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  1. #1
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    Motobecane Sturgis NX Review

    My first fat bike, a 2018 Motobecane Sturgis NX, arrived last week and deserves a review. Other threads cover the Sturgis series, but the NX goes a bit under. I hope this thread leads to some good discussions on this bike (and hope no trolling and off-topicÖ one can hope)

    Why this bike?

    It was the cheapest ($1,100) entrance into having the new 197mm size rear axles for wider tires, is tubeless ready and has 1x11 drivetrain. It also already has 180mm rotors and internal cable routing. At least to me that was important. I have no experience with fatbikes and also considered the $500 bullseye Monster, but Iím sure this would have had too many limitations and in 1-2 years I would upgrade. The $2,000 (+shipping) Canyon Dude also seems to be a very good value, but as a novice I wasnít sure a better bike would really give me better riding for what I do. I also looked into front suspension bikes, but ultimately decided against it.

    Use:

    Main motivation for a fatbike was to have a snow sport and to go on the MTB trails and the dirt. No technical stuff with jumping etc. I also looked and tested LBS fatbikes like the Fatboy and Farley. But those prices would have made it a no-fatbike winter.

    Size:

    After measuring myself (6íand 34Ē inseam) and my existing bike about 100 times, I decided to order the L (19Ē) size and am happy with it. The only downside online is you are on your own with sizing. But the one LBS who only had an M size of the bike I looked at told me I have to put 50% (refundable) down for them to get an L, so that is not much better. The sizing chart and description from BD seems pretty good. It helped to have another bike that fits for measuring that out.

    Purchase:

    The 2017 Sturgis NX was sold out at end of August 2017 and some quick emails with bikesdirect confirmed the 2018 are coming soon with no changes. It actually showed up on the website that night and I ordered it. They were listed as pre-order to be shipped September 4-15th (that was end of august). I fully expected it to be shipped at the tail end, but on September 7th I got my Fedex shipping confirmation. About 6 days later I picked it up at the nearest Fedex Office. The box is 58Ēx31Ēx12Ē and fits upright into a Honda CRV.



    Assembly:

    Assembly was easy. I took some detours because the internet told me threads are often not well lubricated. I ended up taking out the BB (need crank removing tool, not like Hollowtech) and the threads had some grease, probably the amount you get from a factory (not like someone on a bike forum would). I also opened up the head set to see the bearings. It looks like an integrated headset and the sealed bearings looked well greased. It wasnít sure if they can be taken apart and serviced, but I didnít try to dismantle them. I havenít taken apart the Novatec hubs yet. Rest assured, this bike seems to be as well assembled as an average LBS bike.


    Weight:

    Weight is about 15.8 kg (35#) stock before tubeless. Was hard to weigh with my fish scale. It never feels heavy and when riding on low pressure with knobby tires the weight doesnít matter much. I have a spare tire, pump, spare chain, water etc. with me and weigh 180 pounds. I read a lot about people replacing the seatpost, handlebar and stem etc. the only upgrade I would consider would be a carbon fork, but not this year. When riding uphill, weight still is not an issue with the tires.

    Upgrades:

    It came without paddles (as advertised), I replaced the grips and installed a computer. Those are the only upgrades I need right now. The saddle is surprisingly good for the shorter distances and will do for now (have Brooks on hybrid bike for long distances, so yes Iím sensitive). Some people install larger handlebars, but the 700mm are good for me and our trails seem to have narrow trees, so there might be a trade-off with wider bars. The stem also seems shorter than on my hybrid, all seems to fit well for me.

    Quality:

    The frame quality is excellent. Top tube welds are smoothed out all round seat post and head tube. The lower welds are not smoothed, but also relatively smooth. Paint is a shiny piano-type black. Very noble. My other bike is a Giant Toughroad and I would consider both frames equal in workmanship. All the components seem to be high quality. Even the handlebar, stem and seatpost have a powder-coated feel, which make them feel more solid than a smoot paint. The Internet says those are heavy, but that may be a good on an off-road oriented bike for more stability. The rims are Mulefut, same as I saw on the Trek bike I tested. The only concern are the Novatec hubs, but I also heard other makers have hub problems and when you go to LBS bike websites, they donít tell you what hubs they use to begin with, or use some house-brand. Unless you get DT Swiss hubs (like the Canyon dude), Iíd say they are all the same. The gear cable is internal and the rear hydraulic line is external with brazed on cable holders. All seems very nice. The derailleur only needed small limit screw and B-screw adjustment. It came with a spare derailleur hanger.

