. I don't mind paying for rim strip again, but could someone explain why I couldn't use the rimstrip already on the bike? I understand the tape is nice since it has the correct width (unlike Parks video where they overlap thinner tape).

    For sealant I figured using Stan's sealant. Unless there is a reason something else is better or more aproppriate

    For Valves I like and Schrader valves. Just easier with compressor, gages etc. Stan has 10 mm (7.5-8.5mm hole) and 14 mm (8.5-11 mm hole) options. Is there any reason to chose the one over the other? I think my bike comes with Presta tubes, so I have to drill the hole anyway. I assume for thinner rims one would chose the smaller hole for better structure, but for a fatbike that may not matter? Will the large one be more stable?
    The valves refer to "hugo 52 rims". I have no idea what that means. Or should I just get different valves? Googling always brings me to Stan's site.

    Am I missing something? The video makes it look like normal tire levers can be used. I have a compressor for airtools.

    I know there are hundreds of videos, and have searched... I want to order before I have the bike here. So any advice appreciated.

    BTW, when replying to posts it didn't actually use my links and I couldn't edit. So I hope this works.

  2. #2
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    The MuleFut wheels are great for tubeless. The valve holes are presta and will need drilled 8.5mm for schraeders. there are many choices of stems from nickel plated brass, brass or anodized aluminum. Amazon has em as well as many other websites. Either presta or schraeder are good choices. You may need a spacer between the stem nut and rim to create enough tension on the rubber cone for a good seal.

    Tire removal is no different between tubes and tubeless other than a potential mess from sealant.
    The sealant I use is Orange Seal. It's less annoying and stays pliable. Easier cleanup and no ammonia. Iv'e had no corrosion whatsoever with it.

    The rimstrip is good to go however, you will need to tape with either the Ringle tape or another variety that will make it edge to edge of the rim.
    The Single issue tape actually works well although, it doesn't stretch. Keep it taught as yo go around the rim to prevent wrinkles. Overlap the ends of the tape several inches and good to go.

    Tape over the rim strip, mount the tire and inflate with a tube to 20-25 psi over nite to set the tape into the rim. Next day, deflate and unseat one side of the tire and remove the tube, install the valve stem. Lay the wheel on a bucket with the loose bead down and inflate until the bead seats. let the air out and a does of sealant, air up and go ride it around for a few minutes to distribute sealant. Check the pressure and top it off. Good to go.

    Yeah, it's a little bit of a project but can be very nice in the end.
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  3. #3
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    Mulefuts are so easy tubeless. Provided you have tubeless tires. If their not name brand tubeless tires, their going to be be worthless for tubeless set up.


    The stock rim strip is fine, likely a bit heavy but its main job is to cover the rim cut outs.

    Truly i think presta valves are better. Schrader valves are prone to junk building up then not sealing properly anymore. And this has nothing to do with sealant. Just crud from riding. Then you put air in and push the crud in. Prestas dont have that issue and arent spring loaded to maintain the valve being closed. Ya schrader is easier for compressors and such. But tubeless schraders have given more problems than prestas ever have for me.

    Compressor makes tubeless set up gravy as well. Just make sure to use soapy water (basic dish soap) on the beads to seat.

    As banshee pointed out and i want to repeat it, spacer under the nut on the valve stem. VERY IMPORTANT.

    AVOID ALUMINUM VALVE STEMS FOR TUBELESS. Any sealant with ammonia will corrode the crap out of them if there is any tiny scratch the sealant can touch. Made that mistake already.

    Sun ringles tubeless kit is the easiest and best solution when being new to tubeless and trying to first time it on a fat bike, probably the hardest tubeless set up there is.

    Beyond that, banshee covered everything well, just wanted to double up to stress importance on some things.

    I personally used Kapton Tape but using it isnt for new people or faint hearted. But possibly the best tape for the purpose once you fully understand how to work with it. Just not forgiving to anything less than perfect install.

    My latest bike has regular tubeless tape because it was preinstalled and im changing it when its time to pull the tire to remove old sealant.

    One more thing, you said you dont want to carry a spare tube. You better not plan on going too far away from civilization. Tubeless IS NOT flat proof. There are things that can happen like too big of a puncture, sidewall damage etc that renders the sealant useless.