    Brakes:
    Iím a Shimano brake guy (love SRAM drivetrains) and them being Tektro with a different fluid seems to screw with my plans to simplify maintenance of my other bikes that all have Shimano brakes. But at least Tektro also uses mineral oil and the Internet tells me I can just use the Shimano fluid (even if Tektro doesnít say so). The internet also tells me they are also supposed to be easy to service. Time will tell. I know type of fluid is like a rim/disc brake discussion on a road bike forum. But to me that was one concern, but Iím less concerned now and will see. They seem to work fine from a modulation and power point. But the LBS bikes I tested all had SRAM brakes (DOT fluid, and you read the threads here about the trouble they cause) and I assume over time I would have to buy new brakes if I had SRAM brakes.

    Wheels:

    it came with spare Mulefut red rim strip (donít like a contrast) in addition to the black 60 mm rimstrip that is in the wheels. They seemed to be reasonably true and tension on all spokes was similar (tested with tension meter). With some noob difficulties I converted them to tubeless.

    Value:

    The value from bikedirect is really good. Based on the actual quality of the bike Iíd say you pay twice for an LBS bike of the same specs and quality. BD compares it to $3,000 at an LBS, but that seems excessive. I also had looked as ďFramedĒ bikes, but found them quite pricy especially for 1x11, which seems to be a $300 upcharge from them. The little communication I had with BD was prompt and correct. For another bike I definitely would try BD again and also recommend to others. The only annoyance was their website (with listing some bikes twice, I had a hard time navigating through all the different bikes they offer). They give you all the necessary information, though.

    Riding:

    this is my first fatbike, so no comparison besides all the internet research. I have 3 MTB trails near a bikepath that goes by my home. I started with the furthest (15 km) and worked my way back. I started out with about 14 psi (measured with 60 psi car gage, so may be inaccurate) rear and 13 psi front. Yes this is high, but I assumed with my tubeless I may lose some air and can adjust at the trail. No self-steering, but I had to paddle constantly on the pavement. As expected, this is quite a workout. The first trial is a prairie type trail and has some steep section. After some tries lowered pressure to 13 psi rear and 10 psi front, worked much better. Gearing seems perfect with 30T chainring and 11-42T cassette. On the pavement downhill I can use the 10thor downhill the 11th gear and the steepest hills I could climb in lowest gear. One hill I climbed with getting out of the saddle and thought I would lose rear traction, but did not lose traction at all. I then went to the 2nd trail, but stopped at a construction site that had a quarry. Rode through the quarry on the hardened gravel and tracks the excavators left, was fun. No steering or other problems. Also downhill on sand and gravel I didnít have problems braking and sliding. On the trail I rode over some rocky climbs, all seemed fine (Iím very slow and donít do youtube-worthy stuff). It seemed to roll well, but also dampen the shocks well. Then it got dark and I went home. Meanwhile pressure was lower, but riding on pavement was not much worse. Again, no self-steering.

    Conclusion:

    Iím really happy with it. Iím glad I didnít get a cheaper one, but Iím also glad I didnít get a more expensive one since this seems good enough. Iím also glad I did a lot of research (including asking many question on this forumÖ thanks for all replies again)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Motobecane Sturgis NX Review-package.jpg  

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    Motobecane Sturgis NX Review-headset-1-.jpg  

    Motobecane Sturgis NX Review-headset-2-.jpg  

    Motobecane Sturgis NX Review-weld.jpg  

    Motobecane Sturgis NX Review-bike_complete.jpg  


  2. #2
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    I took the rear hub apart, didn't see anything wrong with it.
    At the suggestion of others I put threadlocker on the thread of the end cap as they may come loose and cause a failure.
    Motobecane Sturgis NX Review-threadlocker.jpg

    Pawl mechanism:
    Motobecane Sturgis NX Review-dimpel.jpgMotobecane Sturgis NX Review-bushing.jpg

    You need two 17 mm wrenches to open up the hub.

    I came across an issue installing the computer speed sensor. I had the magnet attached to a rear wheel spoke, like on a normal bike and had to move the sensor close. but that prevented me from taking out the wheel. I ended up putting a large magnet on the inside of the rear rotor and the sensor on the seatstay right by the caliper.
    Motobecane Sturgis NX Review-computer-1-.jpgMotobecane Sturgis NX Review-computer-2-.jpg
    This is not specific to this bike, I assume it is a general fatbike issue.