    This is especially a problem in winter time. Cant see crap under snow and walking out can take a lot longer.

    In my case I make sure i am within a safetly comfortable distance to walk out based on the weather so I can avoid carrying a spare tube.

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    A simple adapter will enable you to use compressor on schrader valves. I used to use presta on skinny tires to inflate at gas stations, but not a great idea as they are notoriously in accurate

  5. #5
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    I converted my Nutrail's Mulefuts to tubeless about a year ago and was really easy (I was putting Jumbo Jim tyres on the rims), as long as you ensure the tape adheres nicely to the rims - with no wringles as said above. After adding sealant I went for a ride to ensure it was well distributed within the rim/tyre and the tyres held pressure immediately.

    The fun bit not mentioned yet is choosing a rimstrip to match (or not) your bike's colour scheme or just a wild pattern. I use Grosgrain 50mm ribbon as it stays fairly clean and is cheap to buy on eBay. I also then put the original rimstrip over the tape for extra protection and to help the tyre slide up to the rim but this is maybe OTT. YMMV

    Mulefut SL80 rims tubeless-nutrail-orange-wheel-tape.jpg

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAKC Ind View Post
    Mulefuts are so easy tubeless. Provided you have tubeless tires. If their not name brand tubeless tires, their going to be be worthless for tubeless set up.
    disagreement on this


    if you use stock rimstrip >and fatty strippers< just about any damn tire will work tubeless on mulefut, easily.

    I know, because I do it. mulefut 80's and hodags, dillingers, nates, and snow shoes...no problems. all hold psi well past sealant drying up (orange seal)

    I do burn a fatty stripper per tire each change because they fuse themselves to the bead and cannot be reused. but it's worth the ultra reliable tubeless fatty action
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  7. #7
    Rippin da fAt
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    Quote Originally Posted by MozFat View Post
    A simple adapter will enable you to use compressor on schrader valves. I used to use presta on skinny tires to inflate at gas stations, but not a great idea as they are notoriously in accurate
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  8. #8
    Rippin da fAt
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAKC Ind View Post
    Mulefuts are so easy tubeless. Provided you have tubeless tires. If their not name brand tubeless tires, their going to be be worthless for tubeless set up.


    The stock rim strip is fine, likely a bit heavy but its main job is to cover the rim cut outs.

    Truly i think presta valves are better. Schrader valves are prone to junk building up then not sealing properly anymore. And this has nothing to do with sealant. Just crud from riding. Then you put air in and push the crud in. Prestas dont have that issue and arent spring loaded to maintain the valve being closed. Ya schrader is easier for compressors and such. But tubeless schraders have given more problems than prestas ever have for me.

    Compressor makes tubeless set up gravy as well. Just make sure to use soapy water (basic dish soap) on the beads to seat.

    As banshee pointed out and i want to repeat it, spacer under the nut on the valve stem. VERY IMPORTANT.

    AVOID ALUMINUM VALVE STEMS FOR TUBELESS. Any sealant with ammonia will corrode the crap out of them if there is any tiny scratch the sealant can touch. Made that mistake already.

    Sun ringles tubeless kit is the easiest and best solution when being new to tubeless and trying to first time it on a fat bike, probably the hardest tubeless set up there is.

    Beyond that, banshee covered everything well, just wanted to double up to stress importance on some things.

    I personally used Kapton Tape but using it isnt for new people or faint hearted. But possibly the best tape for the purpose once you fully understand how to work with it. Just not forgiving to anything less than perfect install.

    My latest bike has regular tubeless tape because it was preinstalled and im changing it when its time to pull the tire to remove old sealant.

    One more thing, you said you dont want to carry a spare tube. You better not plan on going too far away from civilization. Tubeless IS NOT flat proof. There are things that can happen like too big of a puncture, sidewall damage etc that renders the sealant useless.

    This is especially a problem in winter time. Cant see crap under snow and walking out can take a lot longer.

    In my case I make sure i am within a safetly comfortable distance to walk out based on the weather so I can avoid carrying a spare tube.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    Orange Seal FTW!! No ammonia and easier clean up. Easier to peel outta the tires when it comes to tire swaps. Over a year on my aluminum valve stems and not one issue thus far. Hafta admit, a supply of valve cores is in order.

    OP, the thought of not carrying a spare tube on a back country expedition makes my skin crawl! Tubeless with sealant is not impervious to flats. Short rides near home, it's all good...
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  9. #9
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    Thanks for all the replies. Sounds like using the 78mm mullefut rim tape is best. I wasn't able to find the link to the sunringle page for the complete kit, but assume i need to buy the tape and rims trip separately (like I linked above). Also sounds like the orange seal is a better (or more recommended sealant)?

    Some more clarifications needed:
    1. Is there any issue by just cutting the rim strip small enough instead of buying the Mulefut rim strip? This video shows it that way. The mulefut rim strip seems to be 60 mm.
    2. That video also shows him using some additional orange tape over the rim tape (over rim strip), is there something to that?
    3. Any advantage of using the 7.5 mm hole valves (standard seems to be 8.5)?

    I'm probably overthinking this, but don't want to dismantle my tires and then have to order something else.

  10. #10
    Rippin da fAt
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    Trimming the rim strip as in the video gives the tape some metal to stick to. The method used is very reliable. Double layer of tape edge to edge makes the arrangement a little more durable and reliable. Some peeps don't like the rim strips to bulge when the tires are pumped up.

    Schraeder vs Presta is nothing more than personal choice. Either works much the same. Schraeder is convenient in that you can air up at the gas station without a valve adapter. Both will require the occasional valve core replacement when they get plugged with sealant.

    Again, Orange Seal does not have the nasty ammonia that causes corrosion to things like valve stems and spoke nipples and actually puts Stan's to shame in initial seal up and clean up.

    You should be fine with the MuleFut tape. Take your time as you tape up, be patient. Follow the video as the job was nicely done.



    I have Rolling Daryl's and the MuleFut is a tighter fit and far easier to air up.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    disagreement on this


    if you use stock rimstrip >and fatty strippers< just about any damn tire will work tubeless on mulefut, easily.

    I know, because I do it. mulefut 80's and hodags, dillingers, nates, and snow shoes...no problems. all hold psi well past sealant drying up (orange seal)

    I do burn a fatty stripper per tire each change because they fuse themselves to the bead and cannot be reused. but it's worth the ultra reliable tubeless fatty action
    I did the fatty stripper route and is reliable but such a pain in the ass. Especially if you want to swap tires, as you even pointed out, set up has to start all over and buy new strips. Break a valve stem, start all over, need to slap a tube in, buy new strips. Plus having to trim the strip, another PITA.

    Definately better on mulefuts than none tlr rims lmao. That was a freaking nightmare but worked until i could afford to build my mulefut wheels.

    Works well if your set on using specific tires that dont do well tubeless, but cost and hassle sucks if you want to be able to swap tires or anything.

    I have nothing against it, but proper tire and standard set up I havent touched besides adding a little air once in while in 2 years. Sealant is probably just a coating on the tire now (no boogers rolling around). I added some back in march after winter. So its just as reliable.

    Rim strip, tape, tubeless tire and in 20 minutes first set up is done on both wheels. Need to fix something, most effort is getting tire off the bead. Dont have to replace anything except for whatever repair (unless of course its a spoke/nipple), add fluid, air up and go.

    And I should say a tubeless tire isnt required as long as it is hard to pop loose from the bead lip. Have had non-tlr tires fit tighter on some tubeless rims better than tubeless tires.

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  12. #12
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    Thanks for all your advice. I ordered the Mulefüt rim tape, orange seal and valves and will just cut the rim-strip that comes with the bike to size.

  13. #13
    Rippin da fAt
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    Rims without the UST style beadseat are laughable at best, but whattya want from Walmart?
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  14. #14
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    Mulefut strips and SunRingle tape make it very easy....my Farley 7 setup super easy this way although i did need to use a compressor to seat the Barbegazi's.