    I did a brake rotor Swicheroo. This Sturgis came with 180 mm rotors front and rear. My Giant Toughroad hybrid with 160 mm front and rear. I took the 180mm from rear and swapped it with the 160 mm from the hybrid front wheel. While at it I noticed I need new brake pads for the hybrid (Shimano M395). While searching pads I noticed the pads are the very same as for the Tektro Draco. So I know they are widely available and dirt cheap. I like the front bias of brakes on both bikes now.

  3. #3
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    Great review HerrKaLeun,

    So after having your bike for 4 weeks now, do you have anything additional to add to your review?

    I am also looking at the Motobecane Sturgis NX as my first Fat Bike after reading many posts in the forum.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottwoll1 View Post
    Great review HerrKaLeun,

    So after having your bike for 4 weeks now, do you have anything additional to add to your review?

    I am also looking at the Motobecane Sturgis NX as my first Fat Bike after reading many posts in the forum.
    Thanks for giving me an excuse to write about my bike I still love this bike.

    Riding:
    I didn't ride it as much as I wanted because of rain and other excuses like my hybrid bike. But I rode it on various MTB trails (prairie style to single trail) and also on some construction sites and a quarry nearby. So it got a variety of terrain. After dialing in pressure (7 psi in front and 12 psi in rear) it feels good with less chatter. I just bought a 15 psi gage and may try a bit less. On pavement I barely exceed 30 kmh, but sometimes I pass some roadbikes (with old people, but still). Tires sound like a WWII 4-engine bomber. Traction under all my conditions is superb. I'm still lacking lot of skills, and still am a chicken (but alive!). Rolling resistance on pavement is high, not much coasting. but off-road I have the feeling rolls on its own.

    Fit:
    Saddle is still good, but none of my tours is more than 30-40km. I added RaceFace Chester pedals and ergo grips with the short ends. I'm fine with the 700mm handlebar and our single trails have very narrow trees.

    Accessories:
    I bought a custom-made frame bag from Rogue Panda that holds my tools, spare tube, chain, waterbladder.

    Motobecane Sturgis NX Review-fatbag.jpg

    Fork:
    The only upgrade I considered, but kind of dismissed was to buy a CF fork next year. But I think the steel fork has similar suspension properties and CF would just reduce weight. But weight is not an issue once you overcome the rolling resistance. I can see the advantage of suspension, but not the need for my riding style.

    Drivetrain:
    Just perfect, love the 1x more and more. On pavement downhill I barely use the 11T in rear, never spins out over 80 or so rpm. Uphill the 42T seems sufficient with the 30T chainring. I use it a few times and for my next cassette I may consider a 11-46. Sometimes i have to stand up. But I'm not sure if it is my weight and/or lack of training more than the actual gearing. On the few uphills I had to give up I'm already spinning out. Will re-consider once I actually need to replace the cassette. i have no evidence that my occasional lack to get on very steep and rocky hills is related to actual gearing. Shifting is great.

    Everything else still is a sgood as on the first day. I just need to ride it more. I bought studded tires, obviously I haven't tried them yet. But once we have snow I will ride my hybrid less and this one more.
    2018 Motobecane Sturgis NX
    2016 Giant Toughroad SLR1

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
    Thanks for giving me an excuse to write about my bike I still love this bike.

    Riding:
    I didn't ride it as much as I wanted because of rain and other excuses like my hybrid bike. But I rode it on various MTB trails (prairie style to single trail) and also on some construction sites and a quarry nearby. So it got a variety of terrain. After dialing in pressure (7 psi in front and 12 psi in rear) it feels good with less chatter. I just bought a 15 psi gage and may try a bit less. On pavement I barely exceed 30 kmh, but sometimes I pass some roadbikes (with old people, but still). Tires sound like a WWII 4-engine bomber. Traction under all my conditions is superb. I'm still lacking lot of skills, and still am a chicken (but alive!). Rolling resistance on pavement is high, not much coasting. but off-road I have the feeling rolls on its own.

    Fit:
    Saddle is still good, but none of my tours is more than 30-40km. I added RaceFace Chester pedals and ergo grips with the short ends. I'm fine with the 700mm handlebar and our single trails have very narrow trees.