    I don't see the point of using FattyStrippers for these wheels, could use shrink wrap if you wanted for far cheaper and it would do the same thing.
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  15. #15
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    Mulefut are good tubeless rims. Mine on my 7 setup quick and easy. I used the ringle tape and a floor pump. took about a half hour. Been on there for about a year and still good.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by MozFat View Post
    A simple adapter will enable you to use compressor on schrader valves. I used to use presta on skinny tires to inflate at gas stations, but not a great idea as they are notoriously in accurate
    But the problem will be the restriction of the valve.
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  17. #17
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    Mine are working out great using the Sunringle tape, the issue for me was to get the Nimble B's to seal but once they sealed have been bulletproof using Orange Sub Zero sealant.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DiRt DeViL View Post
    Mine are working out great using the Sunringle tape, the issue for me was to get the Nimble B's to seal but once they sealed have been bulletproof using Orange Sub Zero sealant.
    Oh, for a fatbike (snow use!) I see i ordered the regular sealant. What will happen if I don't have the subzero? Leaks? Or all sealant flaking off? Sheet says regular is for 11° (I assume Fahrenheit?) and subzero to -20° (again, no unit listed). I assume I don't ride at -20°F since I don't commute. I'm in WI, i assume I would ride down to 0°F

    Can I use the regular for my regular tires and use subzero for winter? I plan to get studded tires for winter, but the "summer" sealant will be on the rim etc.
    I already ordered the regular, and it also seems less expensive.

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    Did you not get the sub zero tires? They have been known to crack above 0°

  20. #20
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    My trick for applying tape to the rims is to put the bike frame in a stand (or you could flip it upside down) Mount the wheel, without the tube or tire on the frame. Use a velcro strap or rubber band to hold the brake lever in so that the rim does not spin. Now you have a nice stable rim on which to stretch the tape. Stretch the tape over 1/3 +/- of the rim, release the brake, rotate the wheel and repeat until rim is fully taped, + a couple inches as others have said.

    No special rim strip is needed. As others said, just trim it a bit so that you have more tape seal direct to the aluminum rim. Leave about 3/16" of rim strip on each side of the cutout holes.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
    Can I use the regular for my regular tires and use subzero for winter? I plan to get studded tires for winter, but the "summer" sealant will be on the rim etc.
    I already ordered the regular, and it also seems less expensive.
    Yes, regular for summer. Do not worry about any "summer" residue on the rims. (I rinse my rims at every tire change)

    If you want cheap, do a search on homebrew sealants. I use latex mold maker, windshield washer fluid and some fine glitter or corn meal. I can make a gallon for less than $30, it works, it lasts and does not freeze.

  22. #22
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    So I got my bike and started converting to tubeless. The rims already had the 60 mm SunRingle rim strip, so i didn't need to buy that or cut the existing (possibly wider) strip. I installed the sunringle 78mm tape, and put the tire back on. i also installed a Stan's Schrader valve.

    So far so good. But I couldn't really seat the tire so it is tight to the rim and therefore can't inflate it. i tried to use the tire levers to get the tire to the rim like in the Park Video. This works, but as I move to the other side the tire moves back to the center of the rim again. I have the 4.8" Maxxi tires.

    Then I watched this video again and the guy puts a 26" regular inner tube around the tire. with some fiddling it actually inflated.

    Then I had whistling leaks, maybe 5 (with soap detector) including from the rim strip. So something went wrong there. I removed the valve core and inserted 3 oz of sealant and that seems to stop the obvious leaks. Will turn the wheel and keep inflating. So this doesn't seem to be fool-proof enough to work without sealant.

    This wasn't as straightforward as I hoped (it never is it seems). Moving on to the rear tire now. If you have any more advice, greatly appreciated.

  23. #23
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    Expecting it to work without sealant is a mistake on your part.

    Leaks from the rim strip tell me the tape job had some wrinkles or a dirty spot on the rim where the tape did not adhere.

    Using a 26" tube, bungee cords or ratchet strap to flatten the tire and spread out the beads is a pretty common step.

    Setting up tubeless is not hard with a Mulefut, but that is not to say that it does not require a few additional steps vs a tubed setup.

    It's best to take your bike for a spirited ride to slosh the sealant around to fill any small leaks. Simply rotating the wheel is not vigorous enough to get the sealant to coat the entire rim to tire interface. Vigorously shaking the the wheel/tire may do the trick, but riding is better. If your tire goes flat over night, do not panic and take everything apart. Add a little more sealant, pump it up and go for a ride.

  24. #24
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    Blue covered it. Couple mistakes made.

    Are those maxxis tires actual tubeless versions.

    First is your tubeless tape install is bad. Going to give you nothing but problems. Need to redo it. Cleaning rim with iso alcohol first is required as well as very clean hands.

    Secondly, you shouldnt be seating the beads without a tube installed first. Tape rim, use tube to seat beads and leave for a bit to make sure tape is properly adhered to the rim.

    Then let air out of tube, pop bead on one side only. Remove tube, install stans valve. Put way more than 3oz of sealant in there. At least 5oz minimum. 3oz is for regular tires.

    Remove valve core. Inflate tire to max psi if needed and maintain that pressure till bead pops on.

    Do the "stans shake" to get sealant in the bead seats of both sides.

    Beads WILL leak a little at first. Sealant will take care of it till tires fully mate to rims. Tires come folded so there "kinks" in the bead at first that will seep air and sealant a little.

    Install valve core, reinflate tire so its got some support to it and let it sit for a while. Check for leak after that, if nothing is leaking, install on bike and go. Watch tire pressures for the first couple days.

    If any leaks exist at the rim strips/valve, you made a mistake on tape and valve install. Sealant getting under rim tape will degrade adhesive and just get worse over time.

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    Yeah I didn't expect it to be perfect, but my goal was to be better than that.
    See my rim tape, has wrinkles. But I tried to be very tight and focussed on pushing it on the metal (at edge, where it sticks to the rim, not in center where the rim strip is)
    Mulefut SL80 rims tubeless-rim-taped.jpg
    For the second wheel I paid more attention but noticed the rim is full of holes. there are spare holes for more spokes. and at the very edge there is small holes leading to a void (rim seems to be double there). Lot's of options for air to escape.
    Mulefut SL80 rims tubeless-rimholes.jpg

    I knew 3 oz is not enough. But wanted to get it done now thinking I may have to re-do it anyway. I plan to get studded tires for winter, so this may only be for some more weeks.

    And the rim strip was not 100% centered. but with the imprints from spokes etc. it was hard to move it by a few mm.

    Thanks for your help and advice.

  26. #26
    Rippin da fAt
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    Nothing a few days with an inner tube won't cure.
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  27. #27
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    Getting ready to convert the Hodag/Mulefut 80's on my Farley EX. I'll use the standard rim strips and the 78mm SunRingle tape. How valuable is re-tubing after taping and letting it sit inflated for awhile in order to improve the seal of the tape before putting in sealant?

    Also, how much pressure can I use in these Hodags to get the bead to seat?

    I'd add that on the few non-fat tires I've converted, and even on auto tires as wide as the meaty 275/35-19inch tires on my car, I've found that a ratcheting strap circumferentially around the center works every time.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cuyuna View Post
    Getting ready to convert the Hodag/Mulefut 80's on my Farley EX. I'll use the standard rim strips and the 78mm SunRingle tape. How valuable is re-tubing after taping and letting it sit inflated for awhile in order to improve the seal of the tape before putting in sealant?

    Also, how much pressure can I use in these Hodags to get the bead to seat?

    I'd add that on the few non-fat tires I've converted, and even on auto tires as wide as the meaty 275/35-19inch tires on my car, I've found that a ratcheting strap circumferentially around the center works every time.
    retubing and inflating to 40 (!) and letting it sit will only help, so if you have
    the time, do it. lube the beads when you do this so they pop all the way up
    by themselves and spin the tire to verify it's perfectly installed. the tire
    will have an easier time popping up when you go tubeless. and yeah use a tube
    to get one bead up 100%, and hand-work the other bead up as far as you can
    when you are swapping out the tube for splooge and need to pump it up.
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  29. #29
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    40 psi may destroy the kevlar beads. 20 psi will do the job just fine. lube with soapy water and away ya go.
    Unseat one bead and remove the tube and install the valve stem. Tug the sidewall toward the edge of the rim and shoot some air in.