    Accessories:
    I bought a custom-made frame bag from Rogue Panda that holds my tools, spare tube, chain, waterbladder.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Fork:
    The only upgrade I considered, but kind of dismissed was to buy a CF fork next year. But I think the steel fork has similar suspension properties and CF would just reduce weight. But weight is not an issue once you overcome the rolling resistance. I can see the advantage of suspension, but not the need for my riding style.

    Drivetrain:
    Just perfect, love the 1x more and more. On pavement downhill I barely use the 11T in rear, never spins out over 80 or so rpm. Uphill the 42T seems sufficient with the 30T chainring. I use it a few times and for my next cassette I may consider a 11-46. Sometimes i have to stand up. But I'm not sure if it is my weight and/or lack of training more than the actual gearing. On the few uphills I had to give up I'm already spinning out. Will re-consider once I actually need to replace the cassette. i have no evidence that my occasional lack to get on very steep and rocky hills is related to actual gearing. Shifting is great.

    Everything else still is a sgood as on the first day. I just need to ride it more. I bought studded tires, obviously I haven't tried them yet. But once we have snow I will ride my hybrid less and this one more.
    Thanks for the review and link to the custom bags.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  6. #6
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    It's official.... just placed my order for my Motobecane 2018 Sturgis NX with Shimano PD-MX80 Saint Pedals. I hope the pedals arrive before the bike.... lol

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    hydration hose solution

    I added a longer tube to my hydration bladder. you can find such vinyl tube in any hardware store. A hairdryer helps to remove the old tube from the barbs and to slide the new one over.

    Then i attached one of those retractable badge holders
    with velcro. The watertube is held by one of those twisty wires.

    Now I can drink while riding without having to look down (which was required with the original short hose of the hydration bladder)

    Motobecane Sturgis NX Review-drink_hose.jpg

    I see many people with those backpack hydration bladders (like the camelpacks). the advantage is that you can get the hose to the mouth easily. But I think it is more comfortable to use a frame bag and that also has a lower center of gravity.
    Thought I share that, even if it is not fatbike related.
    2018 Motobecane Sturgis NX
    2016 Giant Toughroad SLR1

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
    I added a longer tube to my hydration bladder. you can find such vinyl tube in any hardware store. A hairdryer helps to remove the old tube from the barbs and to slide the new one over.

    Then i attached one of those retractable badge holders
    with velcro. The watertube is held by one of those twisty wires.

    Now I can drink while riding without having to look down (which was required with the original short hose of the hydration bladder)

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I see many people with those backpack hydration bladders (like the camelpacks). the advantage is that you can get the hose to the mouth easily. But I think it is more comfortable to use a frame bag and that also has a lower center of gravity.
    Thought I share that, even if it is not fatbike related.
    Great idea! Thanks for sharing.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  9. #9
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    Awesome review. Really making me consider this bike. I have an ecr as my all the time bike, loaded up with racks and bags. Been looking at the beargrease for more aggressive trails and to go much more streamlined and lighter. Came across this bike and after reading your review I am really considering it. Specs seem legit and the fact that it comes 1x really makes it tempting. Going 1x on the beargrease would cost another couple hundred in parts. Thanks for the thorough review!!

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    these days I'm mainly riding on local housing developments with the idea they will be gone next year but the MTB trails are here to stay. and it seems to be raining too much to dry the trails.

    As expected, it is getting muddy. So i decided to get some fenders and after research ended up with the Mudshovels front and rear.

    Motobecane Sturgis NX Review-fenders.jpg

    Besides some drivetrain and possible brake cleaning i just will leave the mud on the bike for now. I try to take advantage of the dirt before it snows and a clean bike would indicate i don't actually enjoy the bike as intended

    Another thing is I noticed the chain is at least 2 links (meaning 4" - 2 inner and 2 outer links) too long if you go by the standard sizing rule. I took one link out. it wasn't a problem either way, it just bothered me. I had the same "issue" with my Giant bike, so that seems to be a typical factory thing to keep chains a bit longer than needed. Better too long than too short, I guess.

    Other than that nothing new, still love it and haven't found flaws (just wish I had more time)

    SmuggiNOLA: thanks for the kind words. I didn't know the Beargrease and looked it up. Not sure that is an issue for you, but the specs say with 26" wheels it can have up to 4.6" tires. The Sturgis says to fit most 5" tires and comes with 4.8" tires. I think for snow/sand use you want as wide as possible. It looks like most new tires are 4.8".
    I would be concerned with the 160 mm rotors. Sturgis comes with 180 mm and i definitely recommend 180mm on front for any bike. Also not a friend of the Hayes brakes, I believe they use DOT brake fluid. I really think the mineral oil used by shimano/Tektro is much better and less hassle over time. It has longer shelf life, withstands higher temps, doesn't absorb water.... (I realize this topic can start an internet war.... so let's not start an off-topic discussion in this thread. This is just my personal opinion and advice and I'm not offended if you disagree and prefer DOT)
    2018 Motobecane Sturgis NX
    2016 Giant Toughroad SLR1

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    Quick question for you. You mention you converted to tubless on your Sturgis NX. Did you use the stock Maxxis Minion 4.8" tires? If so, have they given you any problems? I ask because on the Maxxis website, the 60TPI version is not explicitly marked as tubeless ready. However it does just say "You're on your own if you go tubeless". I assume the 60 tpi version is the set that comes from BD.

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    FYI for anyone with a Sturgis NX, the 49 tooth WolfTooth cog is compatible with the SRAM 11 speed cassette. It comes with a 18t cog to help even out the spacing. This would make the lowest gear around 18 gear inches (< 19.5" is widely considered to be a "good" steep climbing setup), or if you put a 34T up front it would keep the granny gear about the same as before but give you a higher top gear for touring (especially handy if you've got a 29+ wheelset). A 32t up front gives you a nice range in between the two.

    I was surprised to find that changing from 26"x4.7" to 29"x3.0", the gear inches are almost identical. This makes sense when you think about it because the overall wheel radius is about the same.

    Thus, you could turn this platform into a nice touring bike packing setup with a 34 or 36t up front and low rolling resistance 29+ tires. You'd have a really fast high speed and still be able to crush most hills.

    https://www.wolftoothcomponents.com/...am-and-sunrace

    Here's the gear chart (from sheldon brown's calculator).

    Motobecane Sturgis NX Review-altkwu4.jpg

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by blaineb View Post
    ...Did you use the stock Maxxis Minion 4.8" tires? If so, have they given you any problems? I ask because on the Maxxis website, the 60TPI version is not explicitly marked as tubeless ready. However it does just say "You're on your own if you go tubeless". I assume the 60 tpi version is the set that comes from BD.
    Per BD they are 60 TPI. they seem to be really tubeless per BD and they also hook into the rim like a tubeless tire. You actually have to push quite a bit to get them out of the bed. I described here how the conversion went. I had some difficulty, but that was not related to the tire, more to my inexperience. In some weeks i put the studded tires on and will try to do better. It was hard to get the tire back to the rim. Once it is on the rim, it seems very sealed. I had more sealing problems with the tape job and will re-do that. With sealant it worked fine. One trick i will try is to remove the valve core when inflating with compressor to increase airflow even more (compressor helps to make up for lack of skills... some people can do that with floorpump)

    Quote Originally Posted by blaineb View Post
    FYI for anyone with a Sturgis NX, the 49 tooth WolfTooth cog is compatible with the SRAM 11 speed cassette. It comes with a 18t cog to help even out the spacing. This would make the lowest gear around 18 gear inches (< 19.5" is widely considered to be a "good" steep climbing setup), or if you put a 34T up front it would keep the granny gear about the same as before but give you a higher top gear for touring (especially handy if you've got a 29+ wheelset). A 32t up front gives you a nice range in between the two.

    I was surprised to find that changing from 26"x4.7" to 29"x3.0", the gear inches are almost identical. This makes sense when you think about it because the overall wheel radius is about the same.

    Thus, you could turn this platform into a nice touring bike packing setup with a 34 or 36t up front and low rolling resistance 29+ tires. You'd have a really fast high speed and still be able to crush most hills.

    https://www.wolftoothcomponents.com/...am-and-sunrace

    Here's the gear chart (from sheldon brown's calculator).

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Can you also confirm that the derailleur can clear the 49T? It is only rated for 42T (like most 11-speed) and I would bet this is conservative. For the next cassette I thought of getting a 11-46T. I'm fine with the range of 11-42, but some higher cadence uphill or in the mud may help. I don't think I would install larger chainring. One street hill I ran down at 40 kmh and didnt think I'm spinning out. The tires brake too much anyway. For normal flat or slight downhill riding I barely use the 11T cog anyway. Conclusion, if i needed to extent range, it would be towards the lower gears, not the faster ones. If you go bike-packing with the added weight, I'd think you want even more lower range. but this is just my personal opinion, based on my current physical condition. If you have stronger legs and are lighter than me, higher speed may be possible.