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  30. #30
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    40psi and a fat bike tire dont mix. No reason to ever go that high. As Banshee said, soapy water goes a long way.

    Bontrager tires and mulefuts are probably the easiest tubeless combo Ive ever dealt with especially for fat bikes. 20 psi with soapy water and just let it sit for a few minutes if bead doesnt pop on all the way right away. I dont even need a tube at all for that combo.

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  31. #31
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    OK 20 psi...I was thinking 2.4 tires
    but yes I remember my hodags and dillingers pop up at 22 psi or less...

    I have done 7 front and back tubeless tire mounts on my mulefut 80's and a
    standard jow blow floor pump and empty presta core is all I needed, after I have seated one bead 100% with a tube, and the other bead at least 75% with my fingers. and laundry soap + water on a toothbrush bead lube
    "Eating Spam, and Oreos, and drinking Thunderbird, baby" -Baby Huey/James Ramey

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by BansheeRune View Post
    40 psi may destroy the kevlar beads. 20 psi will do the job just fine. lube with soapy water and away ya go.
    Unseat one bead and remove the tube and install the valve stem. Tug the sidewall toward the edge of the rim and shoot some air in.

    Flaming hoops not required...
    Yeh, everything I've read about the process for fat bike tires indicates 20-24 as max, which was my plan.

    "Flaming hoops" definitely reminds me of my days as a dealership auto mechanic. When we got a tire/rim combo that we just couldn't seat, the last-resort maneuver was to seat one bead, then spray starting fluid (ether) into the tire and toss in a match. Never saw it fail to seat, but it was always exciting. This was in pre-OSHA days......

  33. #33
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    Judging from the pictures I would trim 1/8"+ off the rim strip on each side. Leave enough to cover the spokes. More adhesive tape in contact with the rim the better.

    I am a big fan of Zip flashing tape in lieu of the yellow stans/Sun type tape. (I do use the yellow stans/Tesa tape on my road wheels there the tape is narrower and can be stretched into place.) Zip is more flexible and stretches nicely to conform tight. Yes, it does require trimming one side.

    BTW, when you dismount tires you can recycle the sealant. You might save half of it.

    Taking the time to pay attention to detail on the tape job will pay dividends in the long run. I have 4 or 5 tire changes on my tape and no issues.

  34. #34
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    Gorilla tape has worked fine for me on two bikes with Mulefuts. The standard 2.88”, 73mm tape is a great match on the inside of the rims.

    Nine simple steps.
    1-remove tire
    2-tape over rim strip with gorilla tape with a few inches of overlap and poke hole with wood screw.
    3-add tubeless valve (I’d think presta adaptor is less trouble than drilling rims but personal choice).
    4-replace tire
    5-air up to seat bead (20 PSI)
    6-remove air and valve core
    7-add 4ounces sealant each using Stans injector. Any set up through the core is easier with bead already set.
    8-Air up.
    9-Spin them. Maybe keep spinning and adding air for a day if not holding air well. They will set up.

    Just did my Ithiqua that came with mulefuts last Sunday. Front held pressure instantly but rear took a day with some more spinning and added air twice more. Both held air great since Monday.
    I do have a large compressor but the mulefuts are easy enough that a pump would have worked. Some wheels I’ve done would have been killer without the compressor.
    Worth noting- My two wheels with cassette, rotors, Kenda Juggernauts pro 4.5, kenda tubes -17.4LBS. Subtract tubes, add gorilla tape, stans presta valves, 4 ounces of sealant each- 16.0 LBS.
    Best-cheap upgrade. Better traction and 1.4lbs of rotating and unsprung mass removed. The next 1.4lbs of rotating/unsprung mass would cost 2k worth of carbon.

    *carry a tube and tire boot, gashes happen.

  35. #35
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    Although I have the sunringle tubeless kit I keep using clear packing wrap.
    It's quick and easy to do. Plus there is no mess to clean when swapping tires as you just toss the few wraps away.

  36. #36
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    I found rubbing the tape with a sticker application squeegee (to work out wrinkles and get it to stick better) worked way better than putting a tube in it and letting it sit. YMMV

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