    This may sound ignorant, why would i do the hack with the woldftooth for almost $90 when I can buy a new 11-46 cassette for $70? (or $88 if Shimano) I thought that Wolftooth hack is to re-use an existing expensive cassette. Or do you just buy the cheaper 11-42T cassettes and keep re-using that 49T cog? For me a 46T would be more than fine.

    On some rare occasions i pass by road bikes on the bike path. On a straight horizontal and no headwind my max speed is around 30 kmh. I could go faster, but not for long. Very satisfying to beat a road bike with a fatbike (but those are older riders). But I'm very sure I could beat any road bike on the trails, in the snow or the mud. they are just afraid to even try
    2018 Motobecane Sturgis NX
    2016 Giant Toughroad SLR1

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post

    Can you also confirm that the derailleur can clear the 49T? It is only rated for 42T (like most 11-speed) and I would bet this is conservative. For the next cassette I thought of getting a 11-46T. I'm fine with the range of 11-42, but some higher cadence uphill or in the mud may help. I don't think I would install larger chainring. One street hill I ran down at 40 kmh and didnt think I'm spinning out. The tires brake too much anyway. For normal flat or slight downhill riding I barely use the 11T cog anyway. Conclusion, if i needed to extent range, it would be towards the lower gears, not the faster ones. If you go bike-packing with the added weight, I'd think you want even more lower range. but this is just my personal opinion, based on my current physical condition. If you have stronger legs and are lighter than me, higher speed may be possible.
    Excellent points. Thank you for that. I hadn't considered limitations on the derailleur itself. Wolftooth does recommend a longer chain, so they don't seem to be worried about it. But certainly is worth consideration.

    Quote Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post

    This may sound ignorant, why would i do the hack with the woldftooth for almost $90 when I can buy a new 11-46 cassette for $70? (or $88 if Shimano) I thought that Wolftooth hack is to re-use an existing expensive cassette. Or do you just buy the cheaper 11-42T cassettes and keep re-using that 49T cog? For me a 46T would be more than fine.
    Uhhhh, also a great point. I have no response for that. Haha. I didn't realize there is a 11-46t cassette for that price (since most stock cassettes are 11-42t). Given the choice for a new build or even a new wheel without cassette, that seems like the obvious choice. Is a Shimano cassette generally compatible with an SRAM derailleur?

  15. #15
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    Hey guys I'm new here and think I'm in the market for just this bike.

    Did anyone who is 5'8" with normal arm length and normal leg length who purchased the motobecane sturgis (or night train, etc) choose to size down to a small?

    If so can you tell me about your ride?

    Curious to see what the frame does when you choose small instead of medium.

    Thanks!

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    I'm closer to 5'9" than 5'8" with long arms and sized down to a small Sturgis. I think it fit ok. Over time I put on a longer stem and setback post to stretch it out a little. Then after some time I bought a curve top tube frame in a medium and swapped the parts across. I probably could have kept riding it just fine and been happy but I wanted a slightly different feel too.

  17. #17
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    Do you have a picture of the size small frame?

    I'm trying to determine if downsizing the frame Missaligns the seat stay from the top tube where the two tubes meet at the seat tube.

    For example when going to a size small on a TREK Farley 5 the top tube is lowered and missaligns from the seat stay where the 2 tubes meet at the seat tube. therefore the size small and medium frames look unalike.

    Other manufacturer's frames merely shrink the seat tube and keep the seat stay and top tube aligned at the spot where they meet at the seat tube.

    so a picture of the size shall would be very beneficial.

    Thanks!

  18. #18
    mtbr member
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    This was my small 2016? sturgis. This is the only picture I can get to upload. the others keep giving me an error. Hopefully it gets the you what you need
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Motobecane Sturgis NX Review-20170114_094222.jpg  


  19. #19
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    here's a full frame shot
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Motobecane Sturgis NX Review-sturgis.jpg  


  20. #20
    Flying Sasquatch
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    I have the 11-46 Sunrace cassette on my my NX setup and it's great. Shifts better than stock.

